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100 Research Topics for High School Students

research topics for junior high school students

By Eric Eng

a student writing on her notebook and looking at the camera

High school is such an exciting time for stretching your intellectual muscles. One awesome way to do that is through research projects. But picking the right topic can make all the difference. It should be something you’re passionate about and also practical to tackle. So, we’ve put together a list of engaging research topics for high school students across ten different subjects: physics, math, chemistry, biology, engineering, literature, psychology, political science, economics, and history. Each topic is crafted to spark your curiosity and help you grow those research skills.

Physics Research Topics

Research topics for high school students in physics are an exciting way to enhance your understanding of the universe.

Physics major student surrounded by physics-related items

1. Gravitational Waves and Space-Time

How do gravitational waves distort space-time, and what can these distortions tell us about the origins of the universe?

2. Quantum Entanglement Applications

What are the potential technological applications of quantum entanglement, and how can it be harnessed for secure communication?

3. Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation

How does dark matter affect the formation and behavior of galaxies, and what evidence supports its existence?

4. Physics of Renewable Energy

What are the fundamental physical principles behind renewable energy sources, and how do they compare in terms of efficiency?

5. Superconductors in Technology

How are superconductors utilized in modern technology, and what advantages do they offer over traditional materials?

6. Particle Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

What significant discoveries have been made at the Large Hadron Collider, and how do they advance our understanding of particle physics?

7. Microgravity Effects on Organisms

How does microgravity affect the physiological and biological functions of organisms during space travel?

8. Thermodynamics and Engine Efficiency

How do the principles of thermodynamics improve the efficiency and performance of internal combustion engines?

9. Electromagnetism in Wireless Communication

How do principles of electromagnetism enable the functioning of wireless communication systems?

10. Cosmic Radiation and Human Space Travel

What are the effects of cosmic radiation on astronauts, and what measures can be taken to protect them during long-term space missions?

These research topics for high school students are designed to deepen your knowledge and prepare you for advanced studies and innovations in the field of physics.

Math Research Topics

Math research topics for high school students are a fantastic way to explore real-world problems through the lens of mathematical principles .

11. Graph Theory and Social Networks

How can graph theory be applied to identify influential nodes and optimize information flow in social networks?

12. Cryptography and Data Security

What cryptographic techniques are most effective in securing online communications and protecting sensitive data?

13. Mathematical Models in Disease Spread

How do SIR models predict the spread of infectious diseases, and what factors affect their accuracy?

14. Game Theory and Economic Decisions

How does game theory explain the strategic behavior of firms in competitive markets?

15. Calculus in Engineering Design

How is calculus used to optimize the structural integrity and efficiency of engineering designs?

16. Linear Algebra in Computer Graphics

How do matrices and vectors facilitate the creation and manipulation of digital images in computer graphics?

17. Statistical Methods in Public Health

What statistical methods are most effective in analyzing public health data to track disease outbreaks?

18. Differential Equations and Population Dynamics

How do differential equations model the population dynamics of endangered species in varying environments?

19. Probability Theory in Risk Management

How is probability theory applied to assess and mitigate financial risks in investment portfolios?

20. Mathematical Modeling in Climate Change Predictions

How do mathematical models simulate climate change scenarios, and what variables are most critical to their predictions?

These research topics for high school students are designed to spark your curiosity and help you build critical thinking skills and practical knowledge.

Chemistry Research Topics

Chemistry research topics for high school students open up a world of molecular wonders and practical applications.

Little Boy Mixes Chemicals in Beakers.

21. Photosynthesis Chemical Processes

How do the chemical reactions involved in photosynthesis convert light energy into chemical energy in plants?

22. Catalysts and Reaction Rates

How do different catalysts influence the rate of chemical reactions, and what factors affect their efficiency?

23. Environmental Pollutants and Atmospheric Chemistry

How do specific environmental pollutants alter chemical reactions in the atmosphere, and what are the consequences for air quality?

24. Green Chemistry Principles

How can green chemistry practices be applied to reduce chemical waste and promote sustainable industrial processes?

25. Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery

How does nanotechnology improve the targeted delivery and effectiveness of drugs within the human body?

26. Plastic Composition and Environmental Impact

How does the chemical composition of various plastics affect their environmental impact and degradation process?

27. Enzymes in Biochemical Reactions

How do enzymes catalyze biochemical reactions, and what factors influence their activity and specificity?

28. Electrochemistry in Battery Technology

How are electrochemical principles applied to improve the performance and sustainability of modern batteries?

29. Chemical Fertilizers and Soil Health

How do chemical fertilizers impact soil health and agricultural productivity, and what alternatives exist to minimize negative effects?

30. Spectroscopy in Compound Identification

How is spectroscopy used to identify and analyze the composition of chemical compounds in various fields?

These research topics for high school students are designed to enhance your understanding of chemical principles and their real-world applications.

Biology Research Topics

Research topics for high school students in biology open up a fascinating window into the complexities of the living world.

31. Genetic Basis of Inherited Diseases

How do specific genetic mutations cause inherited diseases, and what are the mechanisms behind their transmission?

32. Climate Change and Biodiversity

How does climate change affect biodiversity in different ecosystems, and what species are most at risk?

33. Microbiomes and Human Health

How do microbiomes influence human health, and what roles do they play in disease prevention and treatment?

34. Habitat Destruction and Wildlife

How does habitat destruction impact wildlife populations and their behaviors, and what are the long-term ecological consequences?

35. Genetic Engineering in Agriculture

How can genetic engineering techniques improve crop yields and resistance to pests and diseases?

36. Pollution and Aquatic Ecosystems

How do various pollutants affect aquatic ecosystems, and what are the implications for water quality and marine life?

37. Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

How are stem cells used in regenerative medicine to repair and replace damaged tissues and organs?

38. Evolutionary Biology and Species Adaptation

How do evolutionary principles explain the adaptation of species to changing environmental conditions?

39. Diet and Human Health

How do different dietary choices impact human health, and what are the underlying mechanisms?

40. Bioinformatics in Genetic Research

How is bioinformatics used to analyze genetic data, and what insights can it provide into genetic disorders and evolution?

These research topics for high school students are designed to deepen your understanding of life sciences and prepare you for advanced studies and research in the field.

Engineering Research Topics

Engineering research topics give high school students practical insights into designing and creating innovative solutions.

an civil engineering student

41. 3D Printing in Manufacturing

How does 3D printing technology revolutionize manufacturing processes, and what are its key advantages over traditional methods?

42. Robotics in Modern Industry

How do robotics improve efficiency and productivity in modern industries, and what are some specific applications?

43. Sustainable Building Design

What principles of sustainable building design can be applied to reduce environmental impact and enhance energy efficiency?

44. Artificial Intelligence in Engineering

How is artificial intelligence integrated into engineering solutions to optimize processes and solve complex problems?

45. Renewable Energy Technologies

How do renewable energy technologies, such as solar and wind power, contribute to reducing carbon footprints?

46. Aerodynamics in Vehicle Design

How do aerodynamic principles enhance the performance and fuel efficiency of vehicles?

47. Material Science in Engineering Innovations

How do advancements in material science lead to innovative engineering solutions and improved product performance?

48. Civil Engineering in Urban Development

How does civil engineering contribute to urban development and infrastructure planning in growing cities?

49. Electrical Engineering in Modern Electronics

How are electrical engineering principles applied in the design and development of modern electronic devices?

50. Biomedical Engineering and Medical Devices

How does biomedical engineering contribute to the development of innovative medical devices and healthcare solutions?

These research topics for high school students are designed to broaden your understanding of engineering principles and their real-world applications, preparing you for future innovations and problem-solving in the field.

Literature Research Topics

Literature research topics give high school students the chance to delve into the rich and varied world of written works and their broader implications.

51. Identity in Contemporary Young Adult Fiction

How do contemporary young adult fiction novels explore themes of identity and self-discovery among teenagers?

52. Historical Events and Literary Movements

How have significant historical events influenced and shaped various literary movements, such as Romanticism or Modernism?

53. Symbolism in Classic Literature

How do authors use symbolism in classic literature to convey deeper meanings and themes?

54. Narrative Structure in Modern Storytelling

How do modern authors utilize narrative structures to enhance the storytelling experience and engage readers?

55. Literary Devices in Poetry

How do poets employ literary devices like metaphor, simile, and alliteration to enrich the meaning and emotional impact of their work?

56. Dystopian Themes in Science Fiction

How do science fiction authors use dystopian themes to comment on contemporary social and political issues?

57. Cultural Diversity and Literary Expression

How does cultural diversity influence literary expression and contribute to the richness of global literature?

58. Feminist Theory in Literary Analysis

How is feminist theory applied to analyze and interpret the representation of women and gender roles in literature?

59. Postcolonial Literature Principles

How does postcolonial literature address themes of colonization, identity, and resistance, and what are its key characteristics?

60. Intertextuality in Modern Novels

How do modern novelists use intertextuality to create layers of meaning and connect their works with other literary texts?

These research topics for high school students are designed to deepen your understanding of literary techniques and themes. They prepare you for advanced literary analysis and appreciation.

Psychology Research Topics

Psychology research topics offer high school students a fascinating journey into the complexities of human behavior and mental processes.

Unidentified expert talking to a client.

61. Social Media and Adolescent Mental Health

How does social media usage affect the mental health and well-being of adolescents, particularly in terms of anxiety and depression?

62. Stress and Cognitive Function

How does chronic stress impact cognitive functions such as memory, attention, and decision-making?

63. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Anxiety Disorders

How effective is cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating various anxiety disorders, and what mechanisms underlie its success?

64. Early Childhood Experiences and Personality Development

How do early childhood experiences shape personality traits and influence long-term behavioral patterns?

65. Sleep and Memory Retention

How does the quality and quantity of sleep affect the retention and recall of memories?

66. Neuroplasticity in Brain Recovery

How does neuroplasticity facilitate brain recovery and adaptation following injury or neurological illness?

67. Mindfulness Practices and Emotional Regulation

How do mindfulness practices help individuals regulate their emotions and reduce symptoms of stress and anxiety?

68. Genetic Factors in Mental Health Disorders

How do genetic predispositions contribute to the development of mental health disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

69. Group Dynamics and Decision-Making

How do group dynamics influence individual decision-making processes and outcomes in collaborative settings?

70. Psychological Assessments in Educational Settings

How are psychological assessments used to support student learning and development in educational environments?

These research topics for high school students are designed to enhance your understanding of mental processes and behavior. They prepare you for advanced studies and practical applications in the field.

Political Science Research Topics

Political science research topics offer high school students an exciting opportunity to dive into the complexities of political systems and their impact on society.

71. Social Media and Political Campaigns

How does social media influence the strategies and outcomes of political campaigns, particularly in terms of voter engagement and misinformation?

72. International Organizations and Global Governance

How do international organizations, such as the United Nations, contribute to global governance and conflict resolution?

73. Political Corruption and Economic Development

How does political corruption affect economic development and stability in different countries?

74. Democracy in Political Systems

How do the principles of democracy vary across different political systems, and what impact do these differences have on governance?

75. Public Opinion and Policy-Making

How does public opinion shape government policy-making processes and legislative decisions?

76. Political Ideology and Government Policies

How do different political ideologies influence the formulation and implementation of government policies?

77. Electoral Systems and Political Representation

How do various electoral systems impact political representation and voter behavior?

78. Political Communication in Media

How do media and communication strategies shape public perception of political issues and candidates?

79. Globalization and National Sovereignty

How does globalization affect national sovereignty and the ability of states to maintain independent policies?

80. Political Theory and Social Movements

How can political theory be used to understand the origins, development, and impact of social movements?

These research topics for high school students are designed to enhance your understanding of political processes and theories. They prepare you for advanced studies and informed civic participation.

Economics Research Topics

Economics research topics give high school students valuable insights into how economic systems and policies shape our world.

a professor looking at the output of his students

81. Minimum Wage Laws and Employment Rates

How do changes in minimum wage laws impact employment rates across different sectors and demographics?

82. Fiscal Policy in Economic Recessions

How do government fiscal policies, such as stimulus packages, help manage and mitigate the effects of economic recessions?

83. Globalization and Local Economies

How does globalization influence local economies, particularly in terms of job creation and market competition?

84. Behavioral Economics and Consumer Decisions

How do psychological factors and cognitive biases affect consumer decision-making and market trends?

85. Trade Policies and International Relations

How do specific trade policies impact international relations and global trade dynamics?

86. Technology in Economic Growth

How do technological advancements drive economic growth and productivity in various industries?

87. Taxation and Income Distribution

How do different taxation policies affect income distribution and economic inequality within a society?

88. Economic Modeling and Market Predictions

How are economic models used to predict market trends, and what are the limitations of these models?

89. Inflation and Purchasing Power

How does inflation impact purchasing power and the cost of living for consumers?

90. Econometrics in Economic Data Analysis

How is econometrics used to analyze and interpret complex economic data, and what insights can it provide?

These research topics for high school students are designed to deepen your understanding of economic principles and their real-world applications, preparing you for further studies and informed decision-making in the field.

History Research Topics

History research topics for high school students offer a deep dive into the past. They help you understand how it shapes our present and future.

91. Industrial Revolution: Causes and Consequences

What were the key factors that led to the Industrial Revolution, and how did it impact society and the economy?

92. Colonialism and Indigenous Populations

How did colonial rule affect the cultural, social, and economic lives of indigenous populations?

93. Women in Historical Social Movements

What roles did women play in various social movements throughout history, and what were their contributions?

94. Historical Revisionism in Modern Historiography

What are the principles and controversies surrounding historical revisionism in contemporary historiography?

95. Technological Advancements and Historical Events

How have technological innovations influenced significant historical events and driven societal changes?

96. Major Wars: Causes and Effects

What were the primary causes, key events, and consequences of major wars in history?

97. Religion in Shaping Historical Narratives

How has religion influenced the crafting and interpretation of historical narratives across different cultures?

98. Historiography and Documenting Events

What methods and principles are used in historiography to accurately record and analyze historical events?

99. Economic Changes and Historical Societies

How have economic shifts impacted social structures and historical developments in various societies?

100. Primary Sources in Historical Research

Why are primary sources important in historical research, and how are they used to ensure accuracy and depth in historical analysis?

These research topics for high school students are designed to deepen your understanding of past events and their significance, preparing you for advanced studies and critical historical inquiry.

Young woman smiling at the camera while in front of the computer.

How do I pick the right high school research topic?

Choosing the right research topic involves considering your interests, the availability of resources, and the relevance of the topic to current issues. Start by identifying subjects you are passionate about. Then, look for specific questions within those subjects that spark your curiosity. It’s also important to consider the feasibility of the research, including access to necessary materials and data.

What high school research topics are in demand today?

High-demand research topics for high school students today often align with current global challenges and advancements. In science and technology, areas such as renewable energy, artificial intelligence , and genetic engineering are popular. In social sciences, topics like the impact of social media, political polarization, and mental health are highly relevant. Keeping up with current events and scientific journals can help you identify trending topics.

What resources should I use for my high school research?

Effective research requires a mix of resources. Start with your school library and online databases like JSTOR or Google Scholar for academic papers. Utilize books, reputable websites, and expert interviews to gather diverse perspectives. Don’t overlook primary sources, such as historical documents or scientific data, which provide firsthand information. Additionally, consider using software tools for data analysis and project management.

How can I publish or present my high school research?

Publishing and presenting your research can enhance its impact and your academic profile. Consider submitting your work to high school research journals , science fairs , and local or national competitions. You can also present at school or community events, or create a blog or website to share your findings. Networking with teachers and professors can provide guidance and additional opportunities for publication and presentation.

How does high school research enhance my college applications?

High school research demonstrates your ability to undertake independent projects, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Colleges value these attributes as they indicate readiness for college-level work. Including research experience in your application can set you apart from other applicants. It shows your commitment to learning and your ability to contribute to academic and extracurricular activities at the college level.

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Research Paper Topics for High School Students

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Table of contents

  • 1.1 Consider the Scope and Time Commitment
  • 1.2 Align the Topic with Your Interests
  • 1.3 Use Resources and Guides
  • 2.1 Education Research Topics
  • 2.2 Research Topics about World History
  • 2.3 Healthcare Research Topics
  • 2.4 Finance Research Topics
  • 2.5 Mental Health Topics
  • 2.6 Science Research Topics
  • 2.7 Music research topics
  • 2.8 Environmental
  • 2.9 Entrepreneurship
  • 3 Conclusion

Research papers are common assignments in high school systems worldwide. They serve as a method for students to convey what they have learned from in-depth analysis on a specific subject. But why are they so prevalent in high schools?

The reason is that writing a well-structured and organized research paper teaches students essential academic skills such as making critical connections, expressing understanding, summarizing complex data, and effectively communicating their findings.

The process begins with selecting from various potential research paper topics. Students must identify a topic that not only interests them but also has sufficient scope to explore in depth. Selecting a good research paper topic is key to connecting with your audience — usually, your teachers and classmates. However, choosing the best topic can be tough. This is often because there are so many options available or it’s unclear what makes a topic both doable and interesting.

To help students with this important first step in the research paper process, we’ve created this guide. It provides strategies for picking the right topics and features a diverse list of more than 50 research ideas. These suggestions aim to improve academic performance by covering a variety of subjects, giving students a strong start for their research projects.

How to Choose High School Research Paper Topics

Choosing the right research paper topic is key, especially with so many suitable options for high school. The process might seem overwhelming, but learning how to narrow down your options can make it easier to handle.

Consider the Scope and Time Commitment

The first thing to consider is the amount of time you have to complete your paper. Topics that are too broad can be exhausting and may make it difficult to finish the paper on time. It’s best to choose topics that are not too broad yet detailed enough to explore within your deadline. Well-defined topics help you stay focused and organized, making your research and writing processes more efficient.

Align the Topic with Your Interests

Motivation plays a key role in the success of your research. Select a research paper topic that aligns with your personal interests and that you find interesting. This will keep you engaged and energized throughout the writing process.

If you’re struggling or the deadline is near and your paper isn’t ready, remember there are resources to help, like buying a research paper to meet your academic needs. But ideally, with the right topic and careful planning, you should be able to finish your assignment on your own.

Use Resources and Guides

To aid in your topic selection, refer to guides and lists that offer a variety of research ideas. These resources aim to inspire and give you a good start for your research paper. They cover a wide range of topics and are designed to meet various academic needs. By picking a topic from these lists, you can boost your performance and kickstart your research project smoothly, leading to a good research paper.

Most Interesting & Easy Research Topics for High School students

We’ve sorted the all research paper ideas into categories to make your academic exploration easier. Your personal interest is crucial when choosing a topic, so we suggest exploring the category that interests you the most. If you’re short on time, remember that here at PapersOWL, we are ready to provide a custom research paper tailored to your needs.

Education Research Topics

If you are interested in education, you should consider choosing an education research topic for high school students. Below you can find ten topics you can use as inspiration.

  • Should High Schools Impose Mandatory Vaccination on Students?
  • The Benefits of Charter Schools for the Public Education System
  • Homeschooling vs. Traditional Schooling: Which One Better Sets Students for Success?
  • Should Public Education Continue to Promote Diversity? Why?
  • The Most Beneficial Funding Programs for Students
  • The Effects of the Rising Price of College Tuitions on High School Students
  • Discuss the Most Noteworthy Advantages and Disadvantages of Standardized Testing
  • What Are the Alternatives to Standardized Testing?
  • Does a Gap Year Between High School and College Set Students for Success?
  • Identify and Discuss the Major Benefits of Group Projects for High Schoolers
  • The Role of Technology in Modern Education
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on Educational Systems Worldwide
  • Addressing the Achievement Gap in Education
  • The Impact of AI on Personalized Learning
  • Online Learning: Pros and Cons in Modern Education
  • The Role of E-Learning Platforms in Modern Education
  • Strategies to Integrate AI into Classroom
  • The Ethical Implications of Using AI in Student Surveillance

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Research Topics about World History

  • The Origin Of The Israel-Palestine Conflict And Possible Resolutions
  • The History Of The USA Occupation Of Iraq
  • Choose A Famous Assassinated World Leader And Discuss What Led To The Assassination
  • Discuss A Historical Invention And How It Changed The Lives Of People Worldwide
  • Has The World’s Leading Countries’ Response To Climate Change Improved Or Declined Over The Last Decade?
  • How The President Of Belarus Manages To Stay In Power For Over 25 Years
  • Which Event In World History Had The Most Impact On Your Country?
  • The Influence of Ancient Civilizations on Modern Society
  • The Role of the Silk Road in Connecting Cultures
  • The Impact of the Industrial Revolution on World History
  • Colonialism and Its Long-Term Effects on Colonized Nations
  • The Cold War: Causes, Major Events, and Lasting Impacts
  • The Role of Women in Shaping World History
  • The Role of Women in World War I and II
  • Decolonization Movements Post-World War II
  • The Effect of Technological Advancements on Warfare Throughout History
  • Three Kingdoms Period in Chinese History
  • Albigensian Crusade and Its Impact on Medieval Europe
  • Italian Front in World War I
  • History and Influence of the Mongolian Empire
  • Greco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Kingdoms
  • Great Game: Anglo-Russian Rivalry in Central Asia
  • Cultural and Historical Significance of the Abbasid Caliphate

Healthcare Research Topics

  • The Benefits and Risks of Telemedicine
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on Global Healthcare Systems
  • Mental Health Awareness in High Schools
  • The Role of Vaccination in Public Health
  • Obesity and Its Impact on Health in Adolescents
  • The Future of Personalized Medicine
  • The Ethics of Genetic Engineering in Healthcare
  • How AI is Revolutionizing Healthcare Diagnostics
  • Access to Healthcare in Rural vs. Urban Areas
  • The Importance of Preventive Healthcare
  • Healthcare Disparities Among Different Socioeconomic Groups
  • The Effects of Climate Change on Public Health
  • The Role of Technology in Managing Chronic Diseases
  • Nutrition and Its Impact on Adolescent Health
  • The Influence of Pharmaceutical Companies on Healthcare Policies
  • The Pros and Cons of Universal Healthcare Systems
  • Addressing the Opioid Crisis: Causes and Solutions
  • The Role of Mental Health Services in Schools
  • The Impact of Social Media on Teen Health Behaviors
  • The Advancements in Cancer Treatments

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Finance Research Topics

  • How Cryptocurrency is Changing the Financial Landscape
  • Impact of Globalization on Financial Markets
  • Ethical Investing: Benefits and Challenges
  • Microfinance and Its Role in Economies Development
  • Influence of Interest Rates on Economic Growth
  • The Financial Implications of Student Loan Debt
  • Sustainable Finance and Its Growing Importance
  • The Role of Central Banks in Stabilizing Economies
  • How AI is Transforming Financial Services
  • Online Banking: Security and Convenience
  • The Effects of Economic Recessions on Small Businesses
  • The Evolution of Stock Markets Over the Last Century
  • The Financial Impact of Natural Disasters
  • Personal Finance Education: Should It Be Mandatory in Schools?
  • The Future of Digital Payments
  • Challenges of Implementing Universal Basic Income
  • Impact of Tax Policies on Economic Inequality
  • Role of Hedge Funds in Financial Markets
  • The Rise of Robo-Advisors in Personal Finance Management

Mental Health Topics

Here are some relevant and significant mental health research topics for high school research papers. These topics are here to inspire and guide you in your research:

  • Discuss The Main Ways Stress Affects The Body
  • Can Daily Exercises Benefit Mental Health? How?
  • Should More Counselors Work In High Schools? Why?
  • Discuss The Major Factors That Contribute To Poor Mental And Physical Well-Being
  • In What Ways Has The Worldwide Pandemic Affected People’s Mental Health?
  • Explore The Relationship Between Social Media And Mental Health Disorders
  • How The Public School System Cares For The Mental Health Of Students
  • What Is The Most Effective Psychotherapy For High Schoolers?
  • Impact of Bullying on Mental Health
  • Role of Nutrition in Mental Health
  • Cultural Differences in Mental Health Perceptions and Treatment
  • Mindfulness Practices Effectiveness in Schools
  • Family Dynamics Influence on Adolescent Mental Health

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Science Research Topics

Science is one of those fields where there is always something new you can research. If you need a science research topic for high school students, feel free to use any of the following.

  • How Can Civilization Save Coral Reefs?
  • What Are Black Holes, And What Is Their Role?
  • Explain Sugar Chemistry That Enables Us To Make Candies
  • What Are The Biggest Successes Of The Epa In The Last Decade?
  • Is There A Way To Reverse Climate Change? How?
  • What Solutions Does Science Offer To Resolve The Drinking Water Crisis In The Future?
  • Ways to Save Coral Reefs
  • Black Holes and Their Role
  • Sugar Chemistry in Candy Making
  • Biggest Successes of the EPA in the Last Decade
  • Reversing Climate Change
  • Scientific Solutions for the Drinking Water Crisis
  • The Role of CRISPR in Genetic Engineering
  • Impacts of Space Exploration on Earth Science
  • Developments in Renewable Energy Technologies
  • The Effects of Microplastics on Marine Life
  • Nanotechnology in Medicine
  • Quantum Computing and Its Potential Uses
  • Studying the Human Genome Project
  • Advancements in Vaccine Development

Music research topics

Many teenagers find inspiration in music, so why not choose some music high school research paper topics.

  • In What Way Music Education Benefits High School Students?
  • How Famous Musicians Impact Pop Music
  • Classification Of Music Instruments: Discuss The Sachs-Hornbostel System
  • Did Sound Effect Technology Change The Music Industry? How?
  • How Did Online Streaming Platforms Help Music Evolve?
  • How Does Music Software Emulate Sounds Of Different Instruments?

Environmental

Our environment has been a hot topic for quite some time now. There is a lot of research to back up your claims and make logical assumptions. Here are some environmental high school research topics you can choose from.

  • What Is The Impact Of Offshore Drilling On The Environment?
  • Do We Need Climate Change Legislation? Why?
  • Are Ecotourism And Tropical Fishing Viable Ways To Save And Recuperate Endangered Areas And Animals?
  • The Impact Of Disposable Products On The Environment
  • Discuss The Benefits Of Green Buildings To Our Environment
  • Find And Discuss A Large-Scale Recent Project That Helped Restore Balance In An Area

Entrepreneurship

Many students struggle with having to find good entrepreneurship research paper ideas for high school. This is why we’ve developed a list of topics to inspire your research.

  • What Is Entrepreneurship?
  • Are People Born With An Entrepreneurial Spirit, Or Can You Learn It?
  • Discuss The Major Entrepreneurship Theories
  • Does Entrepreneurship Affect The Growth Of The Economy?
  • Which Character Traits Are Commonly Found In Successful Entrepreneurs?
  • The Pros And Cons Of Having A Traditional Job And Being An Entrepreneur
  • Discuss Entrepreneurship As One Of The Solutions To Unemployment
  • What Is Crowdfunding, And How It’s Related To Entrepreneurship
  • The Most Common Challenges Entrepreneurs Face
  • How Social Media Made A Lot Of Successful Entrepreneurs

Hopefully, you’ll find these high school research paper topics inspirational. The categories are there to help you choose easily. Here at PapersOwl, we know how hard it is to complete all assignments in time and ace all your grades. If you are struggling with writing, feel free to contact us about our writing services, and we’ll help you come on top of your research paper assignment no matter how complex it is.

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List of Research Topics in Entrepreneurship: Exploring the Frontiers of Entrepreneurship

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Research Paper

129 Most Insightful Research Topics For High School

Discover engaging research topics for high school. Spark curiosity with diverse subjects. Find the perfect topic for your academic exploration!

Feb 13, 2024

students adding topic on wall - Research Topics For High School

High school can be an exciting time for students, as they embark on a journey of self-discovery and academic exploration. One aspect of this journey is the infamous research paper. While it may seem daunting at first, choosing the right research topic can make all the difference.  In this blog, we will delve into the realm of Research Topics For High School, providing you with a curated list of engaging and thought-provoking subjects that will surely captivate your interest. From the wonders of astrophysics to the mysteries of ancient civilizations, we will explore a wide range of topics that will not only impress your teachers but also fuel your curiosity. So, let's dive into the world of research and uncover the secrets of Research Paper Structure together!

Table of Contents

What makes a great research topic, otio: the ultimate ai research and writing partner for efficient workflows, benefits of engaging in research projects during high school, challenges you may encounter during the research process & how to overcome them, how to effectively manage your time while conducting research, supercharge your researching ability with otio — try otio for free today.

man writing down new Research Topics For High School

A great research essay topic possesses certain characteristics that make it engaging, relevant, and impactful. Here are the key characteristics that make a research essay topic great:

1. Relevance

A great research essay topic is one that is relevant to the subject or field of study. It should address a current issue or explore a significant concept or idea within the chosen discipline.

2. Originality

A great research essay topic should be original and unique. It should offer a fresh perspective or approach to the subject matter, avoiding overused or clichéd themes .

3. Depth and Complexity

A great research essay topic delves into the complexity of a subject, allowing for an in-depth analysis and exploration. It should provide ample opportunities for critical thinking and analysis.

4. Feasibility

A great research essay topic is one that is feasible to research and write about within the given time and resource constraints. It should have accessible sources and available data for investigation.

5. Controversy or Debate

A great research essay topic sparks controversy or debate within the field of study. It addresses a topic that has multiple viewpoints or conflicting perspectives, allowing for a comprehensive analysis of different arguments.

6. Interest and Engagement

A great research essay topic captivates the interest of the reader and the researcher. It should evoke curiosity and enthusiasm, motivating the researcher to explore the topic in depth and engage the reader throughout the essay. By incorporating these characteristics into the selection of a research essay topic, students can ensure that their writing is impactful, meaningful, and contributes to the body of knowledge in their chosen field of study.

Otio: Revolutionizing Research Workflows with AI-Native Workspace and Content Management

Knowledge workers, researchers, and students today suffer from content overload and are left to deal with it using fragmented, complex, and manual tooling. Too many of them settle for stitching together complicated bookmarking, read-it-later, and note-taking apps to get through their workflows.  Now that anyone can create content with the click of a button - this problem is only going to get worse. Otio solves this problem by providing one AI-native workspace for researchers. It helps them: 

A wide range of data sources, from bookmarks, tweets, and extensive books to YouTube videos. 

2. Extract key takeaways

With detailed AI-generated notes and source-grounded Q&A chat. 

Draft outputs using the sources you’ve collected. Otio helps you go from a reading list to a first draft faster. Along with this, Otio also helps you write research papers/essays faster.  Here are our top features that are loved by researchers: AI-generated notes on all bookmarks (YouTube videos, PDFs, articles, etc.), Otio enables you to chat with individual links or entire knowledge bases, just like you chat with ChatGPT, as well as AI-assisted writing.  Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner — try Otio for free today!

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• Research Paper Thesis Examples • Best Research Paper Topics • How To Write A Research Paper Outline • History Research Paper Topics • Examples Of Research Topics • Us History Research Paper Topics • How To Write A Research Report • Topics For History Research Paper • How To Choose A Research Topic • Controversial Research Paper Topics • How To Write A Research Paper Fast • English Research Paper Topics • Tips For Writing A Research Paper • Best Topics For Research Paper • Scientific Research Paper Topics • Research Paper Ideas For English • What To Include In Introduction Of Research Paper • Research Paper Draft

students arranging topics - Research Topics For High School

1. The Impact of Social Media on Teenagers' Mental Health

2. The Role of Artificial Intelligence in Modern Healthcare

3. The Effects of Climate Change on Global Food Security

4. The History and Significance of the Civil Rights Movement

5. The Pros and Cons of Genetic Engineering in Agriculture

6. The Influence of Music on Mood and Emotions

7. The Origins of the Universe: The Big Bang Theory vs. Creationism

8. The Impact of Video Games on Adolescent Behavior and Cognition

9. The Role of Women in World War II

10. The Effects of Air Pollution on Human Health

11. The Benefits and Risks of Vaccinations: Debunking Myths

12. The History and Impact of the Industrial Revolution

13. The Role of Social Media in Political Movements and Activism

14. The Psychology of Dreams: Interpretation and Meaning

15. The Impact of Cyberbullying on Adolescent Well-being

16. The History and Cultural Significance of Hip Hop Music

17. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on the Job Market

18. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Substance Abuse

19. The Role of Education in Combating Poverty

20. The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Academic Performance

21. The Influence of Advertising on Consumer Behavior

22. The Impact of Globalization on Cultural Identity

23. The History and Significance of the Women's Suffrage Movement

24. The Role of Technology in Education: Enhancing Learning Experiences

25. The Effects of Fast Food Consumption on Obesity Rates

26. The Importance of Mental Health Education in Schools

27. The Role of Mass Media in Shaping Public Opinion

28. The Impact of Climate Change on Wildlife and Ecosystems

29. The History and Evolution of the English Language

30. The Benefits and Risks of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

31. The Influence of Advertising on Body Image and Self-Esteem

32. The Role of Youth Activism in Social Change

33. The Effects of Screen Time on Child Development

34. The History and Legacy of the Civil War

35. The Impact of Renewable Energy Sources on the Environment

36. The Psychology of Addiction: Understanding Substance Abuse

37. The Role of Art in Society: Expressing Identity and Emotions

38. The Effects of Parental Divorce on Children's Well-being

39. The History and Impact of the Women's Rights Movement

40. The Benefits and Limitations of Online Learning

41. The Influence of Pop Culture on Teenagers' Values and Behaviors

42. The Impact of Social Media on Political Participation

43. The Causes and Consequences of Bullying in Schools

44. The Role of Media in Shaping Beauty Standards

45. The Effects of Exercise on Mental Health and Well-being

46. The History and Significance of the Harlem Renaissance

47. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Privacy and Security

48. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Pregnancy

49. The Role of Literature in Promoting Empathy and Understanding

50. The Impact of Immigration on Cultural Diversity and Social Cohesion

51. The Effects of Air Pollution on Climate Change

52. The Importance of Financial Literacy Education for High School Students

53. The Role of Religion in Politics and Governance

54. The History and Influence of Ancient Greek Philosophy

55. The Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Energy

56. The Influence of Media Violence on Aggressive Behavior

57. The Impact of Poverty on Child Development and Academic Achievement

58. The Role of Gender Stereotypes in Career Choices

59. The Effects of Technology on Human Interaction and Relationships

60. The History and Impact of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

61. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Ethical Decision Making

62. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Depression

63. The Role of Music Education in Cognitive Development

64. The Effects of Social Media on Body Image and Eating Disorders

65. The History and Cultural Significance of Classical Music

66. The Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Weapons

67. The Influence of Television on Children's Behavior and Attitudes

68. The Impact of Poverty on Mental Health and Well-being

69. The Role of Gender Equality in Achieving Sustainable Development

70. The Effects of Technology on Sleep Patterns and Quality

71. The History and Influence of Ancient Egyptian Civilization

72. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Human Rights

73. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Suicide

74. The Role of Sports in Promoting Physical and Mental Health

75. The Effects of Social Media on Academic Performance

76. The History and Cultural Significance of Jazz Music

77. The Benefits and Risks of Nuclear Power Plants

78. The Influence of Advertising on Children's Behavior and Values

79. The Impact of Poverty on Access to Education

80. The Role of Gender Stereotypes in Relationship Dynamics

81. The Effects of Technology on Attention Span and Concentration

82. The History and Influence of Ancient Roman Civilization

83. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Human Morality

84. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Substance Addiction

85. The Role of Exercise in Preventing Chronic Diseases

86. The Effects of Social Media on Interpersonal Relationships

87. The History and Cultural Significance of Rock and Roll Music

88. The Benefits and Risks of Solar Energy

89. The Influence of Media on Adolescent Body Image Dissatisfaction

90. The Impact of Poverty on Crime Rates

91. The Role of Environmental Education in Promoting Sustainability

92. The Effects of Technology on Academic Integrity

93. The History and Influence of Ancient Chinese Civilization

94. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Employment Opportunities

95. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Anxiety Disorders

96. The Role of Nutrition in Cognitive Functioning

97. The Effects of Social Media on Teenagers' Self-esteem

98. The History and Cultural Significance of Romantic Literature

99. The Benefits and Risks of Wind Energy

100. The Influence of Media on Teenagers' Body Image Perception

101. The Impact of Poverty on Mental Health Stigma

102. The Role of Youth Entrepreneurship in Economic Development

103. The Effects of Technology on Physical Fitness Levels

104. The History and Influence of Ancient Mayan Civilization

105. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Social Equality

106. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Eating Disorders

107. The Role of Sleep in Learning and Memory Consolidation

108. The Effects of Social Media on Cyberbullying

109. The History and Cultural Significance of Renaissance Art

110. The Benefits and Risks of Hydroelectric Power

111. The Influence of Media on Teenagers' Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors

112. The Impact of Poverty on Access to Healthcare

113. The Role of Youth Volunteerism in Community Development

114. The Effects of Technology on Mental Health and Well-being

115. The History and Influence of Ancient Aztec Civilization

116. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Criminal Justice

117. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Internet Addiction

118. The Role of Mindfulness in Stress Reduction

119. The Effects of Social Media on Teenagers' Academic Motivation

120. The History and Cultural Significance of Impressionist Art

121. The Benefits and Risks of Geothermal Energy

122. The Influence of Media on Teenagers' Substance Use Behaviors

123. The Impact of Poverty on Children's Educational Attainment

124. The Role of Youth Leadership in Social Change

125. The Effects of Technology on Youth Loneliness and Isolation

126. The History and Influence of Ancient Mesopotamian Civilization

127. The Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Privacy Rights

128. The Causes and Consequences of Teenage Gambling Addiction

129. The Role of Mind-Body Practices in Promoting Well-being.

woman on keyboard working with otio - Research Topics For High School

AI research and writing partner: Knowledge workers, researchers and students today suffer from content overload and are left to deal with it using fragmented, complex and manual tooling. Too many of them settle for stitching together complicated bookmarking, read-it-later and note-taking apps to get through their workflows.  Now that anyone can create content with the click of a button - this problem is only going to get worse. Otio solves this problem by providing one AI-native workspace for researchers. It helps them: 

with detailed AI-generated notes and source-grounded Q&A chat. 

Draft outputs using the sources you’ve collected. Otio helps you to go from reading list to first draft faster. Along with this, Otio also helps you write research papers/essays faster. Here are our top features that are loved by researchers: AI-generated notes on all bookmarks (Youtube videos, PDFs, articles, etc.), Otio enables you to chat with individual links or entire knowledge bases, just like you chat with ChatGPT, as well as AI assisted writing.  Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner — try Otio for free today!

high school students in class - Research Topics For High School

Engaging in research projects during high school can have numerous benefits for future academic and professional development. Research allows students to develop critical thinking skills , enhance their understanding of various subjects, and gain valuable experience in conducting in-depth investigations. We will discuss the specific benefits of engaging in research projects during high school and how they contribute to students' future success.

1. Development of Critical Thinking Skills

Research projects require students to analyze information, evaluate evidence, and draw conclusions based on their findings. This process enhances critical thinking skills, enabling students to become more discerning and analytical in their approach to problem-solving. By learning to ask meaningful questions and think critically, students develop a valuable skill set that can be applied to any academic or professional field.

2. Enhanced Understanding of Subject Matter

Engaging in research projects allows high school students to delve deeper into a particular subject and gain a comprehensive understanding of it. By conducting extensive research, students can explore different perspectives, theories, and methodologies related to their chosen topic. This deep understanding provides a solid foundation for future academic pursuits and helps students develop a broader knowledge base.

3. Acquisition of Research Skills

Research projects provide an opportunity for high school students to acquire essential research skills. These skills include conducting literature reviews, formulating research questions, designing methodologies, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting findings. By engaging in research projects, students become familiar with research processes, methodologies, and ethical considerations, which are valuable skills for future academic and professional endeavors.

4. Exposure to the Scientific Method

Research projects often follow the scientific method, which involves formulating hypotheses, designing experiments, collecting data, and drawing conclusions. By engaging in research projects during high school, students become familiar with this structured approach to problem-solving. This exposure to the scientific method cultivates a systematic and evidence-based approach to decision-making, which is applicable to various academic and professional settings.

5. Development of Presentation and Communication Skills

Engaging in research projects often entails presenting findings to peers, teachers, or at academic conferences. This experience provides high school students with an opportunity to develop their presentation and communication skills. By effectively conveying their research findings, students learn to articulate complex ideas, organize information, and engage with their audience. These skills are valuable for future academic presentations, job interviews, and professional collaborations.

6. Exploration of Personal Interests and Passions

Research projects allow high school students to explore their personal interests and passions in depth. By choosing a research topic that aligns with their interests, students can further develop their knowledge and expertise in a specific area. This exploration not only enriches their academic experience but also helps them discover potential career paths and pursue further studies in a field they are passionate about.

7. Preparation for Higher Education

Engaging in research projects during high school provides valuable preparation for higher education. Research experience enhances college applications and demonstrates a student's commitment to academic excellence. The skills acquired through research projects, such as critical thinking, research methodologies, and effective communication, are highly sought after in college and can contribute to success in higher education. Engaging in research projects during high school offers numerous benefits for future academic and professional development. From the development of critical thinking skills to the acquisition of research methodologies and presentation skills, research projects provide a valuable learning experience. By engaging in research, high school students gain a deeper understanding of subjects, explore personal interests, and prepare themselves for future academic pursuits.

student helping friend to find Research Topics For High School

1. Finding a Suitable Research Topic

Choosing a research topic can be a daunting task for high school students. They may struggle to find a topic that aligns with their interests, is relevant to their academic goals, and has enough available resources for in-depth research.  To overcome this obstacle, students can start by brainstorming their interests, exploring current events, and consulting with their teachers or mentors for guidance. They can also use online resources like topic generators or databases to discover potential research ideas.

2. Limited Access to Resources

High school students often face limitations in accessing reliable and comprehensive resources for their research. School libraries may have limited collections, and online access to scholarly articles and databases may require subscriptions or fees.  To overcome this challenge, students can utilize their school libraries, request interlibrary loans for specific resources, or explore open-access databases and websites. They can also reach out to local universities or community organizations that may offer resources for student research.

3. Developing Effective Research Skills

Many high school students lack the necessary research skills to conduct thorough and efficient investigations. They may struggle with evaluating sources for credibility , organizing information, and synthesizing findings.  To address this obstacle, students can participate in research workshops, seek guidance from their teachers or librarians, and practice using research tools and databases. They can also learn about citation formats and ethical considerations to ensure their research is academically honest.

4. Time Management and Procrastination

Time management is a common challenge for high school students, and it can significantly impact the research process. Students may procrastinate, leaving them with limited time to gather information, analyze data, and write their findings.  To overcome this obstacle, students should create a research plan with specific deadlines for each phase of the project. Breaking the research process into manageable tasks and utilizing time management techniques, such as the Pomodoro Technique, can help students stay organized and focused.

5. Dealing with Information Overload

In the digital age, high school students can easily become overwhelmed by the sheer volume of information available for research. They may struggle to filter relevant content, leading to information overload and confusion. To tackle this challenge, students can develop effective search strategies using keywords and advanced search operators. They should also learn to critically evaluate sources, prioritize information based on relevance and reliability, and take concise notes to avoid information overload.

6. Writing and Citations

Writing a research paper or essay can be intimidating, especially for high school students who may have limited experience in academic writing. They may struggle with structuring their work, incorporating citations, and maintaining a coherent argument.  To overcome this obstacle, students can utilize writing resources and guides provided by their schools or online platforms. They should also practice paraphrasing and citing sources correctly, ensuring that they adhere to the required citation style (e.g., MLA or APA). High school students may encounter various challenges and obstacles during their research process, ranging from topic selection to time management and information overload. By utilizing available resources, seeking guidance, and developing essential research skills, students can overcome these challenges and enhance the quality of their research projects.

Otio: Revolutionizing Research and Writing with AI-Powered Workspaces

AI research and writing partner: Knowledge workers, researchers, and students today suffer from content overload and are left to deal with it using fragmented, complex, and manual tooling. Too many of them settle for stitching together complicated bookmarking, read-it-later, and note-taking apps to get through their workflows.  Now that anyone can create content with the click of a button - this problem is only going to get worse. Otio solves this problem by providing one AI-native workspace for researchers. It helps them: 

Draft outputs using the sources you’ve collected. Otio helps you to go from reading list to first draft faster. Along with this, Otio also helps you write research papers/essays faster.  Here are our top features that are loved by researchers: AI-generated notes on all bookmarks (YouTube videos, PDFs, articles, etc.), Otio enables you to chat with individual links or entire knowledge bases, just like you chat with ChatGPT, as well as AI-assisted writing.  Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner — try Otio for free today!

man holding clock for managing time while researching Research Topics For High School

Effective time management is crucial for high school students conducting research. With the demands of classes, extracurricular activities, and social lives, it can be challenging to find the time and focus needed for thorough research. By implementing strategies and tools, students can optimize their time and ensure successful research outcomes.

1. Set Clear Goals and Prioritize Tasks

By setting clear research goals and breaking them down into smaller tasks, high school students can stay organized and focused. Start by outlining the research objectives, identifying the main research questions, and creating a timeline. Prioritize tasks based on deadlines and the importance of each component.

2. Create a Schedule

A well-structured schedule is essential for effective time management. Allocate specific time slots for research, ensuring that it is a regular and consistent part of your routine. Consider your personal energy levels and concentration peaks when scheduling your research sessions. Maintaining a balance between research and other responsibilities will help prevent burnout and promote overall well-being.

3. Utilize Technology and Research Tools

Technology can be a powerful ally when it comes to managing time effectively. There are numerous digital tools available that can streamline the research process. For example, using an AI research and writing partner like Otio can help students collect and organize information from various sources, generate AI-generated notes, and facilitate efficient writing. Otio's features, such as chat-based Q&A and AI-assisted writing, can significantly enhance the research workflow.

4. Stay Organized

Maintaining an organized workspace is essential for efficient research. Keep track of your sources, notes, and references using tools like citation management software. Create a system for organizing digital files and documents, ensuring easy access and retrieval. This will save valuable time when it comes to compiling research findings and writing papers.

5. Avoid Procrastination

Procrastination is the arch-nemesis of effective time management. High school students must develop strategies to overcome this tendency and stay on track with their research. Break down tasks into smaller, manageable steps, use tools like time-tracking apps to monitor progress, and hold yourself accountable by setting deadlines and rewarding progress.

6. Seek Help and Collaboration

Don't be afraid to seek help and collaborate with others during the research process. Discuss your ideas with classmates, teachers, or mentors who can provide guidance and support. Collaboration can help generate fresh insights, provide different perspectives, and lighten the workload. Effective time management is crucial for high school students conducting research. By setting clear goals, creating schedules, utilizing technology and research tools, staying organized, avoiding procrastination, and seeking help when needed, students can optimize their time and achieve successful research outcomes.

Otio: Simplifying Research Workflows with an AI-Powered Workspace

Draft outputs using the sources you’ve collected. Otio helps you go from a reading list to the first draft faster. Along with this, Otio also helps you write research papers/essays faster.  Here are our top features that are loved by researchers: AI-generated notes on all bookmarks (Youtube videos, PDFs, articles, etc.), Otio enables you to chat with individual links or entire knowledge bases, just like you chat with ChatGPT, as well as AI-assisted writing. Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner — try Otio for free today!

• Research Paper Outline Template • Research Paper Introduction Example • Research Paper Conclusion Example • How Long Should A Research Paper Be • How To Quickly Write A Research Paper • Tips For Writing Research Papers • 7 Steps In Writing A Research Paper

In the world of research, staying organized and maintaining clarity amidst the sea of information is paramount. Otio offers a solution to this problem by providing a unified workspace for researchers. It empowers you to collect diverse data sources, extract key takeaways effortlessly, engage in source-grounded Q&A chat, and create draft outputs with ease. With Otio, researchers can navigate the content overload and embrace a more efficient and effective approach to knowledge management and research paper writing. 

Let Otio be your AI research and writing partner —try Otio for free today!

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151 Good Research Topics For High School Students

In this blog, we have discussed the research topics for high school students. Research papers allow high school students to explore academic subjects in-depth and learn how to find and analyze information. 

Selecting a good research topic can be challenging for students, as it needs to be engaging, relevant, and manageable within a school term. Current issues, science and technology, and social topics impacting teens make ideal subjects. 

Research also provides excellent opportunities for students to improve skills needed for college, such as critical thinking, sourcing quality information, and writing academic papers. Whether selecting famous historical figures, environmental issues, or teen psychology topics, students should choose research questions that excite them. 

The process teaches valuable research skills and lets students explore issues they care about. In this blog, we will discuss engaging research topics for high school students and tips to help them select the best subject for their research papers.

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Importance of Research Topics For High School Students

Table of Contents

Here are some key reasons why research topics are essential for high school students:

Develop Research And Critical Thinking Skills

Doing research allows students to learn how to find reliable information, analyze and evaluate sources, and synthesize information effectively. These skills are invaluable for college and career readiness.

Explore Passions and Interests

Research papers allow students to fully immerse themselves in a topic they care about or are curious to learn more about. This can increase engagement and inspiration to learn.

Learn Time Management and Responsibility

Completing a long-term research project requires planning, organization, and discipline. Students learn to manage their time and take responsibility for their learning.

Build Knowledge 

Deep diving into a topic through quality research allows students to build knowledge and become mini-experts. Retaining this knowledge can benefit them in the future.

Practice Academic Writing 

Research papers require students to present information in a scholarly, well-structured format. This is an excellent writing experience that prepares students for college-level writing.

Develop Presentation Skills 

Many research projects culminate in a presentation of findings. This allows students to practice public speaking and build confidence.

Gain Credibility and Recognition

High-quality research projects allow students to be recognized in their school community and beyond. This can build self-esteem.

In summary, research projects provide immense value for high school students on both academic and personal levels, making them an essential part of a well-rounded education.

Elements of a Strong Research Paper

Here are some key elements that contribute to a strong research paper:

  • Relevant, focused research question – The research question should be specific, original, and clearly stated early in the paper. It sets the direction for the whole project.
  • Strong thesis statement – The thesis presents the main argument or position of the paper. It should be concise, arguable, and supported by evidence.
  • Organized structure – The paper should follow a logical flow, starting with an introduction, body paragraphs discussing evidence, and a conclusion. Effective transitions connect ideas.
  • Reliable sources – Research studies, expert analysis, and reliable facts support claims. Varied perspectives are included.
  • Critical analysis – The paper should analyze and interpret research findings rather than just describe them. Connections to key concepts are made.
  • Clear writing style – Precise language, smooth transitions, topic sentences, and appropriate word choice improve readability. Active voice and varied sentence structure engage readers.
  • Proper formatting – Following the required style guide for citing sources and formatting elements like page numbers, headings, and title page.
  • Meticulous editing – Checking for grammar, spelling, punctuation, ambiguity, and formatting errors polishes the paper.
  • Compliance with guidelines – Adhering to all requirements set by the instructor such as word count, formatting, and submission procedures.

Students can craft excellent research papers with thoughtful research, clear writing, and meticulous editing. The process requires time and diligent work but yields valuable skills.

151 Research Topics For High School Students

Here’s a list of 151+ research topics for high school students to explore across various subjects. Feel free to modify them to suit your interests or combine different ideas:

Science and Technology

  • The impact of technology on education.
  • Advancements in renewable energy technologies.
  • Effects of climate change on biodiversity.
  • Nanotechnology applications in medicine.
  • The role of genetics in predicting diseases.
  • The future of artificial intelligence.
  • Cybersecurity: Challenges and solutions.
  • The impact of the social media on the mental health.
  • Robotics and automation in various industries.
  • Space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life.
  • CRISPR gene editing and its ethical implications.
  • The human microbiome and its influence on health.
  • Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.
  • Effects of different diets on human health.
  • The major role of stem cells in regenerative medicine.
  • Impact of pollution on aquatic ecosystems.
  • The connection between sleep patterns and academic performance.
  • Effects of various types of exercise on cardiovascular health.
  • Genetics of taste preferences.
  • Environmental conservation and endangered species protection.
  • Applications of nanomaterials in everyday life.
  • Green chemistry and sustainable practices.
  • The chemistry behind food preservation.
  • Analyzing the chemical composition of household products.
  • Investigating the pH levels of local water sources.
  • Chemical reactions in the human body.
  • The science behind the taste of different foods.
  • Synthesis and properties of biodegradable plastics.
  • Chemical analysis of air pollutants in urban areas.
  • Chemistry of cooking: Effects of different cooking methods on food.
  • The physics of sports: Analyzing the mechanics of different sports.
  • Quantum mechanics and its applications.
  • The concept of time: Physics and philosophy.
  • The physics of music: How musical instruments produce sound.
  • Applications of electromagnetic waves in daily life.
  • The science behind roller coasters.
  • Investigating the physics of climate change.
  • The relationship between mass and gravity.
  • Einstein’s theory of relativity: Understanding its principles.
  • The physics of renewable energy sources.

Environmental Science

  • Impacts of deforestation on local ecosystems.
  • Water pollution in urban areas.
  • The role of wetlands in ecological conservation.
  • Sustainable agriculture practices.
  • Plastic pollution in oceans: Causes and solutions.
  • The results of air pollution on the respiratory health.
  • Urban heat islands: Causes and mitigation.
  • Impact of invasive species on local biodiversity.
  • Analyzing the environmental footprint of different diets.
  • The significance of the biodiversity in supporting ecosystem balance.

Social Sciences

  • The influence of social media on political opinions.
  • Effects of bullying on mental health.
  • Gender stereotypes in the media.
  • The impact of video games on behavior.
  • Teen mental health: Identifying risk factors.
  • Cultural diversity in schools and its effects on education.
  • The role of family dynamics in shaping personality.
  • Impact of social isolation on well-being.
  • Analyzing the effectiveness of anti-drug campaigns.
  • The connection between socioeconomic status & academic achievement.
  • The effects of music on mood and cognition.
  • Sleep patterns and their impact on mental health.
  • The psychology of decision-making.
  • Factors influencing academic motivation.
  • Impact of social media on body image.
  • The role of nature vs. nurture in personality development.
  • Effects of mindfulness meditation on stress reduction.
  • The psychology of laughter: Why do we laugh?
  • The impact of positive affirmations on self-esteem.
  • Analyzing the placebo effect in medical treatments.
  • The impact of World War II on international geopolitics.
  • Civil rights movements and their legacy.
  • The role of women in historical revolutions.
  • The effects of colonialism on indigenous cultures.
  • Historical analysis of pandemics and their aftermath.
  • The Industrial Revolution and its social consequences.
  • The history of human rights movements.
  • The legacy of ancient civilizations on modern society.
  • Causes and consequences of the Cold War.
  • Historical development of democracy around the world.

Literature and Language Arts

  • Analysis of symbolism in a specific literary work.
  • The evolution of language and its impact on communication.
  • The portrayal of mental illness in literature.
  • The influence of science fiction on technological innovation.
  • The major role of folklore in shaping cultural identity.
  • Shakespearean plays: Themes and contemporary relevance.
  • Gender representation in literature.
  • The impact of censorship on literary works.
  • Analyzing the use of metaphors in poetry.
  • The influence of literature on social change.

Mathematics

  • The history and applications of fractals.
  • Cryptography: The mathematics of secure communication.
  • Mathematical modeling of population growth.
  • The role of mathematics in computer programming.
  • Analyzing the geometry of famous landmarks.
  • The mathematics behind music: Patterns and rhythms.
  • Game theory and its applications in decision-making.
  • Fibonacci sequence and its occurrences in nature.
  • Analyzing the statistics of a specific real-world phenomenon.
  • The concept of infinity in mathematics.
  • The impact of globalization on local economies.
  • Income inequality and its consequences.
  • The economics of climate change mitigation.
  • The role of small businesses in economic development.
  • The effects of automation on employment.
  • Consumer behavior and the psychology of spending.
  • Economic analysis of a specific industry.
  • The relationship between education and economic success.
  • The impact of government policies on economic growth.
  • Analyzing economic systems: Capitalism, socialism, and communism.

Political Science

  • The role of political parties in shaping procedures.
  • The impact of lobbying on political decision-making.
  • The history and consequences of political revolutions.
  • Electoral systems: A comparative analysis.
  • The influence of media on political opinions.
  • Human rights and their enforcement on the global stage.
  • The role of diplomacy in international relations.
  • Political corruption and its impact on society.
  • The concept of political ideology: Origins and evolution.
  • The role of grassroots movements in political change.

Health and Nutrition

  • The impact of fast food on health.
  • The benefits of a plant-based diet.
  • Exercise and its effects on mental health.
  • The role of core microbiota in digestion and immunity.
  • The psychology of eating disorders.
  • The relationship between stress and physical health.
  • Analysis of different diet trends.
  • The impact of sleep on overall well-being.
  • Effects of advertising on food choices and nutrition.
  • Public health initiatives: Successes and challenges.
  • The effectiveness of online learning platforms.
  • The impact of standardized testing on education.
  • The role of teachers in student motivation.
  • Inclusive education and its benefits.
  • School uniforms: Pros and cons.
  • The effect of parent’s involvement on academic success.
  • The importance of arts education in schools.
  • Analyzing the benefits of extracurricular activities.
  • The role of technology in modern classrooms.
  • Homeschooling: Factors influencing its success.

Art and Music

  • The evolution of hip-hop music and its cultural impact.
  • The role of art treatment in mental health treatment.
  • Cultural influences on visual arts.
  • Exploring the use of color in famous paintings.
  • The impact of technology on music production.
  • The intersection of art and technology in contemporary society.
  • Cultural appropriation in the arts.
  • The influence of political events on artistic expression.
  • The history and significance of a specific art movement.
  • Analyzing the symbolism in a particular piece of artwork.
  • The relationship between music and memory.

How to Pick the Right Research Topic

Here are some tips for picking the right research topic as a high school student:

  • Choose a topic that genuinely interests you. Researching and writing about something intriguing will make the process more enjoyable and rewarding.
  • Make sure the topic is narrow and focused enough to be manageable. Don’t pick subjects that are too broad or vague.
  • Consider your research resources – access to primary sources, scholarly articles, experts to interview, etc. Pick a feasible topic.
  • Select a topic that is original and where you can offer a new perspective or angle. Avoid overdone topics.
  • Ensure the topic is relevant to your class objectives or allows you to demonstrate core skills. Consult your teacher.
  • Pick a topic that challenges you intellectually but is still within your capability. Balance ambition with practicality.
  • Look for available research topics that provide enough evidence and detail to support your thesis.
  • Consider topics that connect to your personal experiences, background, or community. These can offer passion.
  • If allowed, pick something enjoyable like music, sports, technology, or pop culture. Interest keeps you motivated.
  • Bounce ideas on your teacher or librarian for feedback. They can help assess research viability.

With the right topic, you’re off to an excellent start on your research paper! Allow time to refine your direction as the work progresses.

Final Remarks

In conclusion, selecting the right research topic is crucial for high school students. It engages them in academic exploration and cultivates essential skills for their future. Research enhances critical thinking, source evaluation, and practical information synthesis – all valuable for college readiness. 

Exploring personal interests boosts engagement and inspiration while instilling time management and responsibility. A solid research paper requires a focused question, a robust thesis, an organized structure, and critical analysis. Students also learn the art of clear writing, proper formatting, and meticulous editing. 

The journey offers a chance to become mini-experts, practice academic writing, develop presentation skills, and gain recognition. The significance of research topics extends beyond the classroom, contributing to a well-rounded education and preparing students for future challenges.

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110+ Best Scientific Research Topics for High School Students: Igniting Curiosity

Scientific Research Topics for High School Students

  • Post author By admin
  • September 25, 2023

Explore a wide range of scientific research topics for high school students. Expand your knowledge and enhance your academic journey.

Imagine, You, a high school student, donning a lab coat or wielding a microscope, uncovering the mysteries of the universe one experiment at a time. Exciting, right?

But here is the catch, choosing the right research topic is quite important for the high school students. Beacause it can help them to standout in the class.

In this blog post you are going to find out some of the best scientific research topics that offers lots of opportunities to learn and explore the scientific world. So get ready to explore them right now.

Table of Contents

The Importance of Choosing the Right Topic

Have a close look at the importance of choosing the right topic:-

Stay Curious and Excited

Your research topic should be like that thrilling book you can’t put down – it keeps you curious and eager to dive in.

Practicality is Key

Think of it as fitting the right shoes for a hike; your topic needs to match the resources, time, and skills you have.

Be a Real-world Problem Solver

A good topic isn’t just for your benefit; it can help tackle real-world issues, like a superhero swooping in to save the day.

Stay on Course

Your topic is like the North Star; it guides your research journey, making sure you don’t get lost in the vast sea of knowledge.

Let Passion Drive You

Your topic should be something that keeps you awake at night with excitement – it’s your research’s secret sauce.

Open Doors to Opportunities

Choose wisely, and your topic could be the key to unlocking academic and career doors you never knew existed.

Add to the Collective Wisdom

Your research can be a puzzle piece in the grand mosaic of human knowledge – it’s your chance to contribute.

Grow Personally and Intellectually

Research isn’t just about facts; it’s a personal journey of growth, challenging you to think, learn, and communicate.

Embrace Innovation

A unique topic can be your ticket to thinking outside the box and coming up with groundbreaking ideas.

Claim Your Spotlight

If you’re passionate and your topic is right, you might just find yourself in the spotlight, with peers and mentors applauding your work.

Achieve Personal Fulfillment

Successfully researching a topic you love can bring a deep sense of accomplishment and joy.

Tips for Selecting a Research Topic

Choosing a research topic is like picking a movie to watch on a Friday night – it should be exciting and capture your interest. To help you find that perfect topic, here are some tips that feel like advice from a friend:

Follow Your Passion

Start with what makes your heart race with curiosity. Think about the subjects or issues that genuinely excite you – that’s where your research journey should begin.

Consider Your Resources

Imagine you’re a chef choosing ingredients for a new recipe. Your topic should align with the “ingredients” you have, whether it’s access to a lab, experts, or specific research tools.

Look for Real-world Relevance

Think of your research as a chance to change the world, even in a small way. Find topics that connect to real-world problems or gaps in knowledge – that’s where the magic happens.

Explore Unanswered Questions

Think of research as detective work. Scan the existing knowledge in your field and look for unsolved mysteries or gaps. Your research could be the missing puzzle piece.

Brainstorm and Mind-map

Get a notepad and brainstorm your interests. Make a mind map with your passions in the center, and let it grow like a tree with branches of related topics. It’s like planting the seeds of your research.

Discuss with Mentors

Imagine your mentors as treasure maps to research gold. Seek their wisdom and guidance; they might lead you to hidden gems of topics.

Consider Multidisciplinary Topics

Sometimes, the most exciting adventures happen when you cross borders. Explore topics that blend different fields – it’s like mixing your favorite flavors for a new dish.

Narrow it Down

Think of your topics as outfits for a special occasion. Try them on for size and consider factors like feasibility, relevance, and your personal interest to see which one fits the best.

Stay Open to Change

Think of your research journey as a winding road; sometimes, you might take a different turn. Be open to evolving interests as you dive deeper into your topic.

Read Widely

Dive into the world of research literature like you’re exploring a library full of secrets. The more you read, the clearer your path becomes.

Seek Feedback

Imagine your friends as your personal focus group. Share your ideas with them and see which ones light up their eyes. Their feedback can be invaluable.

Trust Your Instincts

Picture your topic choice as a conversation with your gut feeling. If it excites you and feels like the right choice, it probably is. Your enthusiasm will be your guiding star.

So, as you embark on your research journey, think of these tips as your trusty companions, guiding you towards that perfect topic – the one that makes your research adventure a truly thrilling experience.

Scientific Research Topics for High School Students

Have a close look at scientific research topics for high school students:-

  • Investigating the Effect of Various Fertilizers on Plant Growth
  • Analyzing the Impact of Different Light Sources on Photosynthesis in Aquatic Plants
  • Studying the Behavior of Ants in Response to Environmental Changes
  • Exploring the Microbial Diversity in Soil Samples from Different Ecosystems
  • Investigating the Effect of Temperature on the Lifespan of Fruit Flies
  • Analyzing the Antibacterial Properties of Natural Substances like Honey or Garlic
  • Studying the Impact of Pollution on Aquatic Life in Local Rivers
  • Investigating the Genetics of Taste Perception Among Family Members
  • Analyzing the Growth Patterns of Mold on Different Types of Food
  • Exploring the Impact of Music on the Heart Rate of Animals (e.g., Dogs, Cats, Fish).
  • Testing the pH Levels of Different Brands of Bottled Water
  • Investigating the Chemical Reactions Involved in Food Preservation Methods (e.g., Canning, Freezing, Drying)
  • Analyzing the Effects of Different Types of Salt on Ice Melting
  • Studying the Chemical Composition of Various Brands of Household Cleaners
  • Investigating the Electrolyte Levels in Common Sports Drinks
  • Exploring the Chemical Reactions Behind the Colors in Fireworks
  • Testing the Efficiency of Homemade vs. Commercial Cleaning Products
  • Investigating the Effects of Household Ingredients on Rust Formation
  • Analyzing the Chemical Changes in Food During Cooking
  • Studying the Oxidation Rate of Different Types of Cooking Oils.
  • Experimenting with Different Materials to Create Solar Cells
  • Investigating the Factors Affecting the Swing of a Pendulum
  • Analyzing the Relationship Between Surface Area and Air Resistance
  • Studying the Properties of Lenses and Their Applications in Optics
  • Investigating the Physics of Simple Machines (e.g., Levers, Pulleys)
  • Exploring the Relationship Between Magnetic Fields and Electricity Generation
  • Testing the Effect of Different Materials on Sound Insulation
  • Investigating the Behavior of Different Materials Under Pressure
  • Analyzing the Impact of Projectile Mass on Distance Traveled
  • Studying the Properties of Elastic Materials (e.g., Rubber Bands, Springs).

Environmental Science

  • Measuring Air Quality in Various Locations within Your Community
  • Investigating the Effects of Urbanization on Local Bird Populations
  • Analyzing Soil Composition in Different Types of Ecosystems (e.g., Forest, Desert)
  • Studying the Impact of Land Use on Water Quality in Local Rivers
  • Investigating the Efficiency of Different Water Filtration Methods
  • Exploring the Effects of Climate Change on Local Plant Phenology (e.g., Flowering, Leafing)
  • Testing the Biodegradability of Common Plastics in Different Environments
  • Investigating the Impact of Noise Pollution on Wildlife Behavior
  • Analyzing the Biodiversity of Microorganisms in Freshwater Ecosystems
  • Studying the Effects of Light Pollution on Nocturnal Animal Behavior.
  • Observing and Tracking the Movements of a Specific Celestial Body (e.g., Mars, Jupiter)
  • Investigating the Effects of Light Pollution on Night Sky Visibility
  • Analyzing Data from a Solar Observation and Creating Sunspot Predictions
  • Studying the Impact of Solar Flares on Earth’s Magnetosphere
  • Investigating the Relationship Between Planetary Orbits and Climate Change on Earth
  • Exploring the Search for Exoplanets Using Transit Photometry
  • Testing the Effects of Different Filters on Astronomical Telescopes
  • Investigating the Rotation Periods of Asteroids Through Observational Data
  • Analyzing Stellar Spectra and Classifying Stars Based on Their Characteristics
  • Studying the Formation and Properties of Galactic Superclusters.
  • Investigating the Impact of Social Media Use on Teenagers’ Sleep Patterns
  • Studying the Effects of Different Learning Styles on Academic Performance
  • Analyzing the Relationship Between Screen Time and Attention Span in Children
  • Investigating the Role of Stress in Memory Formation and Recall
  • Exploring the Impact of Color on Emotional Responses in Art and Design
  • Testing the Effect of Mindfulness Meditation on Stress Reduction
  • Investigating the Connection Between Music Preferences and Personality Traits
  • Analyzing the Influence of Parental Involvement on Children’s Self-esteem
  • Studying the Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Function in the Elderly
  • Investigating the Psychological Factors Behind Decision-Making in Risky Situations.
:

How to Develop a Research Question

Think of developing a research question like embarking on a treasure hunt. Your question is the map that will guide you to the hidden gems of knowledge.

Here’s your compass for crafting a research question that’s not just sharp but exciting:

Start with What Fires You Up

Begin with a topic that genuinely piques your curiosity. Think of it as choosing the theme for your grand adventure.

For example, if you’re into climate change, begin with questions like, “What’s up with climate change’s impact?” or “How does it shake up our ecosystems?”

Dive into the Research Ocean

Before you set your question in stone, go snorkeling in the sea of existing research. Explore journals, books, and online sources that relate to your topic. This is like checking out the maps to see where others have explored.

X Marks the Spot

Keep an eye out for uncharted territory. As you read, you’ll notice gaps in the knowledge or conflicting information. These are the hidden treasures you want to uncover with your research.

Precision is Key

Now, it’s time to put on your archaeologist’s hat. Narrow your question down to a specific focus. Instead of asking, “How does climate change affect ecosystems?” try, “What happens to the daily behavior of local bird species when temperatures rise in a specific forest ecosystem?”

Make Sure It’s Investigable

You’ll need to be Sherlock Holmes here. Ensure your question is something you can investigate – gather evidence, conduct experiments, or analyze data to answer it. If it’s too vague, it’s like hunting a ghost.

Speak Plainly

Your research question shouldn’t sound like it’s written in a secret code. Keep it clear and straightforward, like a friendly guide leading a group of explorers.

Use PICO(T) if You’re a Health Detective

If your research deals with health or clinical sciences, think of yourself as a detective and use the PICO(T) framework to frame your question:

P: Who’s the main character? (The population)

I: What’s the intervention or exposure? (The twist in the story)

C: Is there a comparison to make? (The alternative path)

O: What’s the outcome you’re hunting for? (The treasure)

T: When’s this adventure happening? (The time frame)

Test Your Question

Before you set sail on your research journey, gather your crew (mentors or friends) and test your question. Make sure it’s easy to understand and seems doable. It’s like doing a trial run before the real adventure.

Be Open to Plot Twists

Remember, just like in a thrilling story, your research question might evolve as you dig deeper. Don’t be afraid to adjust it if you stumble upon new clues during your research expedition .

So, crafting your research question is like drawing the map to your very own research treasure. Make it intriguing, precise, and let it lead you to discoveries that will make your scientific journey an epic adventure.

The Research Process

Have a close look a the research process:-

Craft Your Research Question

Think of this as marking your destination on the map. Your research question should be clear and captivating, like the quest that beckons you into the wilderness. It sets the stage for your entire adventure.

Dive into the Existing Knowledge Ocean

Before you embark on your journey, gather your maps and lore. Delve into the existing body of research, like reading ancient scrolls and deciphering hidden codes. This not only helps you understand what others have discovered but also reveals the uncharted territories.

Plan Your Expedition

Just like an intrepid traveler, chart your course. Decide how you’ll collect your precious artifacts (data) – will it be through experiments, surveys, interviews, or analyzing existing records? Create a roadmap (research plan) with milestones to guide you.

Embark on Your Quest

Now, it’s time to set sail on your research ship. Venture into the field, collect your data, or delve into archives like an archaeologist hunting for relics. Take careful notes, as these are the pieces of the puzzle.

Uncover the Hidden Truths

Back at your research camp, it’s time to scrutinize your treasures. Use your magnifying glass (data analysis tools) to unearth patterns, connections, and revelations hidden within your findings.

Decipher the Clues

As you uncover the secrets, don your detective’s hat. What do these findings reveal about your original quest? Are there unexpected twists in the plot?

Claim Your Discovery

With your investigations complete, you reach the heart of the treasure vault. Draw your conclusions. Do they confirm or challenge your initial theories? This is the moment you unveil your findings.

Share Your Tale

Every great explorer returns home with stories of their adventures. In the world of research, this means sharing your discoveries. Write your research paper, like a memoir of your quest, detailing your methods, findings, and conclusions.

Reflect and Refine

Just as explorers grow wiser with each journey, reflect on your research odyssey. What worked splendidly, and where could you enhance your methods? Use these insights to prepare for your next voyage.

Keep the Flame Alive

Remember, your quest for knowledge is an endless adventure. Your discoveries may lead to more questions, uncharted territories, and grander adventures. Embrace the thrill of the unknown, and continue your quest.

Honor the Code

Throughout your journey, uphold the ethical code of the scholar. Respect the rights and dignity of all who share your path. Be scrupulous in citing your sources and maintain the highest standards of integrity.

Seek Companions and Allies

In this grand adventure, don’t hesitate to seek the guidance and camaraderie of fellow explorers. Collaboration can turn a solo quest into an epic expedition.

What are some good research topics for high school students?

Have a close look at some of good research topics for high school students:-

  • The Impact of Climate Change on Local Ecosystems
  • Investigating the Genetics of Inherited Diseases
  • Understanding the Effects of Different Diets on Gut Microbiota
  • Exploring the Impact of Pollution on Local Water Bodies and Aquatic Life
  • Analyzing the Behavior of Ants in Response to Environmental Changes
  • Studying the Chemical Composition of Common Household Products
  • Investigating the Effects of Various Types of Cooking Oils on Food Quality
  • Analyzing the Efficiency of Natural vs. Synthetic Water Purification Methods
  • Exploring the Chemical Reactions Behind Food Preservation Techniques
  • Investigating the Properties of Different Types of Plastics and Their Environmental Impact
  • Examining the Relationship Between Mass and Acceleration
  • Investigating the Behavior of Light Waves in Different Mediums
  • Studying the Factors Affecting the Motion of Pendulums
  • Analyzing the Impact of Different Materials on Heat Conductivity
  • Exploring the Physics of Renewable Energy Sources
  • Assessing Air Quality in Various Locations within the Community
  • Investigating the Impact of Urbanization on Local Bird Populations
  • Analyzing Soil Composition in Different Ecosystems (e.g., Forest, Wetland)
  • Exploring Sustainable Agriculture Practices to Reduce Soil Erosion
  • Studying the Effects of Climate Change on Local Wildlife Migration Patterns
  • Observing and Tracking the Movements of Celestial Bodies (e.g., Planets, Stars)
  • Analyzing the Formation and Properties of Galactic Superclusters
  • Investigating the Influence of Social Media on Teenagers’ Mental Health
  • Studying the Effects of Music on Cognitive Performance
  • Analyzing the Relationship Between Sleep Patterns and Academic Performance
  • Exploring the Impact of Bullying on Adolescent Mental Health
  • Investigating the Cognitive Development of Children in Different Environments

Feel free to choose any of these topics based on your interests and available resources for your research project.

What is a good 9th grade research topic?

Have a close look at good 9th grade research topic:-

How Does Music Affect Our Concentration?Investigate how different types of music influence our ability to focus and concentrate.
The Impact of Social Media on Teenagers’ Mental HealthExplore how excessive use of social media platforms affects the mental well-being of teenagers.
Investigating the Effects of Climate Change on Local EcosystemsStudy the consequences of climate change on local plants, animals, and ecosystems in your region.
The Chemistry of Baking Soda and Vinegar ReactionsDiscover the chemical reactions that occur when baking soda and vinegar are mixed together.
How Do Different Types of Exercise Affect Heart Rate?Investigate how various forms of physical activity, such as jogging, cycling, or jumping rope, impact heart rate.
The Influence of Family Dynamics on Academic PerformanceExplore how family structure and dynamics can affect a student’s academic success and well-being.
The Effects of Bullying on School Attendance and PerformanceAnalyze the impact of bullying on students’ attendance, academic performance, and overall psychological well-being.
The Role of Nutrition in Adolescents’ Physical and Mental HealthInvestigate how a balanced diet and nutritional choices influence the physical and mental health of teenagers.
Does Screen Time Before Bed Affect Sleep Quality?Research the effects of using smartphones and other screens before bedtime on sleep quality and duration in adolescents.
The Psychology of Peer Pressure in Adolescent Decision-MakingStudy how peer pressure influences teenagers’ decision-making processes and behavior.

These research topics are suitable for 9th-grade students, covering a range of subjects and providing opportunities for critical thinking and investigation.

Students can choose a topic that aligns with their interests and resources for their research project.

When you’re choosing your topic, you have to be more specific with it. Because it is not just a part of an assignment but also playing a leading role in order to learn new things and clear the concepts.

All those skills you’re building along the way – like thinking critically, solving everyday problems, and explaining your discoveries – they’re like secret superpowers you’ll use in school and life.

So, whether you’re peering through microscopes, mixing up potions, or stargazing, savor every moment. Your curiosity is your trusty sidekick, and knowledge is the treasure you’re after. So, enjoy every bit of your research journey, and may it lead you to amazing discoveries!

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the significance of scientific research for high school students.

Engaging in scientific research in high school enhances critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and a passion for science. It also prepares students for future academic and career opportunities.

How do I narrow down my research topic?

To narrow down your research topic, start with a broad area of interest, conduct a literature review, and formulate a specific research question based on existing gaps in knowledge.

Can I collaborate with professionals or university researchers?

Collaborating with professionals or university researchers can be a valuable experience. Reach out to local institutions or researchers who may be willing to mentor or collaborate with you.

What are the best sources for scientific literature?

Utilize reputable sources such as academic journals, library databases, and educational websites. Your school or local library can provide access to many of these resources.

How can I make my research stand out?

To make your research stand out, choose a unique and relevant topic, conduct thorough and well-designed experiments or studies, and effectively communicate your findings through presentations and reports.

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Unleashing Creativity in Research: How High Schoolers Can Find Unique and Engaging Research Topics

Unleashing Creativity in Research: How High Schoolers Can Find Unique and Engaging Research Topics

In a competitive college admissions landscape, research accomplishments can help make you stand out, both academically and in terms of extracurriculars. But to achieve these goals, you need to start with a unique and engaging research topic. In this blog post we explain the importance of high school research projects for college admissions, share expert tips for finding your own compelling research topics, and offer you lots of examples of great research topics in different subject areas.

The Importance of Research for High Schoolers

Academic knowledge is driven by inquiry, and virtually all inquiry prompts us to engage in research that advances learning or solves problems. Not only will you need research skills to excel in college, but engaging in high-quality research projects while you’re still in high school can do a lot more than just get you a better grade.

For example, engaging in original research that aligns with your personal passions is a great way to spotlight you curiosity and motivation. And, if you tailor your research project to dovetail with other scholars’ interests, or with a compelling practical application or area of public interest, you’re already spotlighting for admissions officers your ability to apply learning to real life problem solving and public service.

Finally, because a sophisticated research project hones core academic skills, boosts subject-matter learning dramatically, and showcases your academic drive and motivation, an extracurricular research project can go a long way in elevating your college admissions profile!

Great Research Starts with a Great Research Topic

To get the most of a research project, it’s crucial to start with a unique and compelling research topic.

With a research topic that’s relevant and engaging, you’ll get more for the time and effort you’ll be investing in your research project.

Here’s just some of the benefits you can get from a well-designed research project with an interesting and relevant research topic:

  • learn new information that’s not covered in your regular classes
  • discover cutting-edge ideas, interests, and unanswered questions in your field of interest
  • move from passive learning to actively exploring hypotheses and contributing to academic conversations to science, to public policy, or to problem solving
  • make important strides as a student, by consolidating your learning and contributing new insights to your field of interest

With research projects offering so many benefits for high school students, it’s crucial to remember that all winning research starts with a winning research topic!

So let’s get started!

How to Develop a Great Research Topic

Researching something you’re passionate about that’s original, relevant, and compelling is key to turning your research effort into something that really helps you grow and stand out academically.

But, if you aren’t going to settle for an overly cliche or general research topic, how do you find one that’s truly engaging and also right for your interests?

Using a thorough and tested multi-step process is probably the best way to chart your own path to a unique and engaging research topic.

  • Brainstorming: Good old-fashioned brainstorming is almost certain to help you tap into your own passions and jumpstart the work of developing a great topic. You’re likely to surprise yourself with your own creativity. Be sure to write your ideas down; then finish this step by creating a “short list” of the topic ideas you believe to be most promising.
  • Exploratory Research: Sometimes you just need to know a bit more about an area of research in order to come up with the best research topics. Exploratory research is often easy to do online, and is a great way to get insights into the subject matter terrain you’re considering in order to:
  • find additional topic ideas
  • deepen or narrow a topic idea
  • decide if a topic is worth pursuing further

TIP: If you’re exploring topics for a PERSONAL ESSAY for college applications, be sure to check out Crimson Education’s Free Topic & Idea Generator .

Or, do you want to learn more about research-focused extracurriculars for high schoolers , with added guidance and learning in the form research mentorships, internship placements, proposal writing competitions, or summer research intensives? If so, reach out to a Crimson Education Advisor for more information.

  • Defining and Refining Your Research Topic or Question: A research paper or project typically involves more than just a short essay: you’ll have to craft a driving question or hypothesis and synthesize information from a variety of sources:
  • Is your  topic broad enough to invite meaningful inquiry?
  • Is it complex enough to incorporate and evaluate competing perspectives?
  • Is there a way to use specific experiments, examples, or case study approaches in order to keep the project focused?
  • Outside Guidance and Advice: Getting guidance and input from teachers or professors, other mentors, or industry professionals can be immensely valuable for uncovering new topics or for refining your existing topic ideas!

TIP: Many professionals find it gratifying to talk about their work with an interested young scholar, so don’t be afraid to ask someone in the field for input — it’s a great way to get an expert perspective can really transform a good research topic into a great one.

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Examples of Research Topics Across Disciplines

We’ve covered a lot of ground already, but maybe you’re still wondering, okay, what does a good research topic look like?

As you review the examples below, you can evaluate them on your own by asking yourself:

  • Is the topic open-ended enough?  Can the topic be explored with evidence, critical thinking, a case study approach, or some form of scientific method?
  • Is the topic relevant and interesting? Does the topic advance scholarly or academic conversations? Or contribute to an area of public interest or social debate? Or have some kind of scientific value?

Topics in Schools & Education

  • Should high schools re-invest in vocational education or focus exclusively on a college prep curriculum?
  • Should ethnic studies courses and curricula in public schools be required, optional, or eliminated ?
  • How can we predict the impacts tools like Chat-GPT will have on student learning?
  • Should countries have national curriculum standards, or should local communities and school boards decide what is taught in schools?
  • Have charter schools helped the US improve the public education system?
  • What countries appear to have the best education systems and what features do they have in common, if any?

Topics in History

  • What do important examples in history teach us about the causes of civil war and how to prevent civil war?
  • Abraham Lincoln and Franklin D. Roosevelt are among the highest ranking US presidents, based on scholarly estimations and public opinions. What do their presidencies teach us about the qualities of great political leadership?
  • What constitutes the US’s greatest military or national defense failure? What lessons  can policymakers draw from it?
  • Does the history of the Israel-Palestine conflict offer any insights into how to end it today?
  • What can we learn about democracy today based on the successes and failures of ancient experiments in democracy?
  • If used as primary source evidence by historians, how can art illuminate social history or social progress?

Topics in Government

  • Should we protect or abolish the Electoral College in the US?
  • Using Canada as a model, what are the pros and cons of a nationalized healthcare system?
  • Is affirmative action good public policy?
  • Should we reform the US Supreme Court? Why or why not?
  • Using carbon cap & trade policy, or a similar economic policy as an example, how effective are economic incentives for solving big social problems?
  • Should there be a global revenue tax on large global technology companies?
  • Should industrial countries do more to help developing countries cope with the effects of climate change?

Topics in Literature

  • How does literature give a voice to the voiceless?
  • Why are some books banned or censored?
  • Is literature educational or just entertainment?
  • Do graphic novels count as literature?
  • What characterizes the works of authors who have won Nobel Prizes for literature?
  • Can literature —  in the form of novels, short stories, essays, or plays — change the course of history?

Topics in Society, Health, & Human Psychology

  • What are the best ways to reduce and prevent bullying?
  • Should we criminalize hate speech?
  • Since loneliness has been shown to decrease life expectancy, are there any promising ways to combat it?
  • What can schools do to help reduce mental health suffering in teens and young adults?
  • Do we truly live in an “age of anxiety”? What do the indicators tell us about the scope of the problem and possible remedies?

Topics in Sports

  • Should college athletes get paid?
  • What are the benefits and downsides of participating in athletics in high school?
  • What sports should be eliminated from the Olympics and which ones added? Why?
  • How can we use sports to increase international goodwill and cooperation?

Topics in Technology and Social Media

  • Should there be more age restrictions on social media access?
  • How can society address hate speech and/or disinformation in social media?
  • Should employers encourage or discourage more remote work arrangements?

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Interdisciplinary Examples

Another great way to pick a research topic is to explore interdisciplinary areas of research . In fact, many engaging research topics are going to naturally encompass different disciplines.

Here are some examples of topics that bridge two or more disciplines:

  • What concept(s) from the field of economics might help us find ways to improve education?
  • How can we use marketing principles to develop better public awareness campaigns for reducing teen vaping?
  • Does participating in team sports help improve mental health?
  • How can we apply insights from either microeconomics or from organizational psychology to improve health and fitness?
  • How can concepts from the study of linguistics help us understand political messaging and address political polarization?
  • What are additional ways we can leverage economic incentives to combat global warming?
  • Does mainstream advertising have an impact on social prejudices and stereotypes?

The Social Impact Factor

You should always consider if there are ways to shape your research topic to make your research project more relevant and consequential.

As an illustration, look at the two pairs of research topics below.

Compare the topics in each pair. Does A) or B) have more relevance or urgency in your opinion? Why?

A) What are the personal benefits of participating in team sports?

B) How can we use access to team sports programs in high schools to address today’s teen mental health crisis?

A) How can we use insights from linguistics to promote nonviolence and conflict resolution?

B) How can we use insights from linguistics to reduce extreme political polarization?

If your research topic address a clear “need,” “challenge” or “problem,” your audience is likely to find the topic more engaging and relevant.

What to Do When You’re Not Sure You Have a Good Research Topic?

If you’re not sure if you have a good topic, use the simple rubric below and see how your topic stacks up.

Compelling interest and social relevance. Does your research topic set you up to shed light on an important academic or scientific question? Does it illuminate a controversial and consequential social issue? Will it help solve a consequential problem? If so, you have a topic that will help you stay motivated and be more engaging for your audience.

Personally fulfilling. Whatever research topic you choose, it needs to be a research topic that relates to your own learning interests and passions, otherwise it’s hard to imagine that you’ll get the results you hoped for.

Important academic considerations. A good essay topic will offer valuable benefits for your academic growth and college journey: enhancing and accelerating your learning in one or more disciplines you enjoy studying and boosting your overall academic profile.

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Research Resources

Once you’ve selected a research topic, you’ll obviously need to gather information from various sources and synthesize it into a coherent set of claims, findings, or arguments.

Here's a list of basic research tools and resources that you might find useful:

Libraries and Librarians

Libraries, especially academic libraries, are the researcher’s paradise.

If there’s a drawback to libraries, it’s not a lack of resources, but the challenge of finding your way to what’s most useful and relevant!

Fortunately, most libraries come with librarians who are trained to help researchers find the right resources, so don’t be afraid to ask for help!

Popular Kinds of Library Research Resources

Books: Useful for in-depth information, background information, historical context.

TIP: Don’t worry about how “long” a book is — use the table of contents and indexes to navigate to the information you need.

Academic Journals: Get scholarly articles useful for gathering more specialized and more up-to-date information about your topic.

Magazines and Newspapers: Good resources for getting interesting quotes from experts in a current events context or for exploring diverse public perspectives and viewpoints.

Online Platforms and Databases: Although some of these, such as Google Scholar are free and easy to access from any computer and internet browser, it’s often easier to get free access to many others with the help of a school or public library acting as an intermediary. Also, there are so many digital resources and databases, that we recommend getting assistance in this area from a trained librarian.

Reference Librarians: Last but not at all least, take advantage of librarians! They are not a direct research source of course, but may help you navigate quickly to the most useful research resources for your particular topic.

TIP: In many larger libraries, the librarians specially trained to help patrons with research are commonly referred to as reference librarians.

Internet Search Engines

Most young scholars today are already well acquainted with internet searches and search engines, with Google and Bing among the most popular.

Here’s a few tips for upping your internet search prowess:

  • Refine your search parameters with more sophisticated search terms and search engine settings
  • Know how to identify trustworthy and reliable internet sources

Educational Websites

There are a number of .edu websites operated by reputable sources that provide access to a range of educational content for students at different grade levels. Here are just a few examples:

  • Khan Academy: Comprehensive overviews and instructional videos on a variety of subjects
  • BBC Bitesize: Provides study guides for different topics (especially for UK curriculum)
  • National Geographic Education: Great for geography, history, and science topics
  • The Learning Network: (NY Times): Educational perspectives on a wide range of current events topics
  • The PBS Newshour Classroom: A respected educational website covering a range of topics

Government and Organization Websites

There are also lots of government ( .gov ) websites offering useful information for researchers. An upside of .gov websites is they are among the most objective and reliable sources of information, appropriate for academic research. Examples in the US include:

  • The White House
  • The Department of State
  • Science.gov
  • Department of Justice
  • Department of Agriculture
  • Department of Education

Websites operated by large, well-established, and highly reputable organizations are also typically good sources of information for researchers.

Examples could be highly reputable news organizations , such as US News and World Report , The BBC , Time Magazine , or The New York Times . Most of these news outlets also have searchable online resources.

Alternately, large international organizations , such as the United Nations or the World Health Organization, or the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation can also be reliable sources of information.

Documentaries and Educational Videos

Easy to overlook as research resources are any number of educational videos, podcasts, and documentary films.

YouTube educational channels such as CrashCourse and TED-Ed are two examples.

Likewise, ordinary streaming services may also list informative, high-quality documentaries.

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Final Thoughts

In this post, we've explored a wide array of strategies and considerations for choosing a compelling research topic. From brainstorming and exploratory research to defining and refining your topic with guidance from mentors and professionals, the journey to selecting the right topic is as important as the research itself!

The Power of a Good Topic: Remember, an intriguing and relevant topic will not only captivate your audience but keep you motivated to the finish line.

Aligning with Your Interests: Does your topic resonate with your personal learning interests and goals? This alignment is crucial for achieving fulfilling and meaningful outcomes.

Practical Considerations: Consider how your chosen topic can enhance your understanding and passion in your field of study, especially in the context of your future academic and career goals.

Finally, don't underestimate the value of the resources and tools available for research exploration.

From online search to electronic databases and journals, to librarians themselves, these tools are pivotal in helping you refine your research interests and embark on a successful research project.

Interested in exploring more options for pre-college research experiences? Want information about more advanced research mentorships, competitions, internships, or initiatives? Connecting with a Crimson Education Advisor is the best way to find opportunities like these, both online and around the world, based on your individual interests and preferences.

These opportunities can take you well beyond ordinary classroom research assignments, connecting you with like-minded peers for group projects, with schools hosting summer research intensives or fun and prestigious research competitions, or with university mentors…

We’ve helped thousands of students just like you elevate their extracurriculars with opportunities like these! Contact a friendly Crimson Education Advisor today and find out what you can do…

Finally, stay tuned for future blogs that explore extracurriculars, interesting future careers, diverse majors, and insights for boosting your university admissions strategy!

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About the Author

Keith Nickolaus

Keith Nickolaus

Keith Nickolaus is a former educator with a passion for languages, literature, and lifelong learning. After obtaining a B.A. from UC Santa Cruz and exploring university life in Paris, Keith earned his Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley, and then worked for 16 years in K12 education before setting up shop as a freelance writer.

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General Education

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One of the hardest parts of writing a research paper can be just finding a good topic to write about. Fortunately we've done the hard work for you and have compiled a list of 113 interesting research paper topics. They've been organized into ten categories and cover a wide range of subjects so you can easily find the best topic for you.

In addition to the list of good research topics, we've included advice on what makes a good research paper topic and how you can use your topic to start writing a great paper.

What Makes a Good Research Paper Topic?

Not all research paper topics are created equal, and you want to make sure you choose a great topic before you start writing. Below are the three most important factors to consider to make sure you choose the best research paper topics.

#1: It's Something You're Interested In

A paper is always easier to write if you're interested in the topic, and you'll be more motivated to do in-depth research and write a paper that really covers the entire subject. Even if a certain research paper topic is getting a lot of buzz right now or other people seem interested in writing about it, don't feel tempted to make it your topic unless you genuinely have some sort of interest in it as well.

#2: There's Enough Information to Write a Paper

Even if you come up with the absolute best research paper topic and you're so excited to write about it, you won't be able to produce a good paper if there isn't enough research about the topic. This can happen for very specific or specialized topics, as well as topics that are too new to have enough research done on them at the moment. Easy research paper topics will always be topics with enough information to write a full-length paper.

Trying to write a research paper on a topic that doesn't have much research on it is incredibly hard, so before you decide on a topic, do a bit of preliminary searching and make sure you'll have all the information you need to write your paper.

#3: It Fits Your Teacher's Guidelines

Don't get so carried away looking at lists of research paper topics that you forget any requirements or restrictions your teacher may have put on research topic ideas. If you're writing a research paper on a health-related topic, deciding to write about the impact of rap on the music scene probably won't be allowed, but there may be some sort of leeway. For example, if you're really interested in current events but your teacher wants you to write a research paper on a history topic, you may be able to choose a topic that fits both categories, like exploring the relationship between the US and North Korea. No matter what, always get your research paper topic approved by your teacher first before you begin writing.

113 Good Research Paper Topics

Below are 113 good research topics to help you get you started on your paper. We've organized them into ten categories to make it easier to find the type of research paper topics you're looking for.

Arts/Culture

  • Discuss the main differences in art from the Italian Renaissance and the Northern Renaissance .
  • Analyze the impact a famous artist had on the world.
  • How is sexism portrayed in different types of media (music, film, video games, etc.)? Has the amount/type of sexism changed over the years?
  • How has the music of slaves brought over from Africa shaped modern American music?
  • How has rap music evolved in the past decade?
  • How has the portrayal of minorities in the media changed?

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Current Events

  • What have been the impacts of China's one child policy?
  • How have the goals of feminists changed over the decades?
  • How has the Trump presidency changed international relations?
  • Analyze the history of the relationship between the United States and North Korea.
  • What factors contributed to the current decline in the rate of unemployment?
  • What have been the impacts of states which have increased their minimum wage?
  • How do US immigration laws compare to immigration laws of other countries?
  • How have the US's immigration laws changed in the past few years/decades?
  • How has the Black Lives Matter movement affected discussions and view about racism in the US?
  • What impact has the Affordable Care Act had on healthcare in the US?
  • What factors contributed to the UK deciding to leave the EU (Brexit)?
  • What factors contributed to China becoming an economic power?
  • Discuss the history of Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies  (some of which tokenize the S&P 500 Index on the blockchain) .
  • Do students in schools that eliminate grades do better in college and their careers?
  • Do students from wealthier backgrounds score higher on standardized tests?
  • Do students who receive free meals at school get higher grades compared to when they weren't receiving a free meal?
  • Do students who attend charter schools score higher on standardized tests than students in public schools?
  • Do students learn better in same-sex classrooms?
  • How does giving each student access to an iPad or laptop affect their studies?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of the Montessori Method ?
  • Do children who attend preschool do better in school later on?
  • What was the impact of the No Child Left Behind act?
  • How does the US education system compare to education systems in other countries?
  • What impact does mandatory physical education classes have on students' health?
  • Which methods are most effective at reducing bullying in schools?
  • Do homeschoolers who attend college do as well as students who attended traditional schools?
  • Does offering tenure increase or decrease quality of teaching?
  • How does college debt affect future life choices of students?
  • Should graduate students be able to form unions?

body_highschoolsc

  • What are different ways to lower gun-related deaths in the US?
  • How and why have divorce rates changed over time?
  • Is affirmative action still necessary in education and/or the workplace?
  • Should physician-assisted suicide be legal?
  • How has stem cell research impacted the medical field?
  • How can human trafficking be reduced in the United States/world?
  • Should people be able to donate organs in exchange for money?
  • Which types of juvenile punishment have proven most effective at preventing future crimes?
  • Has the increase in US airport security made passengers safer?
  • Analyze the immigration policies of certain countries and how they are similar and different from one another.
  • Several states have legalized recreational marijuana. What positive and negative impacts have they experienced as a result?
  • Do tariffs increase the number of domestic jobs?
  • Which prison reforms have proven most effective?
  • Should governments be able to censor certain information on the internet?
  • Which methods/programs have been most effective at reducing teen pregnancy?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of the Keto diet?
  • How effective are different exercise regimes for losing weight and maintaining weight loss?
  • How do the healthcare plans of various countries differ from each other?
  • What are the most effective ways to treat depression ?
  • What are the pros and cons of genetically modified foods?
  • Which methods are most effective for improving memory?
  • What can be done to lower healthcare costs in the US?
  • What factors contributed to the current opioid crisis?
  • Analyze the history and impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic .
  • Are low-carbohydrate or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • How much exercise should the average adult be getting each week?
  • Which methods are most effective to get parents to vaccinate their children?
  • What are the pros and cons of clean needle programs?
  • How does stress affect the body?
  • Discuss the history of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.
  • What were the causes and effects of the Salem Witch Trials?
  • Who was responsible for the Iran-Contra situation?
  • How has New Orleans and the government's response to natural disasters changed since Hurricane Katrina?
  • What events led to the fall of the Roman Empire?
  • What were the impacts of British rule in India ?
  • Was the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki necessary?
  • What were the successes and failures of the women's suffrage movement in the United States?
  • What were the causes of the Civil War?
  • How did Abraham Lincoln's assassination impact the country and reconstruction after the Civil War?
  • Which factors contributed to the colonies winning the American Revolution?
  • What caused Hitler's rise to power?
  • Discuss how a specific invention impacted history.
  • What led to Cleopatra's fall as ruler of Egypt?
  • How has Japan changed and evolved over the centuries?
  • What were the causes of the Rwandan genocide ?

main_lincoln

  • Why did Martin Luther decide to split with the Catholic Church?
  • Analyze the history and impact of a well-known cult (Jonestown, Manson family, etc.)
  • How did the sexual abuse scandal impact how people view the Catholic Church?
  • How has the Catholic church's power changed over the past decades/centuries?
  • What are the causes behind the rise in atheism/ agnosticism in the United States?
  • What were the influences in Siddhartha's life resulted in him becoming the Buddha?
  • How has media portrayal of Islam/Muslims changed since September 11th?

Science/Environment

  • How has the earth's climate changed in the past few decades?
  • How has the use and elimination of DDT affected bird populations in the US?
  • Analyze how the number and severity of natural disasters have increased in the past few decades.
  • Analyze deforestation rates in a certain area or globally over a period of time.
  • How have past oil spills changed regulations and cleanup methods?
  • How has the Flint water crisis changed water regulation safety?
  • What are the pros and cons of fracking?
  • What impact has the Paris Climate Agreement had so far?
  • What have NASA's biggest successes and failures been?
  • How can we improve access to clean water around the world?
  • Does ecotourism actually have a positive impact on the environment?
  • Should the US rely on nuclear energy more?
  • What can be done to save amphibian species currently at risk of extinction?
  • What impact has climate change had on coral reefs?
  • How are black holes created?
  • Are teens who spend more time on social media more likely to suffer anxiety and/or depression?
  • How will the loss of net neutrality affect internet users?
  • Analyze the history and progress of self-driving vehicles.
  • How has the use of drones changed surveillance and warfare methods?
  • Has social media made people more or less connected?
  • What progress has currently been made with artificial intelligence ?
  • Do smartphones increase or decrease workplace productivity?
  • What are the most effective ways to use technology in the classroom?
  • How is Google search affecting our intelligence?
  • When is the best age for a child to begin owning a smartphone?
  • Has frequent texting reduced teen literacy rates?

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How to Write a Great Research Paper

Even great research paper topics won't give you a great research paper if you don't hone your topic before and during the writing process. Follow these three tips to turn good research paper topics into great papers.

#1: Figure Out Your Thesis Early

Before you start writing a single word of your paper, you first need to know what your thesis will be. Your thesis is a statement that explains what you intend to prove/show in your paper. Every sentence in your research paper will relate back to your thesis, so you don't want to start writing without it!

As some examples, if you're writing a research paper on if students learn better in same-sex classrooms, your thesis might be "Research has shown that elementary-age students in same-sex classrooms score higher on standardized tests and report feeling more comfortable in the classroom."

If you're writing a paper on the causes of the Civil War, your thesis might be "While the dispute between the North and South over slavery is the most well-known cause of the Civil War, other key causes include differences in the economies of the North and South, states' rights, and territorial expansion."

#2: Back Every Statement Up With Research

Remember, this is a research paper you're writing, so you'll need to use lots of research to make your points. Every statement you give must be backed up with research, properly cited the way your teacher requested. You're allowed to include opinions of your own, but they must also be supported by the research you give.

#3: Do Your Research Before You Begin Writing

You don't want to start writing your research paper and then learn that there isn't enough research to back up the points you're making, or, even worse, that the research contradicts the points you're trying to make!

Get most of your research on your good research topics done before you begin writing. Then use the research you've collected to create a rough outline of what your paper will cover and the key points you're going to make. This will help keep your paper clear and organized, and it'll ensure you have enough research to produce a strong paper.

What's Next?

Are you also learning about dynamic equilibrium in your science class? We break this sometimes tricky concept down so it's easy to understand in our complete guide to dynamic equilibrium .

Thinking about becoming a nurse practitioner? Nurse practitioners have one of the fastest growing careers in the country, and we have all the information you need to know about what to expect from nurse practitioner school .

Want to know the fastest and easiest ways to convert between Fahrenheit and Celsius? We've got you covered! Check out our guide to the best ways to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit (or vice versa).

These recommendations are based solely on our knowledge and experience. If you purchase an item through one of our links, PrepScholar may receive a commission.

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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Research Basics for Junior and Senior High School Students: Getting Started - Essay Type & Topic

  • Getting Started - Essay Type & Topic
  • Find & Evaluate Sources
  • Write & Edit Your Paper
  • Presenting your research

Types of Essays

research topics for junior high school students

Narrat ive Essays: Telling a Story  In a  narrative essay , the writer tells a story about a real-life experience. When writing a narrative essay, writers should try to involve the reader by making the story as vivid as possible.

Descriptive Essays: Painting a Picture  A  descriptive essay  paints a picture with words. A writer might describe a person, p lace, object, or even memory of special significance. The descriptive essay strives to communicate a deeper meaning through the description. 

Expository Essays: Just the Facts  The  expository essay  is an informative piece of writing that presents a balanced analysis of a topic. In an expository essay, the writer explains or defines a topic, using facts, statistics, and examples. 

Persuasive Essays: Convince Me  While like an expository essay in its presentation of facts, the goal of the  persuasive essay  is to convince the reader to accept the writer’s point of view or recommendation. The writer must build a case using facts and logic, as well as examples, expert opinion, and sound reasoning. 

Source: Time4Writing.com,  Types of Essays: End the Confusion .   https://www.time4writing.com/writing-resources/types-of-essays/  

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The Research Process

research topics for junior high school students

Chosing your topic is research

Step One: Choose a topic 

1) Choose a topic of interest as you will be spending a lot of time with it

2) Test your topic against the research: is the topic to broad (overwhelming information) or to narrow (not enough information)

3) Tweek your topic (broaden or narrow as needed)

Before choosing a topic, watch - Picking your topic is research NCSU Libraries 

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62 Best Research Opportunities for High School Students

June 2, 2024

Hands-on laboratory-based research experiences are coveted by just about every STEM-oriented teenager on the planet. Of course, this level of demand renders research opportunities for high school students a valuable and rare commodity. Fortunately, there are a number of reputable summer programs run by universities, government agencies, and private research laboratories that afford young scientists this highly sought-after experience. Research opportunities during the actual school year are more challenging to locate as colleges are, at that time, catering to their own students, and the rigidity of the high school calendar makes participation a further challenge.

What type of research opportunities can a high school student have, anyway?

Research opportunities for high school students can range from introductory to highly advanced. Some programs focus on teaching students the fundamental skills required for research while others place students with a real working research group and allow them to contribute to legitimate experiments and papers. Your level of involvement will depend on the university or organization’s policies, your mentor, your lab team, and the type of research being conducted.

What types of research experiences look best on college applications?

Authentic, laboratory-based research experiences that you get paid for are the hardest types of positions to nail down, primarily because very few of these spots are available. Moreover, such research groups are conducting serious work—consequently, they’re looking for serious, high-achieving students who will positively enhance their dynamic. Additionally, these positions typically require a longer time commitment, with students working full-time (or close to full-time) hours for several months or even years. As such, accepting one of these positions may limit the other types of summer opportunities that you can participate in. Finally, due to safety concerns and restrictions, you will likely need to be at least 16 years old to participate in many types of lab-based research.

On the flip side are research opportunities that you pay to be involved in, with some being more selective than others. Many families wonder if these programs offer legitimate research experience or are simply another way to capitalize off of the college admissions craze, and the answer is that you have to do your homework.

Although some research opportunities offer little in the way of experience, others are truly authentic opportunities to work with a mentor and delve into an area of interest for academic enrichment—no different than any other cost-based summer program. In these cases, the fact that a student prioritized their intellectual curiosity and spent several months seriously pursuing a topic of interest will be an excellent addition to their application. We’ve gone ahead and done the hard work for you—any one of the opportunities listed below is legitimate and worthy of investing your time and resources into.

How do I decide what types of research opportunities to apply for?

If conducting research is important to you, we recommend applying to a mix of highly selective and lesser selective programs to maximize your chances of being accepted to at least one. Beyond selectivity, it’s important to consider additional several factors:

  • Time commitment —Some programs may require a multi-week, full-time commitment over the summer. Others may require nights and weekends during the school year.
  • Time frame —Some programs are only available in the summer while others run year-round (sometimes for multiple years).
  • Cost/stipend —Do you have to pay for the program, or does the program pay you? Research whether the program will be a good fit for your financial situation, including how much it costs and if you’ll receive compensation for your work, either via academic credit or a paycheck. Note that many residential programs are cost-based while commuter programs that only accept local students are more likely to be fully funded and/or offer a stipend.
  • Location —Evaluate whether you’d like to attend a local program, are willing to travel to a residential program, or would prefer a virtual option.
  • Level of mentor interaction —During some programs, you’ll be closely supported by PhD faculty members, while others may be run by graduate or postdoc students and require students to be more independent.
  • Opportunity to publish or enter research competitions —If publishing research or submitting your project/paper to a research competition is important to you, you’ll want to look into whether the program prepares you for that venture.

Our list includes a bevy of summer program choices as well as year-long internships and apprenticeships. We’ve divided the list into three sections: Virtual, Residential/Multi-Location, and Location-Specific.

For each entry, we list the geographic location of the program, the time frame and length of the program, any associated costs or stipends, and the eligibility criteria for participation.

Virtual Research Opportunities for High School Students

Virtual research opportunities for high school students offer ultimate flexibility, in regard to time commitment as well as subject matter.

1) Polygence

  • Location : Virtual
  • Timeframe : Academic year and/or summer
  • Length: 2-6 months
  • Cost : $495-$3,695
  • Eligibility: No age restrictions

For high school students who want to showcase authentic passion on their college applications, Polygence offers the most personalized and flexible online research program that helps students turn their interests into unique research projects. Accordingly, they pair intellectually curious students with PhD-level mentors to design experiments, build robots, create podcasts, write original screenplays, and publish in peer-reviewed journals in all fields from the humanities to STEM. All 1:1 programs include ten meetings with a mentor in your chosen field as well as a self-selected project topic and outcome, which could include a research paper, a prototype, or a creative piece of work.

A multitude of personalized options are available, including additional brainstorming sessions, time with a specialist who will guide the student through the publishing or research competition process, and academic credit through UCI x GATI. Moreover, Polygence’s Pods program allows students to work with like-minded peers in a group setting.

Sound like a good fit? College Transitions readers can save $50 on their Polygence package.

Research areas available include:

  • Computer science, engineering, AI, & game design
  • Biology, biotech, chemistry, neuroscience, and physics
  • Medicine, surgery, dentistry, and public health
  • Business, finance, and economics
  • Math, statistics, sports analytics, and quantitative analysis
  • Psychology, psychiatry, cognitive science, and social sciences
  • Creative writing, history, philosophy, and literature
  • Animation, the arts, fashion, photography, and dance

Residential/Multi-Location Research Programs

In the following section, we’ve outlined programs that are residential or offer opportunities in multiple locations, making them more accessible to a wider array of students.

Programs are organized alphabetically by discipline.

Biology Research Opportunities for High School Students

2) university of chicago research in the biological sciences (ribs).

  • Location : Chicago, IL
  • Timeframe : Summer
  • Length: 4 weeks
  • Cost : $14,000
  • Eligibility: Current sophomores and juniors

In UChicago’s highly selective RIBS program, students practice a range of molecular, microbiological, and cell biological research techniques. The goal? To prepare them to work in a research laboratory. Accordingly, for the first two weeks, students undergo basic training in lab skills and techniques. Then, they spend the final two weeks of the course immersed in an independent research project. At the end of the course, they present the project during a research forum. Moreover, students can expect weekly writing assignments and seminars. To be competitive, students should have a demonstrated interest in science as well as top grades in those classes.

Biomedical Research Programs for High School Students

3) rosetta institute of biomedical research molecular medicine workshops.

  • Location : Berkeley; San Diego; Columbia; London; virtual
  • Length: 2 weeks
  • Cost : $3,580-$4,180 (residential); $2,280-$2,480 (commuter); $430-1,050 (online)
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 14-18

Curious about biomedical research but not ready to pursue a full-blown lab internship? Rosetta Institute offers a number of residential and online two-week programs that introduce high schoolers to topics in medicine, drug development, pharmacy, and nursing. For example, current workshops include Medicinal Chemistry, Neurological Bioinformatics, and Molecular Biology of Cancer. All students are taught by PhD-level instructors and complete an original research project.

Chemistry Research Opportunities for High School Students

4) american chemical society — project seed.

  • Location : Multiple
  • Length: 8-10 weeks
  • Cost : Free, and students receive a $4,000 stipend
  • Eligibility: All high school students whose families meet annual income requirements, but preferably current sophomores, juniors, or seniors

Having been operational for more than fifty years, Project SEED (Summer Experiences for the Economically Disadvantaged) runs programs at over 350 institutions and has served over 12,000 students. The goal of the program is to empower a diverse cohort of high school students to conduct hands-on research experience in the chemical sciences. Accordingly, all students work full-time on meaningful independent or small group projects, are closely guided by a mentor, and either write a report or do a poster presentation at the end of their fellowship.

Genetics Research Opportunities for High School Students

5) jackson lab summer student program.

  • Location : Bar Harbor, ME or Farmington, CT
  • Length: 10 weeks
  • Cost : Free, and students receive a $6,500 stipend plus funded room, board, and travel
  • Eligibility: High school seniors can apply to the Bar Harbor program, while eligible undergrads can apply to either program.

Hoping to design and execute an original independent research project? You’ll be able to do just that through Jackson Lab’s Summer Student Program, which immerses students in one of seven areas: bioinformatics and computational biology, cancer, developmental biology and aging, genomics, immunology and infectious disease, metabolic diseases, and neurobiology and sensory deficits. Moreover, students are closely guided by a mentor and present their research at the end of the summer. Finally, the application process is intense and competitive, requiring two letters of recommendation, a transcript, a resume, evidence of a strong interest in genetics and genomics, and four essay responses.

Pre-Health Research Opportunities for High School Students

6) national institutes of health high school summer internship program.

  • Location : Research groups are available at many of NIH’s 27 institutes and centers , including the main campus in Bethesda, MD
  • Cost : Free; all students receive a stipend
  • Eligibility: High school seniors age 17+

Through their HS-SIP Program, the National Institutes of Health places high school students in full-time research positions within their many active research groups. Subject areas include biomedical, behavioral, and social sciences, and are geared toward students who are interested in pursuing research and healthcare. Moreover, students can take part in Summer Poster Day, where they present their research to the NIH community. They also have access to professional development programs and educational/career advising.

Note that this research opportunity for high school students is extremely competitive; approximately 7% of applicants are ultimately accepted. Finally, if you are under the age of 18 when you participate in the program, you will need to live within 40 miles of the campus that you’d like to intern at.

STEM/Humanities Research Opportunities for High School Students

7) army educational outreach program—high school internships.

  • Location : Various
  • Timeframe : All Year
  • Length: 3 months
  • Cost : Free, and all interns receive a stipend
  • Eligibility: All current high school students. Some sites may have additional eligibility requirements.

With programs currently available in twenty states, the Army Educational Outreach Program places high school students in university research labs or at a US Army Research Laboratory/Center. Each site has its own technical focus, from biology and materials science to cybersecurity and AI. Regardless of specialty, all interns receive formal mentorship from a professional scientist or engineer, have access to high-tech equipment, and work on relevant research that addresses a current major challenge.

8) Boston University RISE

  • Location : Boston, MA
  • Length: 6 weeks
  • Cost : $5,350 plus room & board
  • Eligibility: Current high school juniors

A residential program located on the Boston University campus, RISE offers high school students the opportunity to conduct laboratory research in one of two tracks: Internship or Practicum. Students in the Internship track work full-time on a research project that aligns with their interests, and are mentored by a faculty member, postdoc fellow, or grad student. 15 subject areas are available, including astronomy, mechanical engineering, medical laboratory research, and nutrition. Alternatively, Practicum students work in small groups on structured research related to systems neuroscience and neurobiology.

Research Opportunities for High School Students—Continued

9) michigan state high school honors science, math and engineering program.

  • Location : East Lansing, MI
  • Length: 7 weeks
  • Cost : $4,000

HSHSP is a highly selective, residential program where students can pursue research opportunities in science, engineering, and mathematics. After learning more about the research process, students deeply explore a problem of interest while engaging in an authentic (not “fail-proof”) research experience. Along the way, they’ll work with professionals and peers in their field of interest. Finally, many students have gone on to publish their work or be recognized at prestigious research competitions.

10) MIT Research Science Institute

  • Location : Cambridge, MA
  • Cost : Free
  • Eligibility: High school juniors

With a combined focus on academic coursework and hands-on research, RSI students first take one week of STEM coursework with MIT professors. Here, they’ll learn about current research topics in biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, physics, and the humanities. Then, for the remaining five weeks, students “experience the entire research cycle start to finish.” During this time, they participate in an intensive, mentored individual project experience that culminates in a written and oral presentation.

The program looks for students who are exceptionally academically talented. As such, the application process is quite intensive. PSAT Math scores must be over 740 and ACT Math scores must be over 33. In addition, students must write several essays, acquire teacher recommendations, and provide transcripts. Ultimately, only 100 students are accepted.

11) NASA Internship Programs

  • Location : Various; there are 15 centers and facilities in the US. Remote opportunities may also be available.
  • Timeframe : Available during the fall, spring, and summer
  • Length: 10-16 weeks, depending on session
  • Cost : Free; the majority of interns receive a stipend, but some are unpaid
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 16+

NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement (OSTEM) offers a number of internship opportunities for high school students. Available projects change each year and are location-specific, and not every NASA center will offer internship opportunities every session. That said, current projects span a range of subject areas, including Climate Change in the Hudson Estuary and Characterizing the Urban Land Surface Temperature. During the research internship, students will be closely mentored by a research scientist, engineer, or other professional. Note that you will need to make your own housing arrangements if you are not a local student.

Are you an undergraduate student? Check out NASA Pathways , which can provide a direct transition into full-time employment at NASA.

12) Smith College Summer Science and Engineering Program

  • Location : Northampton, MA
  • Length: 2-4 weeks
  • Cost : $4,745 (2 weeks); $8,082 (4 weeks)
  • Eligibility: Female high school students in grades 9-12; some programs have specific prerequisites

Fun fact: Smith was the first women’s college to create a program in engineering science. As such, their summer programs are an excellent place for young women to participate in hands-on, introductory research experiences. Two-week sessions are offered, and students can take one or both. Each session offers six distinct course choices. For example, the first session offers Chemistry of Herbal Medicine, Designing Intelligent Robots, and Novel Bacteriophage Discovery. Second session courses include Where the Body Meets the Mind, Supercontinents, Rocks, and Fossils, and the Art and Science of Microcontrollers. Students spend five days a week in class, attending lectures and conducting experiments & fieldwork. Additionally, the program is team-based, allowing students to learn from each other’s ideas and perspectives.

13) Stony Brook University Garcia Center Research Experience for High School Students

  • Location : Stony Brook, NY
  • Timeframe : Summer (with possible academic year continuation)
  • Cost : $4,000 plus room & board

At the Garcia Center for Polymers at Engineered Interfaces, high school students can design an original research project in polymer science and technology during an intensive seven-week summer program. Uniquely, the research can then be continued during the academic year under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Students should be highly motivated and high-achieving, with at least three upper-level science courses under their belt. Finally, past participants have regularly published their research and won recognition in national competitions.

14) Stony Brook University Simons Summer Research Program

  • Cost : Students need to cover transportation costs (if commuting) or room/board (if residential). Room/board is $2,781. Stipends are also awarded at the end of the program.

After being matched with a mentor and research team, students are fully immersed in the research process. Placement availability varies from year to year, but typically about thirty projects are available across over a dozen disciplines. These include biochemistry, computer science, geosciences, and pharmacological sciences, among others. Moreover, some have prerequisites, such as specific AP courses or previous programming experience.

All students participate in weekly faculty research talks, workshops, events, and a culminating poster symposium.

15) Summer Science Program

  • Location : Astrophysics: UNC Chapel Hill, University of Colorado, Georgia College & State University, New Mexico State University; Biochemistry: Purdue, Indiana University; Genomics: Georgetown, Purdue, New Mexico State; Synthetic Chemistry : Southwestern Oklahoma State University
  • Cost : $8,800 max; all program fees are scaled according to what each family can afford
  • Eligibility: Current high school juniors and exceptional sophomores

The Summer Science Program offers four different immersive research programs that take place on different college campuses around the country. These include programs in astrophysics, biochemistry, genomics, and synthetic chemistry. Each program has its own research focus. For example, astrophysics students will dive into Asteroid Orbit Determination while genomics students explore Antibiotic Resistance and Directed Evolution.

Students spend six days a week in class deeply investigating their research topics and learning more about general experimental science. They also take part in guest lectures and other special programming.

16) Texas Tech University Anson L. Clark Scholars Program

  • Location : Lubbock, TX
  • Cost : Free; all students receive a $750 stipend upon completion of their projects
  • Eligibility: High school juniors and seniors aged 17+ by the start of the program

The Clark Scholars Program is one of the only programs on this list with research disciplines in the sciences as well as the humanities. For example, current research areas include everything from nutritional sciences and mechanical engineering to history. Over the course of seven weeks, students work closely with a faculty member to complete a research paper in their discipline. They also participate in weekly seminars, discussions, and field trips.

17) University of California Santa Barbara Research Mentorship Program

  • Location : Santa Barbara, CA
  • Cost : $11,874 (residential); $4,975 (commuter)
  • Eligibility: High school sophomores and juniors

During this intensive program, students work 35-50 hours per week on an interdisciplinary research project of their choice. Nearly thirty research areas are available in both the STEM disciplines and humanities; current topics include biochemistry, computer science, history, music, and anthropology, among others. Over the course of the program, they also take two courses: Introduction to Research and Presentation Techniques. Finally, students occasionally continue their research remotely during the academic year, depending on their mentor’s availability.

18) University of California Santa Barbara Summer Research Academies

  • Cost : $8,224 (residential); $2,575 (commuter)
  • Eligibility: High school sophomores, juniors, and seniors

Running for four weeks, the UCSB Summer Research Academies allow students to earn up to four credits. While taking a university-level course that teaches fundamental research concepts, students spend the first two weeks of the program developing a research question & framework via hands-on labs. They’ll then spend the final two weeks of the course analyzing their results and building presentations. Overall, they’ll spend about 25-40 hours per week working. Finally, twelve different tracks are available; each involves multiple disciplines. For example, “Bionic Creatures” combines mechanical engineering, materials science, soft robotics, biomanufacturing, and collective motion.

19) University of California Santa Cruz Science Internship Program (SIP)

  • Location : Santa Cruz, CA
  • Length: 9 weeks (two weeks virtual, seven weeks in-person)
  • Cost : $4,750 plus room & board
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 14+, although some research groups require students to be 16+

UCSC’s SIP Program offers a wide range of research focus areas, including science and engineering as well as social science, humanities, and art. For example, over 100 projects are currently offered that include everything from “Eating Insects in Silicon Valley: Cultural Gaps Between Food-Tech and Tradition” and “Future Projected Changes in the Distribution and Variability of Ocean Chlorophyll in Climate Simulations.” Before you dive in, you’ll spend two weeks doing online research prep (this part is conducted remotely) followed by seven weeks of in-person, mentored research. Students get to engage in authentic, open-ended projects that fully immerse them in the academic research experience. Moreover, they’ll present their findings at a symposium at the end of the program.

20) University of California Davis Young Scholars Program

  • Location : Davis, CA
  • Cost : $6,750
  • Eligibility: High school sophomores and juniors who will be 16+ by the start of the program

Interested in biological, agricultural, environmental, or natural sciences? If so, UC Davis is a stellar place to explore those interests through research. All students have the opportunity to work on independent, original projects while receiving one-on-one faculty mentorship. Moreover, they each produce a journal-quality paper and symposium presentation. In addition to research, students also participate in a lecture series presented by UC Davis faculty; past topics have included forensic entomology and nutrition, among others. Finally, field trips to educational facilities like the Monterey Bay Aquarium and Bodega Bay Marine Laboratory round out the experience.

21) University of Florida Student Science Training Program

  • Location : Gainesville, FL
  • Cost : $5,200
  • Eligibility: Rising seniors aged 16+

Thinking about a career in science, medicine, math, computer science, or engineering? UF’s Student Science Training Program could be the right fit. For thirty hours per week, you’ll work with a faculty mentor and lab team on university-level, ongoing research. Moreover, you’ll participate in a science lecture series as well as a UF Honors Program seminar class. Over the course of the program, you will write a research paper, present a poster, and give two oral presentations. Finally, social programming is included.

22) University of Iowa Secondary Student Training Program

  • Location : Iowa City, IA
  • Cost : $7,500

During this intensive and competitive program, students conduct research within small groups that are supported by a University of Iowa faculty member. There are twenty current active research areas, including chemistry, geography, neurology, orthopedics & rehabilitation, and religious studies. You’ll be working on your project approximately seven hours per day, attending classes in the evenings, and participating in structured activities on the weekend. Moreover, all groups will create and present a poster at the culmination of the program.

23) University of Massachusetts Amherst Summer Programs

  • Location : Amherst, MA
  • Cost : $3,636 (residential); $2,167 (commuter)
  • Eligibility: Rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors

UMass Amherst offers two introductory, research-focused opportunities for high school students. These are Antibiotic Resistance: A Global Health Crisis, which allows students to join the Department of Microbiology in researching new antibiotics, and Energy Without Borders, which delves into climate change, infrastructure, and green energy. In both courses, you’ll learn research methods, complete multiple lab experiences, and present a research poster. Finally, students can earn two college credits upon successful completion of the program.

Location-Specific Research Opportunities for High School Students

The following programs are not residential and only offered in a specific location. Many also only accept local students, although some do allow out-of-state students to apply. If that’s the case, you will need to secure your own living accommodations and transportation. Moreover, if you are under the age of 18, you will need to be supervised by a parent or guardian.

Programs are organized alphabetically by state.

24) California Academy of the Sciences—Careers in Science Intern

  • Location : San Francisco, CA
  • Focus: STEM
  • Length: Multi-year (2-3 years)
  • Eligibility: 9 th or 10 th grade student enrolled in an SFUSD school with a GPA of 2.5 or higher

25) Cedars Sinai INSPIRE High School

  • Location : Los Angeles, CA
  • Focus: Pre-Health
  • Cost : Free; all students are paid
  • Eligibility: High school students age 16+

26) City of Hope Summer Student Academy

  • Location : Duarte, CA
  • Focus: Biomedicine
  • Cost : Free; all students receive a stipend of $4,000

27) Sandia National Laboratories—Internships

  • Location : Livermore, CA
  • Focus : STEM
  • Timeframe : Academic year and summer internships available
  • Length: Academic year or 10-12 weeks (summer)
  • Cost : Free; all positions are paid

28) Scripps Student Research Internship Program

  • Location : La Jolla, CA
  • Focus : Translational science/genomics
  • Cost : Free; stipends are typically offered

29) UCSF SEP High School Intern Program

  • Focus : Biomedical research
  • Length: 8 weeks
  • Eligibility: High school juniors enrolled in an SFUSD high school, SF charter school, or College Track San Francisco

30) UCSF Summer Student Research Program

  • Location : Oakland, CA
  • Length: 9 weeks
  • Cost : Free; all students are given a stipend between $3,000-$4,300
  • Eligibility: High school juniors or seniors, aged 16+

Connecticut

31) jackson lab academic year fellowships.

  • Location : Farmington, CT*
  • Focus: Genetics
  • Timeframe : Academic year
  • Length: 1 school year
  • Cost : Free; students must be able to receive academic credit for their work
  • Eligibility: High school juniors and seniors age 16+ within commuting distance of the lab

*Some fully remote opportunities are available

32) Yale School of Medicine Discovery to Cure High School Internship

  • Location : New Haven, CT

33) Yale University Social Robotics Lab High School Internship

  • Focus: Robotics and human social behavior
  • Eligibility: Rising juniors and seniors aged 16+

34) Argonne National Laboratory — Exemplary Student Research Program

  • Location : Lemont, IL
  • Focus: Engineering
  • Eligibility: Application must be completed by participating teacher

35) Chicago EYES on Cancer

  • Focus : Biomedicine
  • Timeframe : All year, with two 8-week summer research experiences
  • Length: 2 years
  • Cost : Free; all students receive $3,100 stipend
  • Eligibility: High school sophomore, junior, or senior aged 16+

36) University of Kansas Biotech Research Apprentice Program

  • Location : Overland Park, KS
  • Focus : Biotech
  • Length: Semester

37) Jackson Lab Academic Year Fellowships

  • Location : Bar Harbor, ME*

38) National Cancer Institute Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program

  • Location : Frederick, MD
  • Timeframe : Academic year & summer
  • Length: 1 year
  • Cost : Free; academic credit available during school year, stipend provided in summer
  • Eligibility: High school junior age 17+ who attends an eligible school located within a 30-mile radius of campus

39) University of Minnesota Lillehei Heart Institute Summer Research Scholars Program

  • Location : Minneapolis, MN
  • Focus: Cardiovascular medicine
  • Eligibility: High school juniors and seniors age 16+ as well as undergraduate students

40) Coriell Institute for Medical Research

  • Location : Camden, NJ
  • Eligibility: High school student aged 17+

41) Princeton Laboratory Learning Program

  • Location : Princeton, NJ
  • Focus : Natural Sciences or Engineering
  • Length: 5-6 weeks

42) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory High School Internship

  • Location : Princeton, NJ*
  • Focus : Physics
  • Eligibility: High school seniors (program takes place summer after graduation)

*Remote projects may be available.

43) Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science Summer Research Program (RITMS)

  • Location : Rutgers, NJ
  • Focus : Translational medicine/science

44) Rutgers Waksman Institute Summer Experience Program

  • Location : Piscataway, NJ*
  • Focus : Molecular biology/bioinformatics
  • Cost : $2,000
  • Eligibility: High school students who have completed a high school-level biology course

*Online version of the program is also available

45) Los Alamos National Laboratory High School Internship Program

  • Location : Los Alamos, NM
  • Length: 11 weeks
  • Eligibility: New Mexico high school seniors aged 16+

46) Sandia National Laboratories—Internships

  • Location : Albuquerque, NM

47) Baruch College STEM Research Academy

  • Location : New York, NY
  • Timeframe : Spring/summer
  • Cost : Free, but all students receive a stipend of $1,575
  • Eligibility: Must be a NYC public high school sophomore junior to apply

48) Burke Neurological Institute NeuroAcademy

  • Location : White Plains, NY
  • Focus: Neuroscience
  • Eligibility: Completion of NYS Regents Living Environment or equivalent Biology class; cumulative GPA of 3.4 or higher

49) City Tech College STEM Research Academy

  • Length: Two semesters (January-August)
  • Eligibility: NYC public school sophomore or junior

50) Columbia Zuckerman Institute—BRAINYAC Program

  • Eligibility: High school sophomores and juniors from select partner programs/schools in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx

51) HOPP Summer Student Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

  • Focus: Biomedical or computational research
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 14+

52) University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Summer High School Research Program

  • Location : Rochester, NY
  • Focus: Laser energetics
  • Eligibility: Rochester-area high school students who have completed their junior year

53) Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute

  • Location : Cleveland, OH
  • Timeframe : Varies; depends on lab
  • Length: Varies; depends on lab

54) OHSU School of Medicine Partnership for Scientific Inquiry (PSI)

  • Location : Portland, OR
  • Focus: Biomedical research
  • Timeframe : Academic semester + summer
  • Length: 16+ weeks
  • Eligibility: Oregon-based high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors aged 16+

Pennsylvania

55) fox chase cancer center high school research programs.

  • Location : Philadelphia, PA
  • Timeframe : During school year
  • Length: 2-3 months; depends on program
  • Eligibility: Philadelphia-area high school students; students must be 16+ for some programs

56) Penn State College of Medicine Research Internships

  • Location : Hershey, PA
  • Length: Varies; could be weeks to months depending on lab
  • Cost : Paid and unpaid internships available

57) University of Pennsylvania GRASP Lab High School Internships

  • Focus: Robotics
  • Cost : Free; stipend typically available
  • Eligibility: Rising high school senior

58) George Mason University Aspiring Scientists Internship Program (ASSIP)

  • Location : Fairfax, VA*
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 15+ or 16+, depending on program

*Some fully remote and hybrid opportunities are available, depending on the lab.

59) Jefferson Lab High School Summer Honors Program

  • Location : Newport News, VA
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 16+ who live within 60 miles of the lab

60) Virginia Tech Fralin Biomedical Research Institute Summer Research Program

  • Location : Roanoke, VA
  • Focus: Health behaviors research
  • Cost : Free; all students receive a stipend of $4,800
  • Eligibility: Rising high school junior or senior in the Roanoke Valley

61) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory High School Research Programs

  • Location : Richland, WA
  • Timeframe : Summer & academic year programs available
  • Length: Academic year or 10 weeks (summer)
  • Eligibility: High school students aged 16+; some labs may require students to be 18+

62) Seattle Children’s Hospital Research Training Program

  • Location : Seattle, WA
  • Eligibility: High school sophomores, juniors, or seniors within commuting distance of downtown Seattle

Final Thoughts—Research Opportunities for High School Students

If gaining research experience is important to you, it’s in your best interest to explore a number of different programs, evaluating whether their structure, length, cost, and outcomes are in line with your goals. Finding the right opportunity may take some time, but it will be well worth the effort required.

  • Research Programs

Kelsea Conlin

Kelsea holds a BA in English with a concentration in Creative Writing from Tufts University, a graduate certificate in College Counseling from UCLA, and an MA in Teaching Writing from Johns Hopkins University. Her short fiction is forthcoming in Chautauqua .

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The Big List of Essay Topics for High School (120+ Ideas!)

Ideas to inspire every young writer!

What one class should all high schools students be required to take and pass in order to graduate?

High school students generally do a lot of writing, learning to use language clearly, concisely, and persuasively. When it’s time to choose an essay topic, though, it’s easy to come up blank. If that’s the case, check out this huge round-up of essay topics for high school. You’ll find choices for every subject and writing style.

  • Argumentative Essay Topics
  • Cause-and-Effect Essay Topics
  • Compare-Contrast Essay Topics
  • Descriptive Essay Topics
  • Expository and Informative Essay Topics
  • Humorous Essay Topics

Literary Essay Topics

  • Narrative and Personal Essay Topics
  • Personal Essay Topics
  • Persuasive Essay Topics

Research Essay Topics

Argumentative essay topics for high school.

When writing an argumentative essay, remember to do the research and lay out the facts clearly. Your goal is not necessarily to persuade someone to agree with you, but to encourage your reader to accept your point of view as valid. Here are some possible argumentative topics to try. ( Here are 100 more compelling argumentative essay topics. )

  • The most important challenge our country is currently facing is … (e.g., immigration, gun control, economy)
  • The government should provide free internet access for every citizen.
  • All drugs should be legalized, regulated, and taxed.
  • Vaping is less harmful than smoking tobacco.
  • The best country in the world is …
  • Parents should be punished for their minor children’s crimes.
  • Should all students have the ability to attend college for free?
  • Should physical education be part of the standard high school curriculum?

Should physical education be part of the standard high school curriculum?

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  • Schools should require recommended vaccines for all students, with very limited exceptions.
  • Is it acceptable to use animals for experiments and research?
  • Does social media do more harm than good?
  • Capital punishment does/does not deter crime.
  • What one class should all high schools students be required to take and pass in order to graduate?
  • Do we really learn anything from history, or does it just repeat itself over and over?
  • Are men and women treated equally?

Cause-and-Effect Essay Topics for High School

A cause-and-effect essay is a type of argumentative essay. Your goal is to show how one specific thing directly influences another specific thing. You’ll likely need to do some research to make your point. Here are some ideas for cause-and-effect essays. ( Get a big list of 100 cause-and-effect essay topics here. )

  • Humans are causing accelerated climate change.
  • Fast-food restaurants have made human health worse over the decades.
  • What caused World War II? (Choose any conflict for this one.)
  • Describe the effects social media has on young adults.

Describe the effects social media has on young adults.

  • How does playing sports affect people?
  • What are the effects of loving to read?
  • Being an only/oldest/youngest/middle child makes you …
  • What effect does violence in movies or video games have on kids?
  • Traveling to new places opens people’s minds to new ideas.
  • Racism is caused by …

Compare-Contrast Essay Topics for High School

As the name indicates, in compare-and-contrast essays, writers show the similarities and differences between two things. They combine descriptive writing with analysis, making connections and showing dissimilarities. The following ideas work well for compare-contrast essays. ( Find 80+ compare-contrast essay topics for all ages here. )

  • Public and private schools
  • Capitalism vs. communism
  • Monarchy or democracy
  • Dogs vs. cats as pets

Dogs vs. cats as pets

  • Paper books or e-books
  • Two political candidates in a current race
  • Going to college vs. starting work full-time
  • Working your way through college as you go or taking out student loans
  • iPhone or Android
  • Instagram vs. Twitter (or choose any other two social media platforms)

Descriptive Essay Topics for High School

Bring on the adjectives! Descriptive writing is all about creating a rich picture for the reader. Take readers on a journey to far-off places, help them understand an experience, or introduce them to a new person. Remember: Show, don’t tell. These topics make excellent descriptive essays.

  • Who is the funniest person you know?
  • What is your happiest memory?
  • Tell about the most inspirational person in your life.
  • Write about your favorite place.
  • When you were little, what was your favorite thing to do?
  • Choose a piece of art or music and explain how it makes you feel.
  • What is your earliest memory?

What is your earliest memory?

  • What’s the best/worst vacation you’ve ever taken?
  • Describe your favorite pet.
  • What is the most important item in the world to you?
  • Give a tour of your bedroom (or another favorite room in your home).
  • Describe yourself to someone who has never met you.
  • Lay out your perfect day from start to finish.
  • Explain what it’s like to move to a new town or start a new school.
  • Tell what it would be like to live on the moon.

Expository and Informative Essay Topics for High School

Expository essays set out clear explanations of a particular topic. You might be defining a word or phrase or explaining how something works. Expository or informative essays are based on facts, and while you might explore different points of view, you won’t necessarily say which one is “better” or “right.” Remember: Expository essays educate the reader. Here are some expository and informative essay topics to explore. ( See 70+ expository and informative essay topics here. )

  • What makes a good leader?
  • Explain why a given school subject (math, history, science, etc.) is important for students to learn.
  • What is the “glass ceiling” and how does it affect society?
  • Describe how the internet changed the world.
  • What does it mean to be a good teacher?

What does it mean to be a good teacher?

  • Explain how we could colonize the moon or another planet.
  • Discuss why mental health is just as important as physical health.
  • Describe a healthy lifestyle for a teenager.
  • Choose an American president and explain how their time in office affected the country.
  • What does “financial responsibility” mean?

Humorous Essay Topics for High School

Humorous essays can take on any form, like narrative, persuasive, or expository. You might employ sarcasm or satire, or simply tell a story about a funny person or event. Even though these essay topics are lighthearted, they still take some skill to tackle well. Give these ideas a try.

  • What would happen if cats (or any other animal) ruled the world?
  • What do newborn babies wish their parents knew?
  • Explain the best ways to be annoying on social media.
  • Invent a wacky new sport, explain the rules, and describe a game or match.

Explain why it's important to eat dessert first.

  • Imagine a discussion between two historic figures from very different times, like Cleopatra and Queen Elizabeth I.
  • Retell a familiar story in tweets or other social media posts.
  • Describe present-day Earth from an alien’s point of view.
  • Choose a fictional character and explain why they should be the next president.
  • Describe a day when kids are in charge of everything, at school and at home.

Literary essays analyze a piece of writing, like a book or a play. In high school, students usually write literary essays about the works they study in class. These literary essay topic ideas focus on books students often read in high school, but many of them can be tweaked to fit other works as well.

  • Discuss the portrayal of women in Shakespeare’s Othello .
  • Explore the symbolism used in The Scarlet Letter .
  • Explain the importance of dreams in Of Mice and Men .
  • Compare and contrast the romantic relationships in Pride and Prejudice .

Analyze the role of the witches in Macbeth.

  • Dissect the allegory of Animal Farm and its relation to contemporary events.
  • Interpret the author’s take on society and class structure in The Great Gatsby .
  • Explore the relationship between Hamlet and Ophelia.
  • Discuss whether Shakespeare’s portrayal of young love in Romeo and Juliet is accurate.
  • Explain the imagery used in Beowulf .

Narrative and Personal Essay Topics for High School

Think of a narrative essay like telling a story. Use some of the same techniques that you would for a descriptive essay, but be sure you have a beginning, middle, and end. A narrative essay doesn’t necessarily need to be personal, but they often are. Take inspiration from these narrative and personal essay topics.

  • Describe a performance or sporting event you took part in.
  • Explain the process of cooking and eating your favorite meal.
  • Write about meeting your best friend for the first time and how your relationship developed.
  • Tell about learning to ride a bike or drive a car.
  • Describe a time in your life when you’ve been scared.

Write about a time when you or someone you know displayed courage.

  • Share the most embarrassing thing that ever happened to you.
  • Tell about a time when you overcame a big challenge.
  • Tell the story of how you learned an important life lesson.
  • Describe a time when you or someone you know experienced prejudice or oppression.
  • Explain a family tradition, how it developed, and its importance today.
  • What is your favorite holiday? How does your family celebrate it?
  • Retell a familiar story from the point of view of a different character.
  • Describe a time when you had to make a difficult decision.
  • Tell about your proudest moment.

Persuasive Essay Topics for High School

Persuasive essays are similar to argumentative , but they rely less on facts and more on emotion to sway the reader. It’s important to know your audience, so you can anticipate any counterarguments they might make and try to overcome them. Try these topics to persuade someone to come around to your point of view. ( Discover 60 more intriguing persuasive essay topics here. )

  • Do you think homework should be required, optional, or not given at all?
  • Everyone should be vegetarian or vegan.
  • What animal makes the best pet?
  • Visit an animal shelter, choose an animal that needs a home, and write an essay persuading someone to adopt that animal.
  • Who is the world’s best athlete, present or past?
  • Should little kids be allowed to play competitive sports?
  • Are professional athletes/musicians/actors overpaid?
  • The best music genre is …

What is one book that everyone should be required to read?

  • Is democracy the best form of government?
  • Is capitalism the best form of economy?
  • Students should/should not be able to use their phones during the school day.
  • Should schools have dress codes?
  • If I could change one school rule, it would be …
  • Is year-round school a good idea?

A research essay is a classic high school assignment. These papers require deep research into primary source documents, with lots of supporting facts and evidence that’s properly cited. Research essays can be in any of the styles shown above. Here are some possible topics, across a variety of subjects.

  • Which country’s style of government is best for the people who live there?
  • Choose a country and analyze its development from founding to present day.
  • Describe the causes and effects of a specific war.
  • Formulate an ideal economic plan for our country.
  • What scientific discovery has had the biggest impact on life today?

Tell the story of the development of artificial intelligence so far, and describe its impacts along the way.

  • Analyze the way mental health is viewed and treated in this country.
  • Explore the ways systemic racism impacts people in all walks of life.
  • Defend the importance of teaching music and the arts in public schools.
  • Choose one animal from the endangered species list, and propose a realistic plan to protect it.

What are some of your favorite essay topics for high school? Come share your prompts on the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook .

Plus, check out the ultimate guide to student writing contests .

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Research Topics & Ideas: Education

170+ Research Ideas To Fast-Track Your Project

Topic Kickstarter: Research topics in education

If you’re just starting out exploring education-related topics for your dissertation, thesis or research project, you’ve come to the right place. In this post, we’ll help kickstart your research topic ideation process by providing a hearty list of research topics and ideas , including examples from actual dissertations and theses..

PS – This is just the start…

We know it’s exciting to run through a list of research topics, but please keep in mind that this list is just a starting point . To develop a suitable education-related research topic, you’ll need to identify a clear and convincing research gap , and a viable plan of action to fill that gap.

If this sounds foreign to you, check out our free research topic webinar that explores how to find and refine a high-quality research topic, from scratch. Alternatively, if you’d like hands-on help, consider our 1-on-1 coaching service .

Overview: Education Research Topics

  • How to find a research topic (video)
  • List of 50+ education-related research topics/ideas
  • List of 120+ level-specific research topics 
  • Examples of actual dissertation topics in education
  • Tips to fast-track your topic ideation (video)
  • Free Webinar : Topic Ideation 101
  • Where to get extra help

Education-Related Research Topics & Ideas

Below you’ll find a list of education-related research topics and idea kickstarters. These are fairly broad and flexible to various contexts, so keep in mind that you will need to refine them a little. Nevertheless, they should inspire some ideas for your project.

  • The impact of school funding on student achievement
  • The effects of social and emotional learning on student well-being
  • The effects of parental involvement on student behaviour
  • The impact of teacher training on student learning
  • The impact of classroom design on student learning
  • The impact of poverty on education
  • The use of student data to inform instruction
  • The role of parental involvement in education
  • The effects of mindfulness practices in the classroom
  • The use of technology in the classroom
  • The role of critical thinking in education
  • The use of formative and summative assessments in the classroom
  • The use of differentiated instruction in the classroom
  • The use of gamification in education
  • The effects of teacher burnout on student learning
  • The impact of school leadership on student achievement
  • The effects of teacher diversity on student outcomes
  • The role of teacher collaboration in improving student outcomes
  • The implementation of blended and online learning
  • The effects of teacher accountability on student achievement
  • The effects of standardized testing on student learning
  • The effects of classroom management on student behaviour
  • The effects of school culture on student achievement
  • The use of student-centred learning in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher-student relationships on student outcomes
  • The achievement gap in minority and low-income students
  • The use of culturally responsive teaching in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher professional development on student learning
  • The use of project-based learning in the classroom
  • The effects of teacher expectations on student achievement
  • The use of adaptive learning technology in the classroom
  • The impact of teacher turnover on student learning
  • The effects of teacher recruitment and retention on student learning
  • The impact of early childhood education on later academic success
  • The impact of parental involvement on student engagement
  • The use of positive reinforcement in education
  • The impact of school climate on student engagement
  • The role of STEM education in preparing students for the workforce
  • The effects of school choice on student achievement
  • The use of technology in the form of online tutoring

Level-Specific Research Topics

Looking for research topics for a specific level of education? We’ve got you covered. Below you can find research topic ideas for primary, secondary and tertiary-level education contexts. Click the relevant level to view the respective list.

Research Topics: Pick An Education Level

Primary education.

  • Investigating the effects of peer tutoring on academic achievement in primary school
  • Exploring the benefits of mindfulness practices in primary school classrooms
  • Examining the effects of different teaching strategies on primary school students’ problem-solving skills
  • The use of storytelling as a teaching strategy in primary school literacy instruction
  • The role of cultural diversity in promoting tolerance and understanding in primary schools
  • The impact of character education programs on moral development in primary school students
  • Investigating the use of technology in enhancing primary school mathematics education
  • The impact of inclusive curriculum on promoting equity and diversity in primary schools
  • The impact of outdoor education programs on environmental awareness in primary school students
  • The influence of school climate on student motivation and engagement in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of early literacy interventions on reading comprehension in primary school students
  • The impact of parental involvement in school decision-making processes on student achievement in primary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of inclusive education for students with special needs in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of teacher-student feedback on academic motivation in primary schools
  • The role of technology in developing digital literacy skills in primary school students
  • Effective strategies for fostering a growth mindset in primary school students
  • Investigating the role of parental support in reducing academic stress in primary school children
  • The role of arts education in fostering creativity and self-expression in primary school students
  • Examining the effects of early childhood education programs on primary school readiness
  • Examining the effects of homework on primary school students’ academic performance
  • The role of formative assessment in improving learning outcomes in primary school classrooms
  • The impact of teacher-student relationships on academic outcomes in primary school
  • Investigating the effects of classroom environment on student behavior and learning outcomes in primary schools
  • Investigating the role of creativity and imagination in primary school curriculum
  • The impact of nutrition and healthy eating programs on academic performance in primary schools
  • The impact of social-emotional learning programs on primary school students’ well-being and academic performance
  • The role of parental involvement in academic achievement of primary school children
  • Examining the effects of classroom management strategies on student behavior in primary school
  • The role of school leadership in creating a positive school climate Exploring the benefits of bilingual education in primary schools
  • The effectiveness of project-based learning in developing critical thinking skills in primary school students
  • The role of inquiry-based learning in fostering curiosity and critical thinking in primary school students
  • The effects of class size on student engagement and achievement in primary schools
  • Investigating the effects of recess and physical activity breaks on attention and learning in primary school
  • Exploring the benefits of outdoor play in developing gross motor skills in primary school children
  • The effects of educational field trips on knowledge retention in primary school students
  • Examining the effects of inclusive classroom practices on students’ attitudes towards diversity in primary schools
  • The impact of parental involvement in homework on primary school students’ academic achievement
  • Investigating the effectiveness of different assessment methods in primary school classrooms
  • The influence of physical activity and exercise on cognitive development in primary school children
  • Exploring the benefits of cooperative learning in promoting social skills in primary school students

Secondary Education

  • Investigating the effects of school discipline policies on student behavior and academic success in secondary education
  • The role of social media in enhancing communication and collaboration among secondary school students
  • The impact of school leadership on teacher effectiveness and student outcomes in secondary schools
  • Investigating the effects of technology integration on teaching and learning in secondary education
  • Exploring the benefits of interdisciplinary instruction in promoting critical thinking skills in secondary schools
  • The impact of arts education on creativity and self-expression in secondary school students
  • The effectiveness of flipped classrooms in promoting student learning in secondary education
  • The role of career guidance programs in preparing secondary school students for future employment
  • Investigating the effects of student-centered learning approaches on student autonomy and academic success in secondary schools
  • The impact of socio-economic factors on educational attainment in secondary education
  • Investigating the impact of project-based learning on student engagement and academic achievement in secondary schools
  • Investigating the effects of multicultural education on cultural understanding and tolerance in secondary schools
  • The influence of standardized testing on teaching practices and student learning in secondary education
  • Investigating the effects of classroom management strategies on student behavior and academic engagement in secondary education
  • The influence of teacher professional development on instructional practices and student outcomes in secondary schools
  • The role of extracurricular activities in promoting holistic development and well-roundedness in secondary school students
  • Investigating the effects of blended learning models on student engagement and achievement in secondary education
  • The role of physical education in promoting physical health and well-being among secondary school students
  • Investigating the effects of gender on academic achievement and career aspirations in secondary education
  • Exploring the benefits of multicultural literature in promoting cultural awareness and empathy among secondary school students
  • The impact of school counseling services on student mental health and well-being in secondary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of vocational education and training in preparing secondary school students for the workforce
  • The role of digital literacy in preparing secondary school students for the digital age
  • The influence of parental involvement on academic success and well-being of secondary school students
  • The impact of social-emotional learning programs on secondary school students’ well-being and academic success
  • The role of character education in fostering ethical and responsible behavior in secondary school students
  • Examining the effects of digital citizenship education on responsible and ethical technology use among secondary school students
  • The impact of parental involvement in school decision-making processes on student outcomes in secondary schools
  • The role of educational technology in promoting personalized learning experiences in secondary schools
  • The impact of inclusive education on the social and academic outcomes of students with disabilities in secondary schools
  • The influence of parental support on academic motivation and achievement in secondary education
  • The role of school climate in promoting positive behavior and well-being among secondary school students
  • Examining the effects of peer mentoring programs on academic achievement and social-emotional development in secondary schools
  • Examining the effects of teacher-student relationships on student motivation and achievement in secondary schools
  • Exploring the benefits of service-learning programs in promoting civic engagement among secondary school students
  • The impact of educational policies on educational equity and access in secondary education
  • Examining the effects of homework on academic achievement and student well-being in secondary education
  • Investigating the effects of different assessment methods on student performance in secondary schools
  • Examining the effects of single-sex education on academic performance and gender stereotypes in secondary schools
  • The role of mentoring programs in supporting the transition from secondary to post-secondary education

Tertiary Education

  • The role of student support services in promoting academic success and well-being in higher education
  • The impact of internationalization initiatives on students’ intercultural competence and global perspectives in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effects of active learning classrooms and learning spaces on student engagement and learning outcomes in tertiary education
  • Exploring the benefits of service-learning experiences in fostering civic engagement and social responsibility in higher education
  • The influence of learning communities and collaborative learning environments on student academic and social integration in higher education
  • Exploring the benefits of undergraduate research experiences in fostering critical thinking and scientific inquiry skills
  • Investigating the effects of academic advising and mentