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Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) 2023 – Los Angeles

  • Stipend of $4,000
  • Travel allowance
  • Housing and meals on campus
  • Site-visit with sponsors (subject to confirmation)
  • Limited partial support for future travel to select conferences
  • Foreign students (studying in the US or abroad) are eligible
  • Graduating seniors are eligible

Encouraging the careers of women and minority mathematicians and scientists is an important component of IPAM’s mission and we welcome their applications. You must be at least 18 years of age to participate in either program.

RIPS-LA runs June 20 – August 18, 2023. Students will live in residence halls on the UCLA campus and will work at IPAM, which will provide technical support and offices. We expect to have nine projects, but the sponsors and projects are not yet finalized. Please see the FAQ page for more information.

Attention:  Please note the different dates of the LA and Singapore programs.

IPAM is committed to equity and diversity in the mathematical sciences. We strongly encourage members of traditionally underrepresented groups including women to apply.

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Irradiation of biological tissue for study of the effects of charged particle irradiation in the space environment.

Long-duration manned space missions pose important questions as to how to protect astronauts and plants used as food from the effects of charged-particle irradiation in interplanetary space. In these studies we are investigate using various biological indicators effects such as  the influence of radiation on root tip growth as well as the effect and mortality of animal tissues.

Characterisation of Hg-release pathways in dental amalgams

In this project which in carried out in collaboration with the Department of Applied Radiation and Isotopes at Kasetsart University Bangkok, the spatial distribution of Hg in amalgam at the amalgam/enamel interface and the biting surface are investigated. A number of different teeth are with different types are being investigated in the MeV ion microscope using PIXE to characterise the elements. Colocalisation is used to identify regions of different amalgam phases.

Image showing regions of Hg and Ca and co-localized Ca and Hg

Analysis of growth rings in the operculum and shell of apple snails

Apple snails (Pomacea maculata , superfamily: Ampullarioidea)  are an invasive species in Louisiana. They inhabit fresh water and grow rapidly.  In this research we are measuring the uptake of elements from the environment and how they are deposited in the growth rings of the operculum and shell. The ultimate goal of the research is to develop a monitoring tool to provide a bio-chronological method to map how concentrations of  heavy elements in the fresh water are correlated in time with surges in discharge rate of  fresh water into rivers and lakes due to e.g. storm events.

Construction of a low-flux charged particle irradiation facility to BSL-2 standard

The radiation doses of interest for testing charged-particle (mostly proton) irradiation in space in low-earth orbit and deep inter-planetary space are in the range 1 mGy–50 Gy in a year. By exploiting that for fast charged particle most of the dose is deposited in the Bragg peak where the charged particles have slowed to a few MeV energy, it is possible to perform testing with few MeV protons.  The proton fluxes required lie in the range 106–109 3 MeV protons cm-2s-1 which is extremely low compared to the typical fluxes of 1011–1014 protons cm-2s-1 for conventional ion implantation with an accelerator. In order to achieve such low fluxes a microprobe with a fixed beam is being developed that can deliver external focused beams as well as extremely low fluxes of ions for space charged particle simulation. The low fluxes are achieved by using small aperture sizes in the microprobe bringing the ions to a focus as in Abbe’s critical illumination condenser, where the ions are allowed to diverge after the conjugate focus to give a divergent beam with a low uniform flux of ions. Dosimetry is done by monitoring the rate of backscattered ions from a membrane target place in front of the sample.

The external beam is directed into a glove box so that the tissue samples for irradiation can be handled under BSL-2 level conditions. The figure below shows the new low-flux irradiation end station during commissioning.

Low-flux irradiation end station during commissioning

Enhancing resolution of time pick-off detectors

In Time-of-Flight–Energy Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ToF¬E ERDA) the time resolution has hardly improved  from ~250 ps FWHM since the first introduction of this multi-dispersive analysis method since in 1987. An in-depth investigation of the underlying factors that govern the time resolution is being implemented with a view to developing third generation time pick-off detectors that not only have an improved time resolution, but are cheaper to implement and have better Ultra-High vacuum (UHV) compatibility. Making them better suited for analysis of thin-structures within a few nm of the surface.  The in-depth study has revealed numerous improvements can be made and an improvement in resolution with a factor 2-3 is quite possible.  In particular concerning the electron optical design, which can reduce ion energy spreading from the tandem effect and after-pulsing due to secondary electrons as well as perturbations due to field distortions in the vicinity of wire harps. Other improvements can reduce the shape variations in the pules from the anode.

Longitudinal study of impurities in aluminum museum artefacts

This is an undergraduate student research project with HES-SO Switzerland. Previously, measured external-beam article Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) data  for a range of artefacts from museums in Switzerland is being analysed. The age of the samples range from ~1860, where alumnum was produced by the amalgam process to the 1980s.  Preliminary results show that there is a significant difference in the impurity content between the artefact produced by the amalgam process compared to the lower cost electrolytic process introduced later. The results support that the compact hand-held XRF that are suitable for use in a museum environment can be used to distinguish between aluminium produced by the chemical technique ant the electrolytic technique. Other findings are that the in the period 1900-1950 the composition of the aluminium corresponded to “commercial” pure aluminium (99 et.%) with little variation.

A user-friendly computer controlled interface for sample positioning in the MeV ion microscope

In this undergraduate and graduate research project, we are developing a robotics tool that can be used with a 2–axis positioner to move the sample to the desired field of interest in the MeV ion microscope. The sample can be moved to pre-set positions, or programmable steps and scan to allow collection of large field of view images that a are mosaic of smaller fields of view as well as simple jog movements to position the sample.

Improving the quantification of PIXE analysis using the GEOPIXE software

A graduate project with the Department of Chemistry at UL Lafayette ad Kasetsart University in Bankok. The GeoPIXE software includes a large number of features that allow quantitative elemental maps to be produced by the (CSRIO) GeoPIXE software. 

An MeV SIMS instrument for organic compound analysis

While the inorganic and thin-film samples have been widely studied by ion beam analysis (IBA) with MeV ions, analysis of organic compounds has largely been neglected. In this project we are developing a MeV SIMS instrument using plasma desorption mass spectroscopy in conjunction with a MeV ion microprobe.

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Cooling structure

Research Project | 2021

Heat Resilient L.A.

A team of 10 UCLA professors has earned a $956,000 award for a project that will combine their expertise in engineering, urban planning, public health and environmental law to address the rapid increase in the number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles.

The prize is funded by a 2015 donation from the Anthony and Jeanne Pritzker Family Foundation.

The project, called Heat Resilient L.A., will over the next two years determine where and when people moving around the city are most vulnerable to the effects of extreme heat — a problem being caused by climate change — and assess which communities most need cooling interventions.

Based on their findings, the team will design new cooling structures and work with local stakeholders to determine where they should be installed. The team has designed a prototype structure that resembles a bus stop shelter, but in addition to a roof that provides shade, it also uses a combination of radiant and evaporative cooling technologies to provide “passive cooling” for those nearby.

Throughout the project, the researchers plan to engage directly with communities to produce the best possible design for the cooling structures and choose the best possible locations. Among the elements that helped the project stand out: its focus on equity and community engagement, and its use of devices other than shade and trees to provide cooling for local hot spots.

“What’s unique right now is that we have access to a portfolio of solutions and technologies that hadn’t been either thought of as plausible solutions or, frankly, available even just a few years ago,” said Aaswath Raman, a member of the Heat Resilient L.A. team and an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering. Raman, who is designing the cooling structures using technology that has been developed in recent years at UCLA and elsewhere, said the project is an opportunity to explore the real-world use of emerging cooling technologies and materials.

That should not only help Los Angeles communities but also provide insights that he and others can use to continue building better technologies.

A different kind of funding pitch

The winning project was chosen through a new UCLA initiative that upended the traditional model for conceiving and funding research projects. The program, called the Sustainable LA Grand Challenge Sandpit, emphasized connection, experimentation and blue-sky thinking.

In all, eight teams made up of more than 60 faculty members from 27 UCLA departments participated.

The program culminated in December with an online pitch event that worked more like the TV show “Shark Tank” than a typical call for proposals. Instead of preparing dense written submissions, the teams had to sell their research projects — all focused on sustainability — to a panel of jurors that included UCLA deans as well as chief sustainability officers from the city and county.

The Heat Resilient L.A. pitch was led by Raman; V. Kelly Turner, an assistant professor of urban planning at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs; and David Eisenman, a professor in residence at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

The other members of the winning team are Cara Horowitz, co-executive director of the UCLA Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; Sungtaek Ju, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and of bioengineering; Travis Longcore, associate adjunct professor at the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability; Juan Matute, deputy director of the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies; Gregory Pierce, associate director of the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation; Kirsten Schwarz, associate professor of urban planning; and Walker Wells, lecturer in urban planning.

“The sandpit was definitely not business as usual, and that was the point,” said Cassie Rauser, executive director of the UCLA Sustainable LA Grand Challenge, a campuswide initiative to help transform Los Angeles into the world’s most sustainable megacity by 2050. “We wanted to bring together brilliant minds at UCLA who had never collaborated before, and push them to bring fresh ideas to the table. This type of interdisciplinary problem-solving is absolutely critical for addressing Los Angeles’s complex sustainability challenges.”

Competitors were invited to develop projects that directly address goals outlined in sustainability plans put forward by Los Angeles County and the City of Los Angeles, while paying particular attention to environmental justice and equity. The “sandpit” name was meant to encourage participants to bring a childlike sense of curiosity, openness and possibility into the process.

Teams and research concepts formed over the course of three months of online workshops designed to push participants out of their disciplinary bubbles and intellectual comfort zones — a critical aspect of the experience, according to Turner, who has studied what makes interdisciplinary collaborations work.

“So often it is about the informal interactions that get folks comfortable with being uncomfortable with each other, so that they can come up with the really innovative ideas,” she said.

The seven teams that did not win the grand prize will each receive $25,000 in seed funding from the Sustainable LA Grand Challenge, which will also provide continued research development support to help the teams further develop their ideas and pursue full funding from external organizations.

“One of the most exciting aspects of the sandpit is that we heard eight fantastic pitches,” said Eric Hoek, a UCLA professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of the Sustainable LA Grand Challenge. “Any of those projects could make a significant, tangible contribution toward our city’s and county’s sustainability goals, and we’re excited to help them all realize their potential.”

Related Publications

Do social vulnerability indices correlate with extreme heat health outcomes?

S. Derakhshan, D. P. Eisenman, R. Basu, T. Longcore

Published Work | 2023 | The Journal of Climate Change and Health

Smartphone locations reveal patterns of cooling center use as a heat mitigation strategy

S. Derakhshan, T. N. Bautista, M. Bouwman, L. Huang, L. Lee, J. Tarczynski, I. Wahagheghe, X. Zeng, T. Longcore.

Published Work | 2023 | Applied Geography

IoES Contributors

  • David P. Eisenman
  • Cara Horowitz
  • Travis Longcore
  • Gregory Pierce
  • Casandra Rauser
  • Kirsten Schwarz
  • V. Kelly Turner

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UCLA Graduate Programs

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Summer Programs for Undergraduate Research (SPUR)

Program purpose.

The UCLA Summer Programs for Undergraduate Research (SPUR) offer upper division undergraduate students with outstanding academic potential the opportunity to work closely with faculty mentors on research projects.  The programs are designed for students who wish to learn more about the graduate school experience and possibly pursue an academic career in teaching and research.  Opportunities are available in virtually all academic fields (e.g., arts, humanities, social sciences, life sciences, health sciences, physical sciences, etc.).

Student participants in many SPUR programs will work with a faculty mentor with special expertise and interests matched, as closely as possible, to the student’s research interests and career goals. Most, but not all, SPUR programs pair students with a faculty mentor.  Students will either assist the faculty member in an ongoing research project or work collaboratively with the mentor in designing a new project of mutual interest.

Most SPUR programs feature seminars on:

  • writing and research skills
  • strategies for enhancing success in applying to graduate school
  • graduate school funding opportunities
  • opportunities for informal discussion with UCLA graduate students
  • academic career opportunities
  • cultural and educational activities

For further details about specific programs, please refer to the  UCLA Summer Programs for Undergraduate and Graduate Research Booklet .

As a condition of acceptance into the program, program participants will be asked after their departure to update information on their educational and career activities. This tracking is done solely to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. It is critical that we be able to conduct this long-term evaluation in order to maintain continuing funding for the programs. The information collected remains strictly confidential.

Please check with your respective summer program of interest about whether it will be conducted remotely or in-person.

2024 Program Dates

Most programs run eight weeks, from June 2024 to August 2024. Some programs in the sciences, technological, engineering and mathematics fields run 10 weeks, from June 2024 to September 2024.  One program in the humanities and social sciences runs six weeks, from June 2024 to August 2024.

The tentative dates for SPUR 2024 are June 23 to August 17 (8-week programs) and June 23 to August 30 (10-week programs).

All application materials and supporting documents must be  received by March 31, 2024 unless otherwise stated in the program description.  Preference will be given to applications that are completed by the program’s deadline. Notification of decisions will be made by the end of May 2024.  Please contact the individual program coordinators for questions regarding the application and application deadline.

Programs interested in being added to the those included in SPUR (or those on hiatus and seeking to resume inclusion) must reach out to RaShawna Williams, SPUR Program Representative, at  [email protected]  by March 31, 2024. We do our best to include all requests, but cannot guarantee participation.

Participating Programs

There are multiple programs participating with UCLA SPUR. Below are brief summaries of each program. The summaries include the specific program components, eligibility requirements and length of the summer program. Please view the  chart of participating summer programs at UCLA  for a quick reference of programs and their related academic fields.

Please click on the links to learn about each program. You will be able to apply to a maximum of two (first choice and second choice) in our online application.

Amgen Scholars Program

Application Deadline: February 1, 2024

The Amgen Scholars Program is a national program to increase learning and networking opportunities for students committed to pursuing a career in science or engineering. Students interested in summer research in any area of biomedical science, chemistry, bioengineering or chemical engineering are encouraged to apply. Students will be paired with a UCLA faculty mentor if the student does not already have one. Program typically includes stipend; housing; meals; 2-day biotechnology in Los Angeles; luncheons with faculty; workshops; seminars and poster presentations.

  • For undergraduates enrolled in four-year colleges and universities in the U.S., Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories.
  • For sophomores (with 4 quarters or 3 semesters of college experience), juniors and non-graduating seniors (who are returning in the fall to continue their undergraduate experience).
  • Must have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.2 or above.
  • Must be interested in pursuing a Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D.
  • 10 weeks (all participants must be able to attend the program for its entire duration. Be sure to check your fall term start date before applying).
  • If you have questions, please contact Kim Mendez at [email protected].

Bioscience Scholars Program

Application Deadline: TBD

The Bioscience Scholars Program (formerly known as SPUR LABS) provides a rigorous eight or ten-week research training experience for undergraduates with interests in a broad range of bioscience disciplines– —from molecules to organisms and from basic to translational science. Exceptional research training, integrated with professional development activities, will prepare students to succeed in leading Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. programs. The program aims to contribute to diversity, inclusion, and the elimination of barriers to participation in bioscience research careers and is designed for students participating in honors research programs that foster transition to doctoral programs (e.g., Minority Access to Research Careers, MARC). Participants receive a stipend & food allowance of $4,000 for 8 weeks or $5,000 for 10 weeks. Participants will be matched with an appropriate faculty member based on research interests. There are over 400 faculty mentors in ten bioscience research areas.

A complete application includes the submission of the online application form as well as all supplementary materials, including two letters of recommendation and a personal statement that describes your bioscience research interests and any research experience, including how these interests and experiences have shaped your personal and professional goals, and how Bioscience Scholars Program would help you meet these goals. See Bioscience Scholars Program website for full details of supplementary application materials.

Selection criteria: academic preparation and achievement; leadership potential; relevance of research interests and experience; potential for the program to help the applicant achieve his/her career goals; and potential to contribute to the diversity and excellence of the bioscience research enterprise.

  • U.S. citizen, U.S. permanent resident, or AB 540
  • Prior to beginning the program, completion of at least two years of undergraduate study
  • Participants may not be UCLA students; UCLA students should consider other summer research opportunities such as CARE SEM or Amgen Scholars
  • Minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0
  • Intention to pursue a Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. in a bioscience field and not admitted or enrolled in a graduate program (M.S. or Ph.D.) at the time the program begins

For additional information see Bioscience Scholars Program website or contact the Program Directors, Drs. Gregory Payne and Diana Azurdia at [email protected] .

B.I.G. Summer (Bruins In Genomics) 8-week Summer Research Program for Masters and Undergraduate Students

Application Deadline: March 1, 2024

Bruins-in-Genomics (B.I.G. Summer) is an 8-week full-time immersion program for undergraduates interested in learning how to read and analyze genes and genomes. Through this program students will have the opportunity to experience graduate-level coursework, and learn the latest cutting-edge research, tools and methods used by leading scientists to solve real-world problems.

Applicants must be:

  • A U.S. citizen, permanent resident, or F-1 visa holder
  • Be a rising junior or senior
  • have a GPA of 3.0 or higher
  • have some familiarity with at least one programming language (e.g. python, pearl, R, Java, MAT-LAB, C++, etc.); preferably have taken bioinformatics or biostatistics courses

Students interested in applying should only do so here.

For more information:

Email: [email protected]

Brain Research Institute Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (BRI-SURE)

The UCLA Brain Research Institute (BRI) sponsors a summer undergraduate research experience (BRI-SURE) pathway program for students currently participating in the Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) and other honors research programs whose goal is to increase diversity. This program solicits applications from students from universities and colleges across the nation. BRI-SURE Pathway is an 8-week, intensive summer research-training program for exceptional students interested in pursuing research careers in Neuroscience or Physiology. The program is designed to provide a rigorous, in-depth research experience to prepare participants for top-quality Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. graduate programs. The BRI-SURE residential program offers a summer stipend. The BRI-SURE non-residential program does not offer a summer stipend. Although we anticipate an on-campus summer experience, we may have to resort to an online-only Summer Research Experience for 2022.

  • Applicants must be in good academic standing with a minimum GPA of 3.0;
  • Applicants must submit the following: 1) UCLA SPUR Online application form, 2) Academic transcript, 3) Personal statement (limit to 1000 words) that describes your past, present or future leadership in and commitment to research and diversity in science, 4) Summary of prior research, if any (limit to 1000 words), 5) Two letters of recommendation from science faculty, and 6) Paragraph (500 words or less) summarizing your interest in neuroscience or physiology;
  • In a separate file, applicants need to rank in order of preference, the top three research training areas: Neuroendocrinology, Sex Differences, and Reproduction; Neural Repair; Neural Microcircuits; Neurobehavioral Genetics; Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology; or Molecular, Cellular and Integrative Physiology;
  • Submit additional application materials directly to [email protected]

To learn more about how to apply to this program, please contact Dr. Gina Poe (Program Director) at [email protected]

California State University (CSU) Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars Program

Application Deadline: Contact the program representative for your campus’ CSU Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars Program

This program is restricted to undergraduate and master’s-level students in the California State University Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Program. The Program is designed to increase the pool of potential university faculty by supporting the doctoral aspirations of CSU students who have experienced economic and educational disadvantages. Each of the selected CSU Sally Casanova pre-doctoral scholars works closely during the academic year with a CSU faculty sponsor to develop an overall plan leading ultimately to enrollment in a doctoral program. Each of these plans is tailored to specific goals and educational objectives of the student. The Program places special emphasis on increasing the number of CSU students who enter doctoral programs at one of the University of California institutions. Summer Program includes: stipend, on-campus housing or housing allowance, meal allowance, funds toward roundtrip transportation cost, GRE test preparation, workshops and oral presentations.

  • Open to all current CSU Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholars, both graduate and undergraduate.
  • 8 week program.
  • CSU Scholars complete only the UCLA SPUR online application after they have approval from the UCLA SPUR Coordinator; do not submit supplemental materials.
  • To become a CSU Sally Casanova Pre-Doctoral Scholar, please contact the program representative on your CSU campus.

Community College Field Biology Alliance

Application Deadline: February 16, 2024

This is an 8-month research internship designed for community college students. Student interns are assigned a graduate and undergraduate research mentor and meet remotely on the first Saturday of each month from May to June to design a field biology-based research project. In July we travel as a group to a remote field station for 7 days to enact the planned intern research projects. The program culminates with student research presentations in December.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • Full-time community college student.
  • Interest in environmental science, ecology, animal behavior, botany, and similar fields.
  • Ability to attend all monthly meetings and field excursion (all expenses covered by the program).

For more information and to apply, please visit the Community College Field Biology Alliance website . If you have any questions, please email them Amanda Robin (Program Director) at [email protected].

Cultivating Interest in Research Careers (CIRC)

Application Deadline: March 18, 2024

The Cultivating Interest in Research Careers (CIRC) program is a partnership between University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU). The program starts with a ten-week summer research program at UCLA, AND extends into a year-long continuum. The goal of CIRC is to provide community college students underrepresented​ in medicine and science (UIMS), such as African American, Latinx, Native American, Pacific​ Islander, disabled and socioeconomically disadvantaged students, with hands-on exposure and training in scientific research aligned with the scientific mission of the NHLBI.

The CIRC program will provide these community college students with educational workshops, near-peer mentoring, and skills to help them transfer to a 4-year college or university and ultimately be prepared to pursue a health profession or scientific research career.

  • A current high school senior who has taken at least a semester of community college classes and plans on transferring to a community college in the Fall,
  • OR Current community college student attending a community college in Los Angeles County (Must have at least a year of classes to complete before transferring to a four-year college or university) attending a community college in Los Angeles County
  • Qualify as a student from an underrepresented group as defined by either A OR B:

A) Identify as a member of one of the following racial/ethnic groups:

  • Black or African American
  • Hispanic or Latinx
  • American Indian or Alaska Native
  • Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander

B) Have a disadvantaged family background, defined as either 1 OR 2 below :

  • having been or currently being homeless, were or currently are in the foster care system, were eligible for the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program for two or more years, have/had no parents or legal guardians who completed a bachelor’s degree (e.g., “First-Generation”),
  • were or currently are eligible for Federal Pell grants, received support from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children coming from an educational environment such as that found in certain rural or inner-city environments that has demonstrably and directly inhibited the individual from obtaining the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to develop and participate in a research career.

C) US citizen or permanent resident

D) Have taken at least one college course in the general domains listed below and have composite grade point average of 3.2 or above in this coursework:

  • Oral Communication
  • Written Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning.
  • Must be able to attend the entire duration of the program.

To learn more information please visit the program website or email Humberto Sanchez, BA, Program manager CDU, [email protected] .

The Diversity Project

The Diversity Project is a 10-week* research-intensive summer program funded by the UC-HBCU initiative and the National Science Foundation focused on increasing participation of underrepresented minority students in marine and evolutionary biology. Through fieldwork and laboratory training, students will learn an integrative approach towards the study of the ecology and biodiversity of coral reef ecosystems at the Gump South Pacific Research Station on the island of Mo’orea, French Polynesia.  TDP complements student-centered fieldwork and laboratory research with mentoring on career development, ranging from successfully applying to graduate school to choosing a career. TDP faculty also work with students to publish their research and to present their work at national and international meetings. Some funding dedicated to students from Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). *Note: This year’s program begins Monday, June 5, 2023.

Requirements:

  • Current sophomore or junior standing, or non-graduating seniors
  • Great attitude and willingness to learn SCUBA diving

To learn more information please see program website .  To request The Diversity Project application, please contact Program Director, Dr. Paul Barber ( [email protected] ).

HBCU: Evolutionary Medicine – Pathways to PhDs

The HBCU: Evolutionary Medicine-Pathways to PhDs program is open to undergraduate juniors and seniors from HBCUs.  Participants will work on Evolutionary Medicine topics at UCLA.  Evolutionary Medicine is the study of how evolutionary and ecological principles affect medicine and medical applications, and how medical and clinical problems generate new research questions and ideas in evolution.  Evolutionary medicine is fast emerging as an important new field in the biomedical sciences.  Representing an interdisciplinary subject that combines ecology and evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, zoology, systems biology and microbiology with medicine, the field of evolutionary medicine has the potential to transform the way biomedical researches and doctors examine medical questions, conduct biomedical research, and treat patience.  Summer interns will work closely with a principal investigator (PI) from UCLA’s Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department and a PI from the David Geffen School of Medicine.  Application requirements:

  • Undergraduate juniors and seniors from HBCUs to work on Evolutionary Medicine topics at UCLA.
  • Send all application materials to Dr. Pamela Yeh at [email protected]

Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) U*STAR Program

The Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) U*STAR Program is a two-year, NIH-funded, undergraduate honors program that seeks to increase the number of biomedical scientists from diverse backgrounds that significantly impact health-related research. The program specifically seeks to strengthen the skills and research training of students from groups traditionally underrepresented in the biomedical sciences. This program is appropriate for students interested in pursuing a PhD or dual PhD degree upon completion of their baccalaureate degree.

The MARC Program offers research training, financial support, mentoring, networking opportunities and academic preparation for strong and motivated students. The UCLA MARC program is one of the longest-standing MARC programs at Research I universities across the nation, and graduates from the program have embarked on highly successful careers.

  • 3.2 GPA at the time of application; borderline GPAs also encouraged to apply
  • Junior or senior standing (completed 90 or more units) by the time that the student will begin as a MARC trainee, AND have two years remaining at UCLA at the start of the program
  • Citizen or permanent resident of the United States

To learn more about eligibility, program requirements, and scholarship/funding please refer to the MARC website . Additionally, the online application and other details about the application process will be hosted on the MARC website . For any additional questions, please contact Larone Ellison ( [email protected] ).

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Writing and Research Training Program

Application deadline: March 15, 2024

*Deadline may be extended as needed.

The Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Writing and Research Training Program at UCLA is an intensive writing and research program for 20 current Mellon Mays Fellows from participating Mellon Mays colleges and universities. Fellows participate in a rigorous scholarly writing and research methodology course, individual and group mentoring sessions, workshops, events, and a final research colloquium. The program also includes on-campus housing and a meal allowance.

  • Applicants must be current Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellows at their colleges or universities
  • For rising juniors (first-year MMUF students) or seniors (second-year MMUF students)
  • Please note that students will NOT be paired directly with a faculty mentor but will take an intensive writing and research course.  Students will NOT take a GRE preparation course as part of the program.
  • Admission to the program is rolling; applicants are advised to apply early due to limited space.  Applications will be considered after the deadline only if space is available.
  • A complete application includes the submission of the online application form, as well as a brief research statement, a description of summer research goals, and a statement from the student’s MMUF coordinator. See the program website for full details of supplementary application materials.

To learn more about this program, please visit the program website or contact the Undergraduate Research Center– Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences at [email protected] .

Summer Training for Excellence in Education Research (STEER)

Application Deadline:  TBD

The Summer Training for Excellence in Education Research (STEER) program has been a successful staple of the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies (GSE&IS) at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Through participation in the program, Historically Black College and University (HBCU) students and faculty, and GSE&IS faculty share in a research apprenticeship experience that has contributed to STEER students’ admittance to some of our nation’s finest graduate programs including the UC system. In the proposed effort, our aims are to continue to: (1) Develop relationships between the UCs and HBCUs, (2) Prepare students for UC graduate application, and (3) Prepare and mentor a cohort of tremendously talented students to conduct educational research in competitive UC programs and beyond.

All applicants must refer to the STEER website for the most up-to-date information regarding the application process.  Additionally, the online application and other details about the application process will be hosted on the STEER website.

  • Eligibility is extended to upperclassmen and recent undergraduates from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
  • Open to all disciplines, however training will be in Education research.  Applicants are expected to be seriously interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in Education.
  • Major GPA of 3.0

For additional information, see STEER program website or contact the Program Coordinator, Brande M.Otis, at [email protected] .  The Program Co-Directors are Dr. Robert Cooper and Dr. Kimberley Gomez.

University of California Leadership Excellence through Advanced Degrees (UC LEADS) 2nd Summer

This program is restricted to current University of California undergraduate students in the UC system-wide UC LEADS Program. In line with the goals of the two-year program, the 2nd summer research program seeks to develop the students by providing research and educational experiences to further prepare them to assume positions of leadership in academia, industry, government and public service. UC LEADS students who are considering UCLA for graduate studies/PhD should seriously consider applying to UCLA’s summer program as a way to familiarize themselves with the campus and to network with potential mentors. The UCLA UC LEADS Summer Program includes: GRE test preparation, workshops and seminars, and the opportunity to present summer research findings at the end of summer symposium/poster session.

  • Academic Level: Open to 2nd-Summer UC LEADS students (those from other UC campuses who have completed their first year in the program).
  • Open to Depts/Disciplines: Open to all departments and disciplines in Science, Engineering & Math.
  • It is the UC LEADS scholar’s responsibility to secure a commitment from the UCLA faculty host BEFORE applying to the program. Questions about the process should be addressed to the student’s UC CAMPUS UC LEADS Coordinator.
  • UC LEADS Scholars complete only the UCLA SPUR online application after they have summer placement confirmation from the UCLA UC LEADS Coordinator. Scholars do NOT need to submit supplemental materials with their applications.

UCLA-HSI Superior Opportunities for Maximizing Access to Neuroscience (SOMA)

The SOMA-Neuroscience program supports a deeper Hispanic/LatinX participation in neuroscience, and ultimately the pursuit of a neuroscience doctoral degree. Each summer, we will select and invite a small group of interested students (3-7 students annually) from our partner Hispanic-Serving Institutions, or HSIs, for an 8-week summer immersive, in-person experience at UCLA to do research in a host laboratory. Open to undergraduate students.

The requirements for acceptance into the program include:

  • Must be student at a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) institution.
  • A major in one of the natural sciences, including Psychology
  • A minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Academic transcript
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Two letters of recommendation from science faculty
  • Summary of prior research, if any (500 words or less)
  • Summary of interest in neuroscience (1000 words or less)

To learn more about this program please visit the website or contact the program director, Dr. Alicia Izquierdo ( [email protected] ) and Larone Ellison ( [email protected] ).

UCLA-HBCU Neuroscience Pathways Program

The UCLA-HBCU Neuroscience Pathways program is open to undergraduate students that attend historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the United States. The goals of this program are: 1) to increase the impact on students and faculty at both HBCU partner institutions and UCLA and, 2) to incentivize quality mentorship of the interns in our UCLA host labs. We will engage in active research and teaching partnerships that accompany students before and beyond the 8-week internship at UCLA.

A group of interested students, selected jointly by the HBCU partner institutions and UCLA will be invited to spend 8 weeks at UCLA doing research in an appropriate host laboratory. Ideally, the research at UCLA will be commensurate with the experience at the HBCU partner institution. We will engage in active research and teaching partnerships that accompany students before and beyond the 8-week internship at UCLA of mentorship in the lab. Interns will be mentored and trained by the faculty members who run the respective labs. Additionally, we will host one “chaperone” HBCU faculty member per year to accompany the student for the first week of the internship- which is intended to foster both scientific collaboration and quality mentoring. To incentivize graduate studies at UCLA for HBCU interns, the BRI will offer a full 5-year stipend annually for at least one student, annually, who applies for and is accepted by the NSIDP. Furthermore, we will conduct outcome studies and publish them in a peer-reviewed journal, similar to other BRI outreach efforts. In short, we will take an innovative and holistic approach by providing not only a summer opportunity but by following the student before and after through online tools.

  • 8-week program
  • Applicants must submit the following: 1) UCLA SPUR Online application form, 2) letters of intent
  • Letters of Intent due by December 14, 2022. Please send to Larone Ellison ( [email protected] ).
  • If you will have a delay with any supplemental application material, contact Dr. Ketema Paul or Larone Ellison and inform them of the delay.
  • To learn more about this program, please contact Dr. Ketema Paul ( [email protected] ) or Larone Ellison ( [email protected] ).

UCLA Neuroscience Scholars Program (NeuroScholars)

The UCLA Neuroscience Scholars program is a 10-week intensive summer research training experience for exceptional UCLA sophomore and junior undergraduates that are committed to pursuing a graduate degree in neuroscience. Neuroscience Scholars will be paired with a UCLA faculty mentor based on their research interests. Students will conduct discovery research in the laboratories of their faculty mentors. The program also includes: on-campus housing, $5000 stipend, journal clubs, lunches with faculty, career development workshops, seminars, and poster presentations.

  • For sophomore and junior undergraduates in Neuroscience, Physiological Sciences, Psychobiology and other neurobiology-related fields.
  • Must have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.2 or above
  • Must be able to devote full-time effort over the entire duration of the 10 week program
  • Previous research experience is preferred
  • Applicants must submit must submit 1) UCLA SPUR online application, 2) personal statement summarizing your neuroscience research interests (limit 1000 words), 3) list of 3-5 neuroscience faculty mentors that you would like to work with, 3) summary of prior research, if any (limit 1000 words), 4) two letters of recommendation from science faculty, 5) resume/CV, 6) academic transcript

To learn more about this program, please contact Program Directors Dr. Jeff Donlea & Dr. Elaine Hsiao;  [email protected]

UCLA Public Health Scholars Training Program

Application deadline: January 31, 2o24

*Applications for summer 2024 cohort open November 1, 2024 and close January 31, 2024.

The UCLA Public Health Scholars Training Program provides undergraduate students the opportunity to explore the field of public health through hands-on training, structured workshops, group excursions, and leadership and professional development. Located in Los Angeles, the program offers scholars the opportunity to train at UCLA, to explore public health in one of the most diverse counties in the US, and to experience the city’s vibrant culture. We work with community The UCLA Public Health Scholars Training Program provides undergraduate students the opportunity to explore the field of public health through hands-on training, structured workshops, group excursions, and leadership and professional development. Located in Los Angeles, the program offers scholars the opportunity to train at UCLA, to explore public health in one of the most diverse counties in the US, and to experience the city’s vibrant culture. We work with community-based organizations, health systems, and government agencies to offer field placement opportunities for scholars that focus on health equity.

  • Must be a U.S. citizen, national, or resident (DACA recipients eligible) Must attend an institution in the U.S. or in a US territory.
  • Must be authorized to work in the U.S. Must possess an interest in exploring a career in the field of public health by the start of the program
  • Applicants must be: Community college graduates or transfers to four-year institutions OR In a four-year institution and have completed at least two years of undergraduate education (regardless of credit standing) by the start of the program OR Recent college graduates (Fall or Winter 2024 or Spring 2024) who have not enrolled in a graduate program by the start of the program.
  • Interest in exploring a career in the field of public health
  • Open to all majors/disciplines
  • Ability to be present in LA and participate in program activities from June 21 – August 14, 2024
  • Willingness to attend social and volunteer events on evenings and occasional weekends
  • Willingness to stay engaged with program for alumni tracking, professional development opportunities, maintaining contact with cohort, and participate in recruitment for the 2025 cohort
  • Successful submission of all application materials
  • There is no GPA requirement

Additional criteria outlined in the application and website. For questions, please contact [email protected] .

Diversity in Vision Science Undergraduate Summer Research Program

Application deadline: April 15, 2024

This research experience is a full-time, 8-week immersive research experience in vision science at the Stein Eye Institute, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). This program is designed to increase the diversity of undergraduates in vision science through dedicated faculty mentorship, hands-on research training/interactive learning, and career development opportunities. The program is open to undergraduate students with disadvantages backgrounds in the Greater Los Angeles Area in 2024.

Students will have the opportunity to learn and work on an original research project in laboratories with research focuses including but not limited to:

1. Understanding of vision and ophthalmology research and their importance in advancing the understanding of the visual pathways, developing novel therapeutic in various eye diseases, including glaucoma, degenerative retinal disorders, and corneal diseases.

2. Understanding the use of various state of art technology in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine in ophthalmology.

Students learn how to be a scientist in weekly lab meetings and will have the opportunity to present their findings at a UCLA scientific poster session as well as at their home institution. Additionally, students will engage in social activities and career development workshops with other summer research students on UCLA campus, thereby expanding their science community and faculty/peer network.

  • Express an intention to pursue a Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. (or other professional joint degree) in a bioscience field.
  • Should not admitted or enrolled in a graduate program (M.S. or Ph.D.) at the time the program begins.
  • Minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0. preferred
  • Reside in the Los Angeles area.

To apply to the program, please send the following to [email protected] :

  • Transcript (unofficial is acceptable)
  • Personal statement: up to 1 page providing your interests in vision research and how your participation can add to diversity to vision research.
  • Two brief letters of support (Professors can send these directly to [email protected]).

For questions or additional information, please contact [email protected].

For Further Information Contact

Please contact the Program Director of the individual summer program. Contact information for each of the SPUR programs can be found in the program description.

You may also contact the Diversity, Inclusion, and Admissions office at [email protected] .  You may also find program information in the UCLA Summer Programs for Undergraduate and Graduate Research Booklet .

How To Apply

You must submit an Online Application & Support Materials . Please make sure you submit a complete application by sending all pertinent supporting materials via mail or private carrier.

Additional Opportunities

Other Summer Programs for Undergraduate Research at UCLA.

LAUC

Current Initiatives

Climate ready trees.

research project la

In 2016, the LA Urban Center developed a research partnership with Loyola Marymount University’s Center for Urban Resilience to support the Los Angeles Stewardship Mapping and Assessment Project (LA STEW-MAP) . Led by LMU research scientist Dr. Michele Romolini, LA STEW-MAP is part of a national research program that seeks to answer the questions: Which environmental stewardship groups are working across urban landscapes? Where, why, how, and to what effect? STEW-MAP defines a “stewardship group” as a civic organization or group that works to conserve, manage, monitor, advocate for, and/or educate the public about their local environments. Through a web-based organizational survey, researchers gather information on the characteristics of stewardship groups, the locations of their stewardship activities, and how they collaborate and share information through networks. LA STEW-MAP results will offer an improved understanding of where and how environmental stewardship organizations are working in Los Angeles. One applied goal of the project is to use the data to produce resources including maps and reports that can be used by stewardship organizations.

research project la

Inspiring Engagement: Identifying Tree Stewardship Best Practices in Environmental Justice Areas

Combatting climate change requires a broad defense that includes reducing greenhouse gases while building an arsenal of green infrastructure. Disadvantaged, environmental justice communities are often the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Building up environmental assets, like trees, will help these communities develop resilience in the face of a changing climate. Edith De Guzman (TreePeople), Jennifer Tabanico, (Action Research, Community-Based Social Marketing) and Lori Large (California State University, Fullerton) aim to identify tree stewardship best practices in environmental justice areas. The goal of the study is to analyze factors that inhibit disadvantaged, environmental justice communities from building, maintaining, or advancing their urban forests through community based social marketing strategies.

View the Study >>

research project la

LA’s Urban Forest Since 1985, Understanding the Drought through Historical Satellite Data

Plant your street a research game exploring tree selection and placement in an urban neighborhood.

Enhancing urban tree canopy is largely dependent on neighborhood and residential plantings (Locke et al., 2010; O’Neil-Dunne, 2019). However, residential tree canopy in Los Angeles County is in decline (Lee et al., 2017). This project engaged visitors to public venues in the City of Los Angeles in a ‘plant your street’ research game, where they navigated a gameboard, depicting a neighborhood, including more public (e.g. a city park) and private areas, such as the understudied backyard (Cook et al., 2012).

Participants were told to imagine, as best they could, their own street and yard as they played, and then plant trees that were categorized by a prominent ecosystem service, with some (intentionally) more visible than others: fruit bearing, flowering, climate adaptive, and carbon capture. Three questions were explored: (1)What trees do people prefer around their homes and why? (2) Will the option of planting in different neighborhood areas influence preferences and placements? (3) Will tree descriptions, highlighting a prominent ecosystem service, be associated with selection and placement?

Participants “thought aloud” as they played the game. Their selections and placements, as well as their comments and reasoning, were documented, coded and analyzed. Results revealed that some trees were selected more often than others overall, and, within different neighborhood areas; for example, the majority of trees planted on the home lot were in the backyard. Themes underlying these decisions included: perceived tree services, self-versus other, and geography and personal connection.  Findings provide an improved understanding of urban tree planting preferences and may help inform residential tree planting programs.

research project la

Los Angeles Urban Forest Equity Collective

Greener and cooler: urban forest equity for a resilient los angeles 2020 – 2023.

Established in 2020, LA’s Urban Forest Equity Collective (UFEC) brings together a team of researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and community-based organizations to create a holistic analysis and implementation plan to advance urban forest equity in LA’s lowest-canopied neighborhoods, addressing decades of systemic disinvestment that have resulted in poor public health outcomes, limited access to green spaces, and a host of related consequences ranging from heat exposure and poor air quality, to food insecurity and reduced ecosystem services. Outcomes of this project will include a street-by-street classification of LA’s potential tree canopy in two pilot neighborhoods, applying the “tiered model” presented in Phase I of the Urban Forest Equity Visiting Scholar project , ranging from readily plantable to more difficult planting scenarios. This classification will be used to create neighborhood-level implementation plans that include costs and benefits of realizing the varied planting tiers, engage partnering community organizations in addressing barriers to deployment, and identify policy and funding pathways to ensure implementation. Connections to related efforts will be explored and forged, including to LA’s Urban Forest Management Plan, setting the course for the future of LA’s urban forest for years to come. This project will create a replicable framework that can be used regionally and beyond Los Angeles, and it will culminate with a demonstration of planting and increasing tree canopy in target neighborhoods following the tiered approach.

research project la

CEMO Blueprint (Institutionalizing Equity into Climate Governance in Los Angeles)

Institutionalizing Equity into Climate Governance in Los Angeles

Pumping plant LA water trading

The Regional Benefits of Water Trading in L.A. County as Recycled Water Production Increases

Solar Panel

Flexible Tandem Photovoltaic-Battery Device for Next Generation Concomitant Energy Harvesting and Storage 

Overview map of LA County and surrounding area assessing levels of human impact and protected areas

Biodiversity Atlas of LA

CA Water Recycling Facility

Direct Potable Reuse for Los Angeles County: Law and Policy Recommendations for Moving Forward

Solar panels

Integrated Spectral Leverage Amplification (iSLA) System for Thermal Solar Energy Harvesting

Water filtration device

Wastewater treatment plant of the future utilizing membrane bioreactors

Dry mountainside

Impacts and Implications of the 2012-2016 Drought for Los Angeles County Habitats and Energy Infrastructure 

Solar panels

Agent-Based Modeling of Solar Power Adoption by Los Angeles County Residents

LA Ariel View Ocean

Greater Los Angeles County Baseline Water Budget and Recommendations for Future Research

CONTACT US 

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Graduate and other research projects Institutional Review Board (IRB) request

Logo Institutional

"Research is to see what everybody has seen and think what nobody has thought." -Albert Szent-Györgyi [1]

Approved IRB Requests at LAVC (link)

LAVC supports the educational advancement of others and academic research that aids in critical inquiry of our practices and support of our students and employees. Whenever possible, we aim to support scholars who choose to center the work of community colleges and the impacted populations we serve.

Campus Approval

Each LACCD campus approves research studies using the centralized IRB process detailed below. LAVC considers each project based on the submission of the application materials and criteria below. LAVC OIE does not aid in subject recruitment, or the collection, coding, or analysis of data for research purposes. 

Graduate students with IRB approvals from other sites are still required to complete the LACCD process. To avoid delays or amendments, please review the documentation below and ensure that you have met our requirements prior to submission at your program campus.

Submissions may take several months for review. Please plan accordingly.

Required Documents

Applications below are for initial review of proposed research projects. Please ensure the appropriate form is used, based on the level of IRB review required for your research, and that the Institutional Approval Form is completed by the research office(s) of the campus(es)where the research will take place. If unsure about which which level of review is appropriate, please see above (More Information About the LACCD IRB link) or  click here  to be redirected to OHRP Decision Charts. If the application is incomplete, this will delay the review process.

  • LACCD IRB Procedures
  • LACCD APPLICATION FOR EXPEDITED AND FULL IRB REVIEW
  • LACCD APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM IRB REVIEW
  • Include your methodology chapter and related appendices in your submission of the Institutional Approval Form.
  • If a special program, department or population is being used as the focus of the study, the researcher must get endorsement from the appropriate area.
  • The submission of a final copy of the completed study and a brief summary of findings/implications for college use/reference is expected.

FAQs & Tips

Click below for Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and tips for a successful process.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

I already have an approved IRB/exemption from my 4-year institution, do I need to submit the LACCD application?

  • Yes, LACCD requires researchers to complete the forms below and submit an application if you plan to use LACCD campuses as sites or students and employees in your research.

Should I wait for my IRB approval from my 4-year institution before submitting?

  • You should complete a draft of your LACCD IRB application and make contact with the campus/district site(s) for consideration of your study, and to identify any issues early.
  • It is best to have insight on any additional LACCD site requirements prior to submitting your institution's IRB.

Can I use my Citi training from my 4-year institution?

  • Yes, in most cases you may submit your Citi Transcript to meet the training requirement.

Can I begin recruitment while I wait for approval?

  • No human subjects research can begin prior to the LACCD approval.
  • If your study involves a particular program or group of students, you should secure an endorsement for your research prior to submission of your application.

Planning Your Research

  • Contact us when you have a clear idea of your research methods, including your recruitment strategy. We will advise regarding any issues or considerations.
  • Plan ahead. Approvals often take longer than anticipated. Your study may require additional approvals or modifications.

Confidentiality

  • In general, the confidentiality of subjects and the site should be retained. Be explicit about the usage of pseudonyms and protections to maintain confidentiality in your study.

Informed Consent

  • Informed consent should explicitly state the independence of the research from the district and or campus. Any conducted by an employee needs to account for that employee's role relative to the participants and explicitly state the research purpose.

Recruitment

  • No email lists will be provided for recruitment.
  • LAVC OIE does not conduct study recruitment or provide emails lists for recruitment.
  • For usage of special programs and populations, please work with the leads in those areas for endorsement and to plan communication about your study. 

Sample Forms

Click below for samples:

Sample Consent Forms

  • LACCD Consent Form

LACCD Consent Form for Minors

Conducting Research at the Los Angeles Community College District

The Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) recognizes the important role of research as a method for building knowledge, as a means to understanding various issues, and as an approach to enhancing the services we provide to students. Because of this, we thank you for your interest in conducting research here. Our employees and students, as well external researchers, may be permitted to conduct research at the District providing that their work meets a certain standard of integrity, aligns with District’s mission and vision, and demonstrates a clear benefit to the District. To meet these criteria, the researcher must complete the following steps:

Complete Required Human Subjects Research Training

Obtain institutional approval, submit an irb application, maintain research protocol.

LACCD IRB site

Anyone wishing to conduct research within the District must complete Human Subjects Research Training. The training provides information about issues that may arise in the context of conducting research, with a focus on the protection of human subjects. The training is provided by CITI Program.

Please go the website https://about.citiprogram.org/en/homepage/

Register as an affiliate of the “Los Angeles Community College District” organization and create a username and password.  Enroll in and complete the training; you are not required to complete the modules in one sitting and your progress will be saved as long as you use your login information. If you are uncertain about whether you need to complete this training, please contact the college research office or LACCD IRB ([email protected]). Once this requirement is completed, you may proceed to step 2.

To obtain approval to conduct your investigation, you must complete the research review process (detailed above) conducted by College Institutional Effectiveness Office or the District Research Committee (DRC), if research is proposed across more than one LACCD campus. The purpose of this review process is to ensure that the proposed research meets a certain standard of integrity (e.g., having a clear research question, sound research design, appropriate methodology, etc.), is aligned with the District’s mission and vision, and demonstrates a clear benefit to the District.

Please note that this step, obtaining institutional approval, does not require the District to allow you access to their resources, nor does it negate the rights of subjects to decline participation. Approval from the College or DRC does mean that your proposal is methodologically sound and is likely to yield benefits to the District that outweigh any cost in resources.

The research review process entails determining the level of review that is required for your project and completing an application. There are resources available on the LACCD IRB Page and on the website for the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services ( https://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/regulations-and-policy/decision-charts/index.html ) to help you make a determination whether an activity is considered research or if the human subject research is eligible for Exemption.  If you are unsure, please contact the Office of Institutional Effectiveness on your campus or the IRB office ( @email ). Once you determine the level of review, complete the appropriate application (either “LACCD APPLICATION FOR EXEMPTION FROM IRB REVIEW” or “LACCD APPLICATION FOR EXPEDITED AND FULL IRB REVIEW”). Submit the IRB application to the Office of Institutional Effectiveness on your campus and they will do an initial review of the application. If the proposal is approved, the campus will complete the “Institutional Approval”

The IRB application, along with supporting documents, may be submitted electronically to the IRB office ( @email ). Depending on the level of review required, the application will be reviewed by the full committee or by an IRB representative.

The IRB will be responsible for reviewing proposed research projects that involves the use of human subjects; ensuring that the individuals involved in the project are treated ethically; ensure that all subjects are provided with substantial information about the study and consent to be a subject in the study; and ensuring that all private information will be handled with confidentiality.  Specifically, the IRB is charged with evaluating each project’s compliance with ethical standards in regard to issues such as informed consent, confidentiality, and any risk to the participants (i.e., 45 CFR 46 (the Common Rule) and the principles of the Belmont Report).

Once the application is reviewed, the primary investigator will be notified electronically regarding the disposition of their application. The research may only be conducted once IRB approval has been obtained.

Once your IRB application has been approved, your research protocol is valid for one year. Researchers are responsible for maintaining their research protocol current; this is accomplished by submitting necessary updates and forms to the IRB, such as an Amendment Application if an investigator wants to make changes to the already approved research protocol or an Adverse Event Reporting Form in case an adverse event occurs. If you wish to continue your research after this time frame, you will need to submit the Continuing Review Application to renew the research protocol for another year. Once your research has concluded, researchers are also asked to submit a Final Report Form that delineates information about your study and its findings.

Approved IRB Requests at LAVC

[ 1] Szent-Györgyi, A. (1957). Bioenergetics (p. 57). New York, Academic Press, Inc. Retrieved from: https://www.scribd.com/document/38515778/Albert-Szent-Gyorgyi-Bioenergetics on October 17, 2018.

Lockwood Carhart

LA BIOMED MASTERPLAN TORRENCE, CALIFORNIA

Project Type Medical Research Project Designer John Lockwood Carhart Architect of Record ZGF Architects, Los Angeles

   The Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA Biomed) is a world-renowned non-profit scientific research organization that is dedicated to saving lives throughout the world. The institute is located on the 10 acre Harbor-UCLA medical center campus.

   The program called for a new vision for the campus that would incorporate 3 new 80,000 square foot laboratory buildings, a campus commons, formal campus entrance, and large-scale outdoor spaces. The new buildings were required to connect functionally with several of the existing buildings that would later be torn down as part of the long-term masterplan.  John’s design organizes the new buildings strategically to form large-scale campus spaces which allow for social interaction and various recreational uses.

   Connectivity between buildings is established by an elevated passageway, or spine, which connects each building to each other and extends eastward to a future parking garage.

   John’s role on the masterplan was to initiate all design ideas and strategies and to work collaboratively with the firm’s partners, team members and consultants.

research project la

Image of 135th Faculty Research Lecturer Dana Cuff

Can ‘urban humanism’ reverse L.A.’s housing crisis? In some ways, it already has

On March 7, Dana Cuff will discuss architecture’s ability to design more equitable futures at UCLA’s Faculty Research Lecture.

Featured Stories

Wide shot of the exterior of the property from Pico Boulevard

UCLA to transform former Westside Pavilion into UCLA Research Park

With the acquisition, UCLA will create an engine of innovation, discovery and economic growth for Southern California and beyond.

NAE-Electees

3 UCLA faculty elected to National Academy of Engineering

Academy membership recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to engineering research, practice or education.

Free electron wave packets being produced using a photoinjector for attosecond X-ray imaging of molecular motion

The UCLA Research Park: Quantum science and engineering

The quantum innovation hub will produce advances in computing, sensing and other areas while training a new workforce for the burgeoning field.

Researcher in white lab coat and gloves works at computer with medical samples behind her

The UCLA Research Park: Immunology and immunotherapy

At the new research park, the California Institute for Immunology and Immunotherapy at UCLA is poised to enter a new era of biomedical breakthroughs.

Collage of faculty members - Left to right - Eric Chiou, Paul Weiss and Xiangfeng Duan.jpg

3 UCLA faculty members named to National Academy of Inventors

Professors Eric Chiou, Paul S. Weiss and Xiangfeng Duan were honored for “creating innovations that are driving crucial advancements across a variety of disciplines.”

A white-tailed crested flycatcher held by a UCLA researcher

As the climate warms, birds in the East Africa mountains are getting bigger

UCLA-led research casts doubt on a long-held theory about warming and body size.

Jezero crater delta copy

Confirmation of ancient lake on Mars builds excitement for Perseverance rover’s samples

Findings reveal eons of environmental changes and offer hope that soil and rock samples hold traces of life.

A woman breastfeeds while working at a computer

3 strategies to break down barriers to breastfeeding and lower women’s risk of breast cancer

UCLA Center for Health Policy Research report recommends changes to laws and a more diverse lactation consultant workforce.

One Billion Dollars.

That’s the average amount UCLA has received to fund research projects each year since 2009-10.

UCLA research and creative activities have generated some of the most transformative breakthroughs in modern times. From revolutionizing medical diagnostics and treatment to laying the framework to create the Internet or reshaping our understanding of the human condition, UCLA's research impact extends around the globe. 

As one of the world’s top research universities, UCLA has the intellectual capital and extensive research facilities necessary to tackle society’s most challenging issues. And as a public research university, we take seriously our mission to develop solutions that improve the quality of life in our community, our country and around the world. Included among our faculty, alumni and researchers are 14 Nobel Prize winners, 13 faculty MacArthur Fellows, a Fields medalist, two Turing Award winners, and three Pulitzer Prize winners. Explore our site to learn more about us, research highlights, resources for researchers, how to engage with UCLA research and our initiatives.

ORCA Website_Homepage_Stats_Final_As of 11.01.22

Organization of Research Enterprise

Experienced teams provide support services to enable researchers to pursue inquiries and discovery.

Learn more about the subsidiary offices that help to administer and support research and creative activities conducted at UCLA.

UCLA Research in the Newsroom

Newsroom’s top videos: wooden’s stamp on history, bruinettes pride and more, diversity in demand: people of color, women – in audience and on the big screen – hold keys to industry survival, ‘i feel like myself again’: ucla clinical trial offers hope for lymphoma patients, women on history, today’s realities and visions for the future.

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Campus Announcements

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  • How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates

How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates

Published on October 12, 2022 by Shona McCombes and Tegan George. Revised on November 21, 2023.

Structure of a research proposal

A research proposal describes what you will investigate, why it’s important, and how you will conduct your research.

The format of a research proposal varies between fields, but most proposals will contain at least these elements:

Introduction

Literature review.

  • Research design

Reference list

While the sections may vary, the overall objective is always the same. A research proposal serves as a blueprint and guide for your research plan, helping you get organized and feel confident in the path forward you choose to take.

Table of contents

Research proposal purpose, research proposal examples, research design and methods, contribution to knowledge, research schedule, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about research proposals.

Academics often have to write research proposals to get funding for their projects. As a student, you might have to write a research proposal as part of a grad school application , or prior to starting your thesis or dissertation .

In addition to helping you figure out what your research can look like, a proposal can also serve to demonstrate why your project is worth pursuing to a funder, educational institution, or supervisor.

Research proposal length

The length of a research proposal can vary quite a bit. A bachelor’s or master’s thesis proposal can be just a few pages, while proposals for PhD dissertations or research funding are usually much longer and more detailed. Your supervisor can help you determine the best length for your work.

One trick to get started is to think of your proposal’s structure as a shorter version of your thesis or dissertation , only without the results , conclusion and discussion sections.

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Writing a research proposal can be quite challenging, but a good starting point could be to look at some examples. We’ve included a few for you below.

  • Example research proposal #1: “A Conceptual Framework for Scheduling Constraint Management”
  • Example research proposal #2: “Medical Students as Mediators of Change in Tobacco Use”

Like your dissertation or thesis, the proposal will usually have a title page that includes:

  • The proposed title of your project
  • Your supervisor’s name
  • Your institution and department

The first part of your proposal is the initial pitch for your project. Make sure it succinctly explains what you want to do and why.

Your introduction should:

  • Introduce your topic
  • Give necessary background and context
  • Outline your  problem statement  and research questions

To guide your introduction , include information about:

  • Who could have an interest in the topic (e.g., scientists, policymakers)
  • How much is already known about the topic
  • What is missing from this current knowledge
  • What new insights your research will contribute
  • Why you believe this research is worth doing

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As you get started, it’s important to demonstrate that you’re familiar with the most important research on your topic. A strong literature review  shows your reader that your project has a solid foundation in existing knowledge or theory. It also shows that you’re not simply repeating what other people have already done or said, but rather using existing research as a jumping-off point for your own.

In this section, share exactly how your project will contribute to ongoing conversations in the field by:

  • Comparing and contrasting the main theories, methods, and debates
  • Examining the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches
  • Explaining how will you build on, challenge, or synthesize prior scholarship

Following the literature review, restate your main  objectives . This brings the focus back to your own project. Next, your research design or methodology section will describe your overall approach, and the practical steps you will take to answer your research questions.

To finish your proposal on a strong note, explore the potential implications of your research for your field. Emphasize again what you aim to contribute and why it matters.

For example, your results might have implications for:

  • Improving best practices
  • Informing policymaking decisions
  • Strengthening a theory or model
  • Challenging popular or scientific beliefs
  • Creating a basis for future research

Last but not least, your research proposal must include correct citations for every source you have used, compiled in a reference list . To create citations quickly and easily, you can use our free APA citation generator .

Some institutions or funders require a detailed timeline of the project, asking you to forecast what you will do at each stage and how long it may take. While not always required, be sure to check the requirements of your project.

Here’s an example schedule to help you get started. You can also download a template at the button below.

Download our research schedule template

If you are applying for research funding, chances are you will have to include a detailed budget. This shows your estimates of how much each part of your project will cost.

Make sure to check what type of costs the funding body will agree to cover. For each item, include:

  • Cost : exactly how much money do you need?
  • Justification : why is this cost necessary to complete the research?
  • Source : how did you calculate the amount?

To determine your budget, think about:

  • Travel costs : do you need to go somewhere to collect your data? How will you get there, and how much time will you need? What will you do there (e.g., interviews, archival research)?
  • Materials : do you need access to any tools or technologies?
  • Help : do you need to hire any research assistants for the project? What will they do, and how much will you pay them?

If you want to know more about the research process , methodology , research bias , or statistics , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Methodology

  • Sampling methods
  • Simple random sampling
  • Stratified sampling
  • Cluster sampling
  • Likert scales
  • Reproducibility

 Statistics

  • Null hypothesis
  • Statistical power
  • Probability distribution
  • Effect size
  • Poisson distribution

Research bias

  • Optimism bias
  • Cognitive bias
  • Implicit bias
  • Hawthorne effect
  • Anchoring bias
  • Explicit bias

Once you’ve decided on your research objectives , you need to explain them in your paper, at the end of your problem statement .

Keep your research objectives clear and concise, and use appropriate verbs to accurately convey the work that you will carry out for each one.

I will compare …

A research aim is a broad statement indicating the general purpose of your research project. It should appear in your introduction at the end of your problem statement , before your research objectives.

Research objectives are more specific than your research aim. They indicate the specific ways you’ll address the overarching aim.

A PhD, which is short for philosophiae doctor (doctor of philosophy in Latin), is the highest university degree that can be obtained. In a PhD, students spend 3–5 years writing a dissertation , which aims to make a significant, original contribution to current knowledge.

A PhD is intended to prepare students for a career as a researcher, whether that be in academia, the public sector, or the private sector.

A master’s is a 1- or 2-year graduate degree that can prepare you for a variety of careers.

All master’s involve graduate-level coursework. Some are research-intensive and intend to prepare students for further study in a PhD; these usually require their students to write a master’s thesis . Others focus on professional training for a specific career.

Critical thinking refers to the ability to evaluate information and to be aware of biases or assumptions, including your own.

Like information literacy , it involves evaluating arguments, identifying and solving problems in an objective and systematic way, and clearly communicating your ideas.

The best way to remember the difference between a research plan and a research proposal is that they have fundamentally different audiences. A research plan helps you, the researcher, organize your thoughts. On the other hand, a dissertation proposal or research proposal aims to convince others (e.g., a supervisor, a funding body, or a dissertation committee) that your research topic is relevant and worthy of being conducted.

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McCombes, S. & George, T. (2023, November 21). How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates. Scribbr. Retrieved March 14, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/research-process/research-proposal/

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Home » Research Project – Definition, Writing Guide and Ideas

Research Project – Definition, Writing Guide and Ideas

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Research Project

Research Project

Definition :

Research Project is a planned and systematic investigation into a specific area of interest or problem, with the goal of generating new knowledge, insights, or solutions. It typically involves identifying a research question or hypothesis, designing a study to test it, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions based on the findings.

Types of Research Project

Types of Research Projects are as follows:

Basic Research

This type of research focuses on advancing knowledge and understanding of a subject area or phenomenon, without any specific application or practical use in mind. The primary goal is to expand scientific or theoretical knowledge in a particular field.

Applied Research

Applied research is aimed at solving practical problems or addressing specific issues. This type of research seeks to develop solutions or improve existing products, services or processes.

Action Research

Action research is conducted by practitioners and aimed at solving specific problems or improving practices in a particular context. It involves collaboration between researchers and practitioners, and often involves iterative cycles of data collection and analysis, with the goal of improving practices.

Quantitative Research

This type of research uses numerical data to investigate relationships between variables or to test hypotheses. It typically involves large-scale data collection through surveys, experiments, or secondary data analysis.

Qualitative Research

Qualitative research focuses on understanding and interpreting phenomena from the perspective of the people involved. It involves collecting and analyzing data in the form of text, images, or other non-numerical forms.

Mixed Methods Research

Mixed methods research combines elements of both quantitative and qualitative research, using multiple data sources and methods to gain a more comprehensive understanding of a phenomenon.

Longitudinal Research

This type of research involves studying a group of individuals or phenomena over an extended period of time, often years or decades. It is useful for understanding changes and developments over time.

Case Study Research

Case study research involves in-depth investigation of a particular case or phenomenon, often within a specific context. It is useful for understanding complex phenomena in their real-life settings.

Participatory Research

Participatory research involves active involvement of the people or communities being studied in the research process. It emphasizes collaboration, empowerment, and the co-production of knowledge.

Research Project Methodology

Research Project Methodology refers to the process of conducting research in an organized and systematic manner to answer a specific research question or to test a hypothesis. A well-designed research project methodology ensures that the research is rigorous, valid, and reliable, and that the findings are meaningful and can be used to inform decision-making.

There are several steps involved in research project methodology, which are described below:

Define the Research Question

The first step in any research project is to clearly define the research question or problem. This involves identifying the purpose of the research, the scope of the research, and the key variables that will be studied.

Develop a Research Plan

Once the research question has been defined, the next step is to develop a research plan. This plan outlines the methodology that will be used to collect and analyze data, including the research design, sampling strategy, data collection methods, and data analysis techniques.

Collect Data

The data collection phase involves gathering information through various methods, such as surveys, interviews, observations, experiments, or secondary data analysis. The data collected should be relevant to the research question and should be of sufficient quantity and quality to enable meaningful analysis.

Analyze Data

Once the data has been collected, it is analyzed using appropriate statistical techniques or other methods. The analysis should be guided by the research question and should aim to identify patterns, trends, relationships, or other insights that can inform the research findings.

Interpret and Report Findings

The final step in the research project methodology is to interpret the findings and report them in a clear and concise manner. This involves summarizing the results, discussing their implications, and drawing conclusions that can be used to inform decision-making.

Research Project Writing Guide

Here are some guidelines to help you in writing a successful research project:

  • Choose a topic: Choose a topic that you are interested in and that is relevant to your field of study. It is important to choose a topic that is specific and focused enough to allow for in-depth research and analysis.
  • Conduct a literature review : Conduct a thorough review of the existing research on your topic. This will help you to identify gaps in the literature and to develop a research question or hypothesis.
  • Develop a research question or hypothesis : Based on your literature review, develop a clear research question or hypothesis that you will investigate in your study.
  • Design your study: Choose an appropriate research design and methodology to answer your research question or test your hypothesis. This may include choosing a sample, selecting measures or instruments, and determining data collection methods.
  • Collect data: Collect data using your chosen methods and instruments. Be sure to follow ethical guidelines and obtain informed consent from participants if necessary.
  • Analyze data: Analyze your data using appropriate statistical or qualitative methods. Be sure to clearly report your findings and provide interpretations based on your research question or hypothesis.
  • Discuss your findings : Discuss your findings in the context of the existing literature and your research question or hypothesis. Identify any limitations or implications of your study and suggest directions for future research.
  • Write your project: Write your research project in a clear and organized manner, following the appropriate format and style guidelines for your field of study. Be sure to include an introduction, literature review, methodology, results, discussion, and conclusion.
  • Revise and edit: Revise and edit your project for clarity, coherence, and accuracy. Be sure to proofread for spelling, grammar, and formatting errors.
  • Cite your sources: Cite your sources accurately and appropriately using the appropriate citation style for your field of study.

Examples of Research Projects

Some Examples of Research Projects are as follows:

  • Investigating the effects of a new medication on patients with a particular disease or condition.
  • Exploring the impact of exercise on mental health and well-being.
  • Studying the effectiveness of a new teaching method in improving student learning outcomes.
  • Examining the impact of social media on political participation and engagement.
  • Investigating the efficacy of a new therapy for a specific mental health disorder.
  • Exploring the use of renewable energy sources in reducing carbon emissions and mitigating climate change.
  • Studying the effects of a new agricultural technique on crop yields and environmental sustainability.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of a new technology in improving business productivity and efficiency.
  • Examining the impact of a new public policy on social inequality and access to resources.
  • Exploring the factors that influence consumer behavior in a specific market.

Characteristics of Research Project

Here are some of the characteristics that are often associated with research projects:

  • Clear objective: A research project is designed to answer a specific question or solve a particular problem. The objective of the research should be clearly defined from the outset.
  • Systematic approach: A research project is typically carried out using a structured and systematic approach that involves careful planning, data collection, analysis, and interpretation.
  • Rigorous methodology: A research project should employ a rigorous methodology that is appropriate for the research question being investigated. This may involve the use of statistical analysis, surveys, experiments, or other methods.
  • Data collection : A research project involves collecting data from a variety of sources, including primary sources (such as surveys or experiments) and secondary sources (such as published literature or databases).
  • Analysis and interpretation : Once the data has been collected, it needs to be analyzed and interpreted. This involves using statistical techniques or other methods to identify patterns or relationships in the data.
  • Conclusion and implications : A research project should lead to a clear conclusion that answers the research question. It should also identify the implications of the findings for future research or practice.
  • Communication: The results of the research project should be communicated clearly and effectively, using appropriate language and visual aids, to a range of audiences, including peers, stakeholders, and the wider public.

Importance of Research Project

Research projects are an essential part of the process of generating new knowledge and advancing our understanding of various fields of study. Here are some of the key reasons why research projects are important:

  • Advancing knowledge : Research projects are designed to generate new knowledge and insights into particular topics or questions. This knowledge can be used to inform policies, practices, and decision-making processes across a range of fields.
  • Solving problems: Research projects can help to identify solutions to real-world problems by providing a better understanding of the causes and effects of particular issues.
  • Developing new technologies: Research projects can lead to the development of new technologies or products that can improve people’s lives or address societal challenges.
  • Improving health outcomes: Research projects can contribute to improving health outcomes by identifying new treatments, diagnostic tools, or preventive strategies.
  • Enhancing education: Research projects can enhance education by providing new insights into teaching and learning methods, curriculum development, and student learning outcomes.
  • Informing public policy : Research projects can inform public policy by providing evidence-based recommendations and guidance on issues related to health, education, environment, social justice, and other areas.
  • Enhancing professional development : Research projects can enhance the professional development of researchers by providing opportunities to develop new skills, collaborate with colleagues, and share knowledge with others.

Research Project Ideas

Following are some Research Project Ideas:

Field: Psychology

  • Investigating the impact of social support on coping strategies among individuals with chronic illnesses.
  • Exploring the relationship between childhood trauma and adult attachment styles.
  • Examining the effects of exercise on cognitive function and brain health in older adults.
  • Investigating the impact of sleep deprivation on decision making and risk-taking behavior.
  • Exploring the relationship between personality traits and leadership styles in the workplace.
  • Examining the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating anxiety disorders.
  • Investigating the relationship between social comparison and body dissatisfaction in young women.
  • Exploring the impact of parenting styles on children’s emotional regulation and behavior.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for treating depression.
  • Examining the relationship between childhood adversity and later-life health outcomes.

Field: Economics

  • Analyzing the impact of trade agreements on economic growth in developing countries.
  • Examining the effects of tax policy on income distribution and poverty reduction.
  • Investigating the relationship between foreign aid and economic development in low-income countries.
  • Exploring the impact of globalization on labor markets and job displacement.
  • Analyzing the impact of minimum wage laws on employment and income levels.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of monetary policy in managing inflation and unemployment.
  • Examining the relationship between economic freedom and entrepreneurship.
  • Analyzing the impact of income inequality on social mobility and economic opportunity.
  • Investigating the role of education in economic development.
  • Examining the effectiveness of different healthcare financing systems in promoting health equity.

Field: Sociology

  • Investigating the impact of social media on political polarization and civic engagement.
  • Examining the effects of neighborhood characteristics on health outcomes.
  • Analyzing the impact of immigration policies on social integration and cultural diversity.
  • Investigating the relationship between social support and mental health outcomes in older adults.
  • Exploring the impact of income inequality on social cohesion and trust.
  • Analyzing the effects of gender and race discrimination on career advancement and pay equity.
  • Investigating the relationship between social networks and health behaviors.
  • Examining the effectiveness of community-based interventions for reducing crime and violence.
  • Analyzing the impact of social class on cultural consumption and taste.
  • Investigating the relationship between religious affiliation and social attitudes.

Field: Computer Science

  • Developing an algorithm for detecting fake news on social media.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different machine learning algorithms for image recognition.
  • Developing a natural language processing tool for sentiment analysis of customer reviews.
  • Analyzing the security implications of blockchain technology for online transactions.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different recommendation algorithms for personalized advertising.
  • Developing an artificial intelligence chatbot for mental health counseling.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different algorithms for optimizing online advertising campaigns.
  • Developing a machine learning model for predicting consumer behavior in online marketplaces.
  • Analyzing the privacy implications of different data sharing policies for online platforms.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different algorithms for predicting stock market trends.

Field: Education

  • Investigating the impact of teacher-student relationships on academic achievement.
  • Analyzing the effectiveness of different pedagogical approaches for promoting student engagement and motivation.
  • Examining the effects of school choice policies on academic achievement and social mobility.
  • Investigating the impact of technology on learning outcomes and academic achievement.
  • Analyzing the effects of school funding disparities on educational equity and achievement gaps.
  • Investigating the relationship between school climate and student mental health outcomes.
  • Examining the effectiveness of different teaching strategies for promoting critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
  • Investigating the impact of social-emotional learning programs on student behavior and academic achievement.
  • Analyzing the effects of standardized testing on student motivation and academic achievement.

Field: Environmental Science

  • Investigating the impact of climate change on species distribution and biodiversity.
  • Analyzing the effectiveness of different renewable energy technologies in reducing carbon emissions.
  • Examining the impact of air pollution on human health outcomes.
  • Investigating the relationship between urbanization and deforestation in developing countries.
  • Analyzing the effects of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems and biodiversity.
  • Investigating the impact of land use change on soil fertility and ecosystem services.
  • Analyzing the effectiveness of different conservation policies and programs for protecting endangered species and habitats.
  • Investigating the relationship between climate change and water resources in arid regions.
  • Examining the impact of plastic pollution on marine ecosystems and biodiversity.
  • Investigating the effects of different agricultural practices on soil health and nutrient cycling.

Field: Linguistics

  • Analyzing the impact of language diversity on social integration and cultural identity.
  • Investigating the relationship between language and cognition in bilingual individuals.
  • Examining the effects of language contact and language change on linguistic diversity.
  • Investigating the role of language in shaping cultural norms and values.
  • Analyzing the effectiveness of different language teaching methodologies for second language acquisition.
  • Investigating the relationship between language proficiency and academic achievement.
  • Examining the impact of language policy on language use and language attitudes.
  • Investigating the role of language in shaping gender and social identities.
  • Analyzing the effects of dialect contact on language variation and change.
  • Investigating the relationship between language and emotion expression.

Field: Political Science

  • Analyzing the impact of electoral systems on women’s political representation.
  • Investigating the relationship between political ideology and attitudes towards immigration.
  • Examining the effects of political polarization on democratic institutions and political stability.
  • Investigating the impact of social media on political participation and civic engagement.
  • Analyzing the effects of authoritarianism on human rights and civil liberties.
  • Investigating the relationship between public opinion and foreign policy decisions.
  • Examining the impact of international organizations on global governance and cooperation.
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different conflict resolution strategies in resolving ethnic and religious conflicts.
  • Analyzing the effects of corruption on economic development and political stability.
  • Investigating the role of international law in regulating global governance and human rights.

Field: Medicine

  • Investigating the impact of lifestyle factors on chronic disease risk and prevention.
  • Examining the effectiveness of different treatment approaches for mental health disorders.
  • Investigating the relationship between genetics and disease susceptibility.
  • Analyzing the effects of social determinants of health on health outcomes and health disparities.
  • Investigating the impact of different healthcare delivery models on patient outcomes and cost effectiveness.
  • Examining the effectiveness of different prevention and treatment strategies for infectious diseases.
  • Investigating the relationship between healthcare provider communication skills and patient satisfaction and outcomes.
  • Analyzing the effects of medical error and patient safety on healthcare quality and outcomes.
  • Investigating the impact of different pharmaceutical pricing policies on access to essential medicines.
  • Examining the effectiveness of different rehabilitation approaches for improving function and quality of life in individuals with disabilities.

Field: Anthropology

  • Analyzing the impact of colonialism on indigenous cultures and identities.
  • Investigating the relationship between cultural practices and health outcomes in different populations.
  • Examining the effects of globalization on cultural diversity and cultural exchange.
  • Investigating the role of language in cultural transmission and preservation.
  • Analyzing the effects of cultural contact on cultural change and adaptation.
  • Investigating the impact of different migration policies on immigrant integration and acculturation.
  • Examining the role of gender and sexuality in cultural norms and values.
  • Investigating the impact of cultural heritage preservation on tourism and economic development.
  • Analyzing the effects of cultural revitalization movements on indigenous communities.

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$2-billion downtown L.A. mega-project gets boost from governor’s office, hopes for approval in 2024

An aerial view of the area neighboring Central Avenue and 4th Street downtown

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Gov. Gavin Newsom will attempt to expedite construction of a $2-billion residential and commercial mega-development in downtown Los Angeles, his administration announced Thursday.

The 7.6-acre project, named Fourth & Central, would bring 1,500 new homes, 410,000 square feet of office space along with retail, restaurants and a 68-room hotel to what’s now a collection of cold storage facilities, parking lots and warehouses in Skid Row near its boundary with the Arts District. Newsom’s decision Thursday aims to shave years off the construction timeline by fast-tracking a judicial decision in any litigation filed against the project under state environmental laws.

“For decades, we’ve let red tape stand in the way of these kinds of critical housing projects — and the consequences are in plain view all around us,” Newsom said in a statement. “Now we’re using California’s infrastructure law to build more housing, faster.”

Denver-based developers Continuum Partners unveiled the project in 2021 . It’s made up of 10 buildings, including a 44-story residential skyscraper at Central Avenue and 4th Street. In total, the proposal calls for 572 condominiums and 949 apartments, with at least 214 units set aside as low-income housing.

Fourth & Central aerial view at dusk. Master planning and project architecture by Studio One Eleven, with tower at right by Adjaye Associates.

A $2-billion mega-project could reshape the Arts District

A cold storage plant in Los Angeles’ Arts District would be replaced with housing, offices, a hotel and shops in a proposed mega-development called Fourth & Central.

April 29, 2021

Two marquee buildings including the high-rise were designed by Ghanaian-British architect David Adjaye, best known as the lead designer of the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington. The developer is partnering with Los Angeles Cold Storage Co., which has been operating on the site since 1895 and has provided refrigerated warehousing to many of the produce markets, hotels and buildings in the region.

Edgar Khalatian, an attorney with the firm Mayer Brown that is representing Continuum, called Fourth & Central a “transformative” project for Los Angeles, highlighting the plan to bring lots more housing and jobs to core neighborhoods.

“Housing folks at all income levels near transit and job centers should be all municipalities’ vision,” Khalatian said.

Thursday’s decision is one of multiple announcements this week that show the project’s timeline is ramping up. On Tuesday, Continuum publicized an agreement with the Los Angeles/Orange Counties Building and Construction Trades Council, an umbrella group of construction worker unions, to build Fourth & Central with all union labor, including requirements that workers be hired locally. Newsom’s office estimated that the project would create as many as 10,000 construction jobs.

The project still requires approval from the Los Angeles City Council, which Khalatian said the developer is hoping for by the end of the year. Construction would follow next year and take five to seven years to complete, he said.

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr, left, and forward Kevin Durant, second from left, speak during a groundbreaking ceremony for the Chase Center in San Francisco on Jan. 17.

A key reform of California’s landmark environmental law hasn’t kept its promises

It took until the morning the Golden State Warriors broke ground on their new professional basketball arena in San Francisco last week for the lawsuits against the project to end.

Jan. 24, 2017

The expedited litigation timeline does not exempt the project from analysis under the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, the 1970 law that requires developers to identify and, if possible, eliminate negative environmental effects.

However, it would shorten the length of any potential lawsuit against the project. Litigation under CEQA has long been blamed for killing or dragging out construction, especially for large developments. Thursday’s action aims to wrap up litigation within nine months instead of what’s typically three to five years.

Khalatian said the rules will provide major benefits for Continuum in terms of cost savings and development certainty while not diminishing the rights of possible opponents.

“There’s really nothing negative for anybody except for a petitioner, and even for a petitioner it’s just their lawyer has to work weekends,” he said.

Fourth & Central aerial view at dusk. Master planning and project architecture b

There are expected to be challenges to the project, environmental or otherwise. Residents and activists in Skid Row and nearby Little Tokyo have long been concerned about gentrification as Arts District development has marched west.

The project’s website advertises Fourth & Central as “the New Gateway to DTLA.” A map on the site doesn’t mention Skid Row, instead prominently featuring the Arts District and referring to the surrounding area as the Fashion and Toy districts.

Multiple organizations in Little Tokyo have been tracking Fourth & Central through its planning and environmental applications and are worried about its potential to exacerbate displacement of low-income residents and erode the neighborhood’s role as the historic center of the region’s Japanese community.

“There is a desire that this project be part of the community and hope that we can figure something out,” said Grant Sunoo, director of community building and engagement at the Little Tokyo Service Center, a nonprofit social service and community development organization. “There’s skepticism as to whether it’s possible. It’s not just Little Tokyo that’s impacted, it’s these other neighborhoods too, especially Skid Row.”

A photo collage featuring photographs from Skid Row's troubled housing providers.

The Times’ investigations into Skid Row’s troubled housing providers

Recently, The Times has been investigating Skid Row’s troubled housing providers, digging into the failures of nonprofits such as AIDS Healthcare Foundation.

Nov. 17, 2023

Khalatian, the attorney representing Continuum, said Fourth & Central is in line with the city’s recently approved blueprint for downtown development and will add to the area’s existing fabric.

“We’re building a project that has multiple access points into the community, that’s built outwards toward the surrounding community and that’s near transit with significant affordable housing,” Khalatian said.

Fourth & Central is the third development to receive the governor’s approval to fast-track its CEQA litigation in recent months, following the proposed Sites Reservoir in the Sacramento Valley and a renewable energy project in Riverside.

Efforts to streamline environmental lawsuits for mega-developments go back to 2011 when then-Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation implementing the plan as a job creation strategy during the Great Recession. The process does not guarantee that projects get built. Multiple sports stadiums including the Farmers Field football proposal at the Los Angeles Convention Center have received the benefit but never broke ground.

Last year, owners of 8150 Sunset, a Frank Gehry-designed residential and commercial skyscraper along the eastern edge of the Sunset Strip that qualified in 2014, put the site up for sale without commencing development.

Times staff writer Roger Vincent contributed to this report.

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Raza Database Project

Raza Database

Welcome to the Raza Database Project

The Raza Killings Database is a collaborative project that seeks to better accurately count the list of killings of Raza by those in a law enforcement capacity in the United States. Although Congress instructed the Attorney General in 1994 to compile and publish annual statistics on police use of excessive force, this was never carried out, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation does not collect these data either. Simply, there is no good official data.

In its place are multiple and incomplete lists published by various non-governmental organizations and agencies, but most often the numbers show how many total killings per year are recorded in the lists, not the actual number of people killed by law enforcement. Although many current listings document the occurrence of a death, they make no implications regarding wrongdoing or justification on the part of the person killed or officer involved. The data is extremely flawed with respect to age, race–ethnicity, and sex. There's no standardization of how people are labeled and there's no centralization.

There is neither any law enforcement accountability nor is there any justice for the families that have experienced these horrors. This is further compounded by the fact that Raza are rarely mentioned when discussing violent police treatment.

This national coalition is made up of families of the deceased, survivors of law enforcement brutality, community leaders and social justice advocates, researchers and academics, data analysts and demographers, and multiple national-level collaborative partners - all committed to build power against systemic violence in all its forms.

Taking the LEAD!

Latino Education and Advocacy Days (LEAD) serves as a leading national-level project collaborator for this meta-analytical research on Police Shootings/Killings. We hope that our new LEAD Media Studios can serve as the national touch-point for media programming and so forth.  Our strategy will absolutely put the focus on Raza deaths because the data has always been there, but most often, these killings do not ever sufficiently rise to the level of a national conversation nor command the necessary media or governmental attention. 

Watch on "We Were All Mistaken" on Youtube  

Why It Matters

Our preliminary analysis shows that People of Color killed by Law Enforcement are undercounted! The number of Latinos and Black people killed while in police custody is likely much higher than reported by the media and national lists - perhaps by more than double.

Why it matters - a year after George Floyd’s death, data on Latinos killed by police or while in police custody remain scarce. We estimate that over 2,600 Latinos have died at the hands of police since 2014, more than double what had previously been known. Plus, a Latino ethnicity is not plainly visible since "Hispanics" can be of any race, and often get lumped into “other” or “unknown” categories.

This analysis permits several other conclusions.  People of color, who together constitute less than 40% of the U.S. population, comprise more than 60% of all people killed by or who died in the custody of the police. By comparison, Whites, who constitute more than 60% of the population, comprise less than 40% of all deaths over the 2014-2021 period.

We dug into the undercounting of Latino victims by also looking at a person’s last name and other characteristics. Even the adjusted numbers likely understate the disparity, since significant numbers of Latinos have “European” surnames not captured by the surname match and would not be identified by this analysis.

Finally, in the absence of an official government database, additional research is required to produce a more accurate identification of Latinos and others not identified by existing datasets.

In addition - there is still some 6,000 people "unidentified", and for the final report, we still need to work out the Border Patrol & Immigration Killings and also murdered & missing indigenous, African American, and migrant women.

We need to understand that the police have near impunity and are so rarely held accountable for killings - all they have to say is that they feared for their life. The problem is that these killings are way out of proportion in relation to any other forms of death. Because of the unknown and hidden. Then after a killing, we as a society just move on to other things. But neither the victims nor the families are able to move on.

In addition, while most of those killed by law-enforcement are male, there is an equal crisis, involving the deaths and disappearances of Native, African-American and migrant women, which cases are rarely investigated, thus more impunity. Killings by immigration officers or people who die in their custody (more than 100 in the past 10 years) - are also high; the commonality with law enforcement killings is the near 100% impunity. No immigration agent has ever been convicted for the death of a migrant, many of whom are also native.

Executive Summary - Final Report

Unjustified violence in the United States, whether carried out by law enforcement, the military, immigration agents or by vigilantes, especially against people of color, has been endemic and can be traced to even before the nation’s founding, to the arrival of Columbus to this hemisphere. In the US, racial conflict has largely played out in black and white. Americans tend to not know the extensive history of Mexicans, Chicanos, Raza in the United States and our struggle for civil rights. 

The national focus on Brown issues is too limited. It often revolves solely around immigration, particularly undocumented immigrants. The Indigenous Based peoples are viewed and treated as less than human. This racialized violence in its current forms includes torture, false imprisonment, mass incarceration, shootings, vicious beatings, harassment, kidnappings and rape. 

Historically, this violence has generally been carried out for purposes of social control, especially within the past generation in which tens of thousands of people have been killed or have died at the hands of these State Sponsored criminals. This also includes the rising vigilante violence against Asians and violence against Native, African American and migrant women. 

La Raza Database Research Project, founded and Directed by the late Roberto “Dr. Cintli” Rodriguez (†), is a volunteer based collaborative project with the Latino Education and Advocacy Days Organization (LEAD) at Cal State San Bernardino to investigate the undercount and inaccuracies reported of the deaths of people of color, with a focus on Raza deaths by law enforcement in the United States. 

Although Congress instructed the Attorney General in 1994 to compile and publish annual statistics on police use of excessive force, this was never carried out, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation does not collect these data either. Simply, there is no good official data. 

There is neither any law enforcement accountability nor is there any justice for the people and their families who have experienced these horrifying injustices. This is further compounded by the fact that Raza deaths are rarely mentioned when discussing human and civil rights violations by law enforcement.

The nonexistence of a comprehensive standardized and centralized Federal Database leads to an inaccurate reporting of these deaths which results in an over 98% rate of impunity. 

The number of Brown and Black people killed in Presence of/Killings by Law Enforcement is much higher than reported by the media and national lists - perhaps by more than double. 

La Raza Database team has looked into the undercounting of deaths by collecting information from publicly available open-sources.

One salient feature about all databases examined is that Brown peoples are often shoved into either the "unknown" or the "White" racial categories, and often also, unidentified altogether, resulting in huge undercounts and thus, invisibilization. That has been one of the most challenging items, determining the race/ethnic origin of Raza individuals that were either in the white, unknown or unspecified categories.

Our Preliminary Report introduced by UnidosUS in May of 2021 (Special Advance Fact Sheet: Deaths of People of Color By Law Enforcement Are Severely Under-Counted), determined that deaths of Brown - Indigenous based peoples at the hands of police are undercounted by approximately 30 percent. 

For our Final Report, the challenge to identify or reassign Raza /“"Latino"”, Asian, Native American or Black was achieved by comparing the US Census Bureau 160 thousand surname list file of race/ethnicity with the surnames of all individuals in La Raza Database. Focusing on the over 9,000 unknown/unspecified individuals from the original database, over 99 percent were reassigned. The vast majority were reclassified as “Latino” or Asian-Pacific Islander. 

Even the adjusted count likely understates the disparity, since significant numbers of Brown people have “European” surnames not captured by the surname match and would not be identified by this analysis. 

Because of the lack of attention to Raza, even though our rates are generally in the same vicinity as the Native and Black communities, we are pushing for Congressional hearings, Legislation, one of which also includes the standardized and centralized gathering of data. One of our recommendations just as equally important is to present the findings to the OAS and the UN’s International Criminal Court. 

It is safe to conclude that aside from the racial, ethnic and cultural background, the communality people of color share from all this violence and dehumanization is a near one hundred percent impunity rate. 

Ya Basta! 

We stand in solidarity with all communities experiencing the effects of violence and in advocating and building a common, anti-racist future, we must forever bear in mind that racism and violence are not completely unavoidable but are animated by the countless actions, expectations, and decisions we take in our everyday lives. 

La Raza Database Research Project Final Report

Final Raza Database Report:

Executive Summary, Analysis, Data Tables, AND Narrative Testimonials and Essays

https://drive.google.com/file/d/14d6bfyBywDRPREqiokCxfa3sHKo3u1Nz/view

GIS Interactive Story Map:

Geography of Deaths Pursued or in Police Custody 2000-2020

https://arcg.is/1bXf810

Music, Poetry, Spoken Word, and Testimonials:

"We Were All Mistaken" Album by Various Artists

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_lja0hiAQEpO1yXRDck9y0XI69ySU8cxpo

Congressional Action Now!

Because of the lack of attention to Latinos, even though our numbers and the rates are generally in the same vicinity as the Native and Black communities, We are pushing for Congressional hearings, and legislation, one of which also includes the gathering of data, what we’ve been doing, which is actually the job of government. UNIDOS-US is already doing work with legislation with the NAACP, Representative Karen Bass (D-CA 37th District), and Representative Jesus “Chuy” Garcia (D-IL 4th District). They had a great town hall most recently about recent reform efforts such as The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, and as was discussed what we can do together to make police reform a reality.

In term of the big picture, the Raza killings database has so far documented over 32,000 police-related killings since 2000, 20% of them African American and 17% Latinos. The results are similar to a recent Washington Post analysis examining police shootings since 2015, which found that Latinos are killed at a rate 55% higher than white non-Hispanics and that Black Americans are killed by police at more than twice the rate of white Americans.

Again, one of the factors at play is that although the numbers of Latinos and African-Americans killed from police actions since 2000 are somewhat similar, Latinos are rarely mentioned when discussing violent police treatment.

In the US, racial conflict has largely played out in black and white. Americans tend to not know the extensive history of Mexicans, Chicanos, and Latinos in the United States and our struggle for civil rights. The national focus on Latino issues is too limited. It often revolves solely around immigration, particularly undocumented immigrants.

Whereas many of the high-profile cases of black Americans killed in police custody reached the national spotlight after sparking outrage among black media and activist groups, there tends to be a general absence in coverage by Latino groups and silencing of our voices.

The movement for black lives is doing something important, elevating all minority lives. And that’s a critical part of the solution. But if our response is narrow and limited, the national response will be narrow and limited as well. That’s problematic as we move toward a country that is increasingly diverse.

We Must Expose Injustice

Latinos are the largest minority group in the US, and they have a right to equal justice in their communities and equal attention to justice. As Latinos, our community already faces disproportionate health and economic impacts, then on top of that we face both a violence pandemic and an educational crisis. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, an economic recession, and a renewed national recognition of systemic racism have only compounded the toll of rampant educational inequity. In terms of exposure to police violence we know it leads to persistent decreases in GPA, increased incidence of emotional disturbance and lower rates of high school completion and college enrollment.

For more information, please contact:

Ivette Xochiyotl Boyzo , Mental Health/Patient, Civil & Human Rights Advocate, at [email protected]

La Raza Killings - LinkTree

Raza Killings Special Advance Fact Sheet  / Spanish Version

  • Phone: +91 8466016171
  • Whatsapp: +91 8208375580
  • Email: contact@leapscholar.com

Unleashing Innovation: Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) at Los Angeles, USA

  • Updated On December 19, 2023
  • Published In General

In the vibrant heart of innovation and academia, the Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) stands as a beacon for aspiring undergraduate students to work on real-world research projects proposed by sponsors from industry or the public sector.This transformative program opens doors to a unique blend of real-world challenges and academic excellence. 

Table of Contents

The Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) program is a summer research opportunity hosted by the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM) at UCLA. Known for its interdisciplinary approach, RIPS brings together bright minds to collaborate on industrial research projects presented by leading companies and organisations.

Who should consider applying to RIPS?

RIPS is designed for students currently enrolled in or recently graduated with an undergraduate (bachelor’s) degree. Graduates who received their degree no earlier than December 2023 are eligible for RIPS 2024. Applicants with a robust background in mathematics and an interest in exploring the real-world applications of mathematics are encouraged to apply. While many projects involve a significant computational aspect, proficiency or at least some experience in computer science, data analysis, or numerical computation is beneficial but not mandatory for all. Competition for the limited slots is intense, and international students can also apply for RIPS-LA.

Key Information

  • Country: USA
  • Internship Location: UCLA campus, Los Angeles,
  • Internship Dates: June 24 – August 23, 2024
  • Financial Benefits: Fully-Funded
  • Deadline: 12th February 2024

Eligibility Criteria

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Unleashing Innovation: Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) at Los Angeles, USA

  • International students are eligible to apply for RIPS-LA, whether or not they study in the US.
  • Undergraduate students are eligible.
  • Recent graduates who have received their degree no earlier than December 2023 may apply for RIPS 2024.
  • Candidates must be at least 18 years of age.
  • Candidates must be undergraduate students or recent graduates.
  • Stipend (USA 4200 or INR 3.5 Lakhs)
  • Travel allowance
  • Housing and meals on campus
  • Site-visit with sponsors (subject to confirmation)
  • Limited partial support for future travel to select conferences

Project Are a

The RIPS program is nine weeks, and you can expect to have nine projects. RIPS projects involve serious maths and computing. Past projects have involved space mission design, crime modelling, machine learning, weather forecasting, digital image blending, quantum computing and finance.

How to Apply?

  • Fill the application form using this link – https://www.mathprograms.org/db/programs/1532
  • All required fields should be properly filled up.
  • The applicants will receive the submission notification after the successful completion of the application form.
  • Official link – https://www.ipam.ucla.edu/programs/student-research-programs/research-in-industrial-projects-for-students-rips-2024-los-angeles/?tab=overview  

Documents Required

  • Transcripts
  • Two reference letters

The Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) program at UCLA is not just a summer research opportunity; it’s a gateway to innovation, collaboration, and a holistic learning experience. By bridging the gap between academia and industry, RIPS equips students with the skills and insights needed to thrive in the ever-evolving landscape of research and development.

For those passionate about applying mathematical concepts to real-world challenges, RIPS at UCLA is an unparalleled opportunity to unleash creativity, solve complex problems, and contribute to groundbreaking solutions. Seize the chance to be part of a community that transcends boundaries and shapes the future of research at the intersection of academia and industry.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. what is it like to participate in rips.

A. RIPS students live, work and socialize together over the summer, so they form close professional and personal relationships. Students have an office with a computer and meeting space at IPAM. IPAM provides technical support and occasional guest lectures. Students stay in university housing within walking distance of IPAM and eat most meals on campus. UCLA is located approximately four miles from the Santa Monica beaches and is within close proximity to many popular tourist destinations. Students work hard, but they can also take surfing lessons, tour Hollywood studios, take weekend trips to national parks, and find other ways to enjoy their summer in LA.

Q. What classes should a student have already completed to be adequately prepared for RIPS?

A. The backgrounds of successful applicants vary quite a bit. Most have taken some upper-division math and some computer programming classes. We will consider the courses you have completed to decide which project is right for you; since students work in teams, if you haven’t covered a subject that is relevant to your project, chances are one of the other students has.

Q. I will graduate with my Bachelors Degree this spring; am I eligible to participate in the RIPS program this summer?

A. Yes, we will accept applicants who will complete their bachelor’s degree between December and June of the current academic year.

Q. How should I tell my references to submit their letters?

A. Reference letters need to be uploaded on the MathPrograms webpage. You will be asked to enter your letter writers’ names and email addresses. The system will send them automatic email requests on your behalf, or you can customise the letter sent to them from the application page. You can also track when a letter is uploaded by one of your references.

Q. Is it necessary to submit transcripts with my application?

A. A transcript or academic record (listing your classes and grades) from your undergraduate institution is required, but it can be unofficial. The file submission happens on the application webpage. The application form will ask you to upload your resume/CV and transcript(s). You may submit your application and return to it later to upload one or both documents.

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Saket Kohli

An International Higher Ed professional with 7+ years of experience studying, working, and living across three geographies, currently on a mission to share his journey as an International Student.

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Congresswoman Julia Letlow Announces Over $37 Million in Community Project Funding For the Fifth District and Hundreds of Millions in Funding for Louisiana

Rep. Letlow Headshot

WASHINGTON, D.C.  - Today, Congresswoman Julia Letlow (LA-05) announced she secured $37.39 million in community project funding that will directly go back to the Fifth District of Louisiana. In addition, hundreds of millions in programmatic funding will benefit the State of Louisiana in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2024 .

Congresswoman Letlow requested and received funding for the Fifth District and State through the following subcommittees: Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies; Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies; Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies; Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies; Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies; and Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies.

“My number one mission in Congress is to give back to our communities,” said Rep. Letlow . “My office and I worked hard to secure the millions in funding that will be crucial for Louisiana’s economic growth and prosperity. Specifically, this funding positively impacts our crawfish industry and USDA programmatic and agricultural research that supports our farmers. It also provides critical funding through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that supports our inland waterway ports, Mississippi River, and operations of Louisiana ports and waterways. It includes full funding for veterans' healthcare programs. In addition, it provides critical funding for law enforcement programs, while holding the FBI and ATF accountable by decreasing their budgets. It also maintains long-standing policies that protect Second Amendment rights in the appropriations process. These substantial investments are crucial for small communities like mine, and I will continue to work through the appropriations process to bring home more funding for our region.”

Community Project Funding for LA-05

  • $9 million for the Alexandria International Airport for runway extension and related airport improvements.
  • $5 million for the Columbia Port Commission for dock improvements and electrification.
  • $4 million for the Citizens Medical Center, located in Columbia, for emergency room expansion.
  • $3.6 million for the State of Louisiana and the City of West Monroe for improvements to the Downing Pines and Mane Street commercial park roundabout.
  • $3.5 million for Louisiana Tech University, located in Ruston, for domestic semiconductor technology research and workforce development.
  • $3 million for the City of Ruston for improvements to the South Farmerville Street Multimodal Corridor.
  • $2.5 million for the Town of Pollock for improvements to their wastewater system.
  • $1.1 million for the North Delta Law Enforcement Planning District for new police cruisers for the Sheriff’s Offices in Caldwell, East Carroll, Franklin, Jackson, Madison, Morehouse, Ouachita, Richland, Tensas, Union, and West Carroll Parishes.
  • $1 million for the University of Louisiana Monroe and the City of Monroe for an entrepreneurial expansion and business incubator building.
  • $1 million for the LSU Ag Center for precision agriculture initiatives and equipment in St. Joseph, Winnsboro, Hammond, Clinton, and Alexandria.
  • $976,000 for the Central Louisiana Regional Port, located in Alexandria, for multimodal loading equipment and improvements to the commodity unloading site.
  • $921,000 for the Washington Parish Government to replace a 911 data communications and telephone services tower.
  • $825,000 for Our Lady of the Angels Hospital, located in Bogalusa, for a helipad to conduct emergency airlifts of patients.
  • $569,000 for the Pointe Coupee Sheriff’s Office, for a new 911 computer-aided dispatch system and record management system for jail records and incident reports.
  • $400,000 for the Town of Tullos for improvements to their wastewater system.

Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies

  • Includes report language regarding improvements for crawfish producers under the Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-raised Fish (ELAP) program.
  • Significant funding for food programs that directly support Louisiana agriculture producers. 
  • Includes report language and an increase of $500,000 for aflatoxin mitigation research at the Agricultural Research Service to support Louisiana corn growers.
  • Includes an increase of $500,000 for sugarcane variety development research at the Agricultural Research Service to support Louisiana sugar farmers.
  • Retains report language regarding Cotton Classing Office Upgrades including the office in Rayville.
  • Includes a $300,000 increase for the Office of Pest Management Policy which will benefit Louisiana soybean growers by providing them with an advocate at USDA to ensure the EPA’s decisions are appropriate, science-based, and keep in mind agriculture needs.
  • Retains report language regarding watershed scale planning at the Natural Resources Conservation Service which will improve water quality within the Mississippi River and Ouachita River Basins to benefit Louisiana rice growers. 
  • Includes $500,000 to investigate West Nile Virus affecting farm-raised alligators.
  • Includes $3 million for Healthy Fluid Milk Incentives to support Louisiana dairy farmers.
  • Includes report language and an increase of $250,000 for daily high-resolution data analysis at the Agricultural Research Service.
  • Retains report language regarding crop insurance policies for quality losses to help address the soybean quality loss disaster from 2022.
  • Continues investments in the Distance Learning and Telemedicine program to support Louisiana's rural communities.
  • $550 million in loan authorizations provided for the rural telecommunications loan program which will assist in providing better broadband connectivity to regions in Louisiana that are still unserved.
  • Report language to evaluate the effectiveness of government-wide broadband programs in bringing internet access to not-yet-served areas. 
  • Includes report language on Cattle Contracts Library to support our Louisiana cattle farmers.
  • Provides level funding for programs supporting youth development at the National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • Includes $4 million for the Veterinary Services Grant Program at the National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • Includes level funding and report language for the Floriculture and Nursery Research Initiative at the Agricultural Research Service.
  • Includes an increase of $500,000 for Agricultural Research Service barley pest research.
  • Includes $35 million for the Equine, Cervid, and Small Ruminant Health

Program, which will address chronic wasting disease in deer.

  • Includes $1.68 billion for multiple agricultural programs that benefit research at the LSU Ag Center and other educational institutions.
  • Loan authority for rural communities' infrastructure improvements through the Department of Agriculture's Rural Water and Waste Disposal Account.

Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

  • $250 million for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), which benefits scientific reach for Louisiana Universities. 
  • $21.7 million for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Autonomous and Uncrewed Technology Operations to provide hurricane forecasting and marine research partnerships with universities.
  • Report language directing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to continue developing the Electronic Logbook program to study and collect data on vessels and the shrimp industry. 
  • $924 million for the Department of Justice Byrne Justice Assistance Grants program, the leading source of federal funding for state and local law enforcement.
  • $256 million for the Department of Justice Community Oriented Policing Services Hiring Program to allow law enforcement agencies to hire officers. 
  • $44 million for the Department of Justice Regional Information Sharing Activities Program to connect local, regional, and federal law enforcement databases for criminal investigations.
  • $25.56 million for the Department of Justice Bureau of Prisons Land Mobile Radio upgrades to provide critical communications updates for federal prisons including USP Pollock and FCI Oakdale. 
  • Report language addressing Bureau of Prison staffing shortages and the use of forced overtime. 
  • $153 million for the Department of Justice DNA Initiative, which includes $120 million for the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program to support public crime laboratories' work processing DNA evidence. 
  • $50 million for the Economic Development Administration Build-to-Scale or Regional Innovation Program grants to provide economic development opportunities for communities. 
  • Bill language maintains all existing pro-life riders and pro-Second Amendment riders.

Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies

  • $30 million for the Delta Regional Authority and $1 million for a pilot program that provides grant writing assistance to communities. 
  • $368 million for the Army Corps of Engineers Mississippi River and Tributaries account.
  • At least $455.97 million for the Army Corps of Engineers Construction funding for inland waterway projects.
  • $10.5 million for the Army Corps of Engineers Operation and Maintenance Engineering with Nature to benefit Louisiana Universities.
  • $52.3 million for the Army Corps of Engineers Operation and Maintenance J. Bennett Johnston Waterway.
  • $1.5 million for the Army Corps of Engineers Operation and Maintenance Lake Providence Harbor and related report language regarding timely dredging of the Port.
  • $258,000 for the Army Corps of Engineers Operation and Maintenance Madison Parish Port project and additional funding for which the project can compete.
  • $2.5 million for the Army Corps of Engineers Lower Mississippi River Comprehensive Study within Mississippi River and Tributaries.
  • Report language for the Army Corps of Engineers Regulatory Program related to interactive community engagement technology for permitting.
  • $4 million for the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy program to support research and development on propane gas.
  • $52.5 million for the Department of Energy's Carbon Utilization program.
  • $910 million for the Department of Energy's small modular reactor design and demonstration activities.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 

  • Report language to include Delta Regional Authority grants as a funding source that can be used to meet the non-Federal matching fund requirement for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Community Project Funding (CPF) grants.
  • $49 million for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s North American Wetlands Conservation Fund to support habitats for waterfowl and preserve Louisiana's sportsmen paradise.
  • $20 million in funding for the National Park Service’s American Battlefield Protection Program to preserve American historical sites.
  • Report language to support the Rigs to Reefs program and direct the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement to continue its policies related to providing extensions to those entities interested in participating in the program and utilizing the program to the maximum extent possible.
  • Funding for the National Endowment for the Humanities to support educational and cultural programming for the State.
  • Report language directing the Environmental Protection Agency to provide a briefing on how the agency is complying with the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit's recent action on the registration of chlorpyrifos, a chemical used in crop production.
  • $30.7 million for the Environmental Protection Agency’s Technical Assistance for Wastewater Treatment Works assistance grants for local communities.

Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

  • $53.6 million for the Federal Ship Financing Program (Title XI) to support the commercial shipbuilding industry in Louisiana.
  • $12 million for the recapitalization of the National Defense Reserve Fleet to ensure the readiness of vessels that support our military.
  • $300 million from the Highway Trust Fund for the Federal Highway Administration Promoting Resilient Operations for Transformative, Efficient, and Cost-Saving Transportation (PROTECT) Program to reinforce existing transportation infrastructure to be more resilient to extreme weather. 
  • $20 million for the Federal Aviation Administration’s workforce development programs to address pilot and aviation maintenance shortages.
  • $8 million for the Department of Transportation’s Position Navigation and Timing and Global Positioning Systems Backup Programs to support technology for defense operations and the financial industry. 
  • $205 million for the Federal Aviation Administration’s Contract Tower Program which provides air traffic control services for airports in Alexandria, Hammond, Houma, Lake Charles, and New Iberia.
  • $345 million for the Department of Transportation’s RAISE grant program which invests in road, rail, transit, and port projects and retains bill language to ensure 50% of awards go to projects in rural areas.

Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies 

  • Fully funds veterans’ health care programs.
  • Provides $2 billion above the President’s Budget Request for military construction, focusing investments on the Pacific theater to deter the Chinese Communist threat, barracks, and other quality-of-life projects.
  • Protects the 2nd Amendment rights of veterans by preventing the VA from sending information to the FBI about veterans without a judge’s consent.

UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation

We’re hiring a project coordinator of heat equity research engagement

Apply by april 1.

' title=

Are you committed to supporting community resilience and heat equity?

We’re hiring a project coordinator of heat equity research engagement, position summary:.

The UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation (LCI) seeks a dedicated and skilled professional to serve as the Project Coordinator of Heat Equity Research Engagement. The Project Coordinator serves as a leader of a new initiative that seeks to bring research, tools, and technical assistance to communities across the United States and beyond in support of their ability to identify, prepare for, mitigate, track, and respond to the negative impacts of extreme heat and to advance cooling solutions. In partnership with state or federal government, other academic research institutions, and nongovernmental organizations, the initiative works directly with communities to provide training and technical assistance to build local capacity for heat mitigation, evaluate policy and planning priorities for protecting residents from heat, and facilitate learning.

Responsibilities will include:

  • Collaborate and communicate with a diverse group of partners across a network of heat policy stakeholders. This will include facilitating effective communication among initiative leadership, external researchers, government agencies, community partners, and other key stakeholders.
  • Develop and implement a system to recruit and respond to communities interested in participating in the initiative.
  • Develop and implement systems to efficiently and proactively provide information, such as research-derived educational materials, to community partners and to track their technical assistance needs, progress, and ultimately their outputs and outcomes.
  • Support grant management, budget tracking, and reporting to funders.
  • Collaborate with colleagues to schedule and coordinate training and feedback sessions for the communities, and to share information with a broader network of interested communities.

Who we’re looking for:

  • You are committed to supporting heat resilience in impacted communities. You have a bachelor’s degree (or masters) in public affairs, public policy, planning, social science, environmental studies, public health, or cognate fields. Ideally, you also have at least two years experience working in public policy, climate adaptation, community resilience, or similar fields and/or have lived experience in communities disproportionately impacted by extreme heat. You are committed to creating resources to empower communities to build heat resilience. You appreciate the importance of research-informed strategies for effective and equitable cooling solutions.
  • You are a collaborator with excellent interpersonal and communication skills. You are a team player who can authentically build relationships and collaborate professionally with a diverse group of community partners, funders, and colleagues. You enjoy growing a network of civic partners that you can learn from and support to advance community priorities. You are a strong writer who communicates complex information in clear and accessible ways.
  • You’re entrepreneurial and a proactive learner. You enjoy taking on new challenges that allow you to pioneer processes while helping to jump start exciting new initiatives. You proactively do your homework and take initiative, first running new ideas by your supervisor and then collaborating with colleagues to create new systems for doing things effectively.
  • You’re highly organized and use technology to make administrative processes run smoothly. Above all, you have a strong attention to detail with excellent organizational and administrative skills. You use technology to make workflows move efficiently, including to ensure the careful tracking and delivering of tasks by deadline. You excel when you juggle multiple responsibilities. Ideally you have experience managing projects, grants, or contracts.

About the Luskin Center for Innovation (LCI):

Our mission is to advance effective and equitable solutions to pressing environmental challenges through actionable research that engages UCLA scholars, policymakers, and communities. We often focus on California, the world’s fourth-largest economy, to support a model of environmental leadership that is relevant globally. Our approach is collaborative. We unite scholars across a wide array of disciplines and engage with hundreds of civic partners who inform and use our research. The Luskin Center for Innovation has influenced dozens of public policies and investments for a more equitable and sustainable future.

It’s an exciting time to join the Luskin Center for Innovation, one of the most impactful research centers in California advancing environmental equity. You’ll be part of a team of faculty, staff, and graduate students working in collaboration with civic partners, including in communities of color, to advance environmental equity during a critical period for evidence-based environmental action.

Details and to apply:

Candidates with a range of lived, professional, and academic experiences are encouraged to apply. We value diversity in all its forms and are committed to inclusive and transparent recruitment, hiring, and promotion processes.

This is a full-time position. Anticipated pay range, depending on experience and qualifications, is approximately $36 to $38 an hour (or the annual equivalent of $77,000 to $80,000). This position is eligible for full and generous University of California benefits. See here for details about UCLA employee perks .

Apply by April 1, 2024. For more details and for the application process, see UCLA’s official job posting .

The UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation acknowledges the Gabrielino/Tongva peoples as the traditional land caretakers of  Tovaangar  (the Los Angeles basin and So. Channel Islands). As a land grant institution, we pay our respects to the  Honuukvetam  (Ancestors),  ‘Ahiihirom  (Elders) and ‘ eyoohiinkem  (our relatives/relations) past, present and emerging. Click on the linked words to hear the pronunciation for the Tongva-language words.

3323 Public Affairs Building, Box 951656, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1656 Phone: 310-267-5435 | Fax: 310-267-5443

A bus ad created for the 2023 HeatSafeLA campaign

IMAGES

  1. Eight keys to choosing and researching an award-winning science fair

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  2. How to structure a research project

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  3. 7th Grade Science Fair Project by Maryam Khan: 2013 LA County Science

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  4. 5 Tips for Successful Research Projects

    research project la

  5. ️ How to develop a research project. How to Get Started With a Research

    research project la

  6. Calaméo

    research project la

VIDEO

  1. What is research

  2. Research Methodology Workshop

  3. Choosing a Research Topic

  4. What is Research??

COMMENTS

  1. Research Projects for 2022-2024 Funding Cycle Announced

    December 06, 2021. Louisiana Sea Grant (LSG) is continuing to fund relevant research projects that address information gaps for coastal Louisiana communities and deal with the state's connection to water — from the Mississippi River to the coastal estuaries. For the 2022-2024 omnibus cycle, LSG will fund three core research projects and ...

  2. Climate Change in the Los Angeles Region

    Focusing on two future periods, 2041-2060 and 2081-2100, they analyzed changes in various aspects of climate—temperature, extreme heat, precipitation, snowfall, and runoff from precipitation in the region's mountains—under two different scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions. The "business as usual" scenario represents a continued ...

  3. Current Research Projects

    Current Research Projects Omnibus Research Projects Since its establishment in 1968, the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program has worked to promote stewardship of the state's coastal resources through a combination of research, education and outreach. Louisiana Sea Grant is an integrated program of extension, education, law and policy, communications, research and management.

  4. Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) 2023

    You must be at least 18 years of age to participate in either program. RIPS-LA runs June 20 - August 18, 2023. Students will live in residence halls on the UCLA campus and will work at IPAM, which will provide technical support and offices. We expect to have nine projects, but the sponsors and projects are not yet finalized.

  5. Research

    Research. Louisiana Tech faculty and students participate in world-renowned research. Faculty and students perform interdisciplinary research that impacts the world on a daily basis. Our students and faculty are working to discover new particles, develop novel drug delivery systems, engineer tissue, monitor the environmental, innovate ...

  6. Ongoing Research Projects

    Louisiana Accelerator Center 320 Cajundome Boulevard Lafayette, LA 70506 (337) 482-6184 | [email protected]

  7. Louisiana Medicaid awards $922,097 to universities for 13 research projects

    Louisiana Medicaid awards $922,097 to universities for 13 research projects 2024 Public University Partnership Program (PUPP) awards . December 27, 2023. ... LA 70802 | PHONE: 225-342-9500 | FAX: 225-342-5568 Medicaid Customer Service 1-888-342-6207 | Healthy Louisiana 1-855-229-6848.

  8. Heat Resilient L.A.

    Heat Resilient L.A. A team of 10 UCLA professors has earned a $956,000 award for a project that will combine their expertise in engineering, urban planning, public health and environmental law to address the rapid increase in the number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles. The prize is funded by a 2015 donation from the Anthony and Jeanne ...

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  10. Los Angeles Renewable Energy Potential: A Preliminary Assessment

    The Sustainable LA Grand Challenge of UCLA has an ambitious goal of helping transition Los Angeles County to 100% renewable energy by 2050 through innovations in science, technology and policy. An important first step is to determine the balance of accessible renewable energy resources and its distribution and storage. To address this data gap, researchers assessed the 2050 renewable energy ...

  11. Current Initiatives

    STEW MAP. In 2016, the LA Urban Center developed a research partnership with Loyola Marymount University's Center for Urban Resilience to support the Los Angeles Stewardship Mapping and Assessment Project (LA STEW-MAP).Led by LMU research scientist Dr. Michele Romolini, LA STEW-MAP is part of a national research program that seeks to answer the questions: Which environmental stewardship ...

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    The research objective of this project is to develop a tandem device capable of providing both energy generation and storage by combining the functions of a photovoltaic and rechargeable battery. Although both systems individually have been studied in-depth and developed, a tandem device that both generates and stores electricity had yet to be ...

  13. Graduate/Research Projects/IRB Requests

    Applications below are for initial review of proposed research projects. Please ensure the appropriate form is used, based on the level of IRB review required for your research, and that the Institutional Approval Form is completed by the research office (s) of the campus (es)where the research will take place.

  14. LA Biomedical Research Institute

    Project Type Medical Research Project Designer John Lockwood Carhart Architect of Record ZGF Architects, Los Angeles The Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA Biomed) is a world-renowned non-profit scientific research organization that is dedicated to saving lives throughout the world. The institute is located on the 10 acre Harbor-UCLA ...

  15. Research Projects

    ME Research Projects. To allow for larger penetration of renewable power such as wind and solar, the strain of their intermittent output on the electrical grid must be alleviated through the use of energy storage. Flow batteries are an ideal battery architecture for large-scale energy storage, and vanadium redox flow batteries are the leading ...

  16. Home

    One Billion Dollars. That's the average amount UCLA has received to fund research projects each year since 2009-10. UCLA research and creative activities have generated some of the most transformative breakthroughs in modern times. From revolutionizing medical diagnostics and treatment to laying the framework to create the Internet or ...

  17. PDF Definition of A Research Project and Specifications for Fulfilling the

    research project is a scientific endeavor to answer a research question. Research projects may include: Case series. Case control study. Cohort study. Randomized, controlled trial. Survey. Secondary data analysis such as decision analysis, cost effectiveness analysis or meta-analysis. Each resident must work under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

  18. How to Write a Research Proposal

    Research questions give your project a clear focus. They should be specific and feasible, but complex enough to merit a detailed answer. 2602. How to Write a Literature Review | Guide, Examples, & Templates A literature review is a survey of scholarly knowledge on a topic. Our guide with examples, video, and templates can help you write yours.

  19. Research Projects Directory

    9,494 active projects. This information was updated 3/1/2024. The Research Projects Directory includes information about all projects that currently exist in the Researcher Workbench to help provide transparency about how the Workbench is being used. Each project specifies whether Registered Tier or Controlled Tier data are used.

  20. Research Project

    Research Project is a planned and systematic investigation into a specific area of interest or problem, with the goal of generating new knowledge, insights, or solutions. It typically involves identifying a research question or hypothesis, designing a study to test it, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions based on the findings.

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  23. Research projects

    Scientific research is the main contributor to solving the major economic, social, and environmental challenges of today's world. La Fondation Dassault Systèmes empowers researchers to stretch the limits of their knowledge by enabling them to work on lifelike digital models of the real world. Discover projects related to our Research field ...

  24. $2-billion downtown L.A. mega-project gets boost ...

    Gov. Gavin Newsom will attempt to expedite construction of a $2-billion residential and commercial mega-development in downtown Los Angeles, his administration announced Thursday. The 7.6-acre ...

  25. Raza Database Project

    La Raza Database Research Project, founded and Directed by the late Roberto "Dr. Cintli" Rodriguez (†), is a volunteer based collaborative project with the Latino Education and Advocacy Days Organization (LEAD) at Cal State San Bernardino to investigate the undercount and inaccuracies reported of the deaths of people of color, with a ...

  26. Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS-LA) 2024

    In the vibrant heart of innovation and academia, the Research in Industrial Projects for Students (RIPS) program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) stands as a beacon for aspiring undergraduate students to work on real-world research projects proposed by sponsors from industry or the public sector.This transformative program opens doors to a unique blend of real-world ...

  27. Congresswoman Julia Letlow Announces Over $37 Million in Community

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Congresswoman Julia Letlow (LA-05) announced she secured $37.39 million in community project funding that will directly go back to the Fifth District of Louisiana. In addition, hundreds of millions in programmatic funding will benefit the State of Louisiana in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2024.

  28. PDF Program Schedule

    UCLA. His research interests are in the study of civil rights, education policy, urban policy, and minority opportunity. He was co-founder and director of the Harvard Civil Rights Project, and since 2006 is co-director of the UCLA Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles. His central interest has been the development

  29. We're hiring a project coordinator of heat equity research engagement

    The UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation (LCI) seeks a dedicated and skilled professional to serve as the Project Coordinator of Heat Equity Research Engagement. The Project Coordinator serves as a leader of a new initiative that seeks to bring research, tools, and technical assistance to communities across the United States and beyond in support of their ability to identify, prepare for ...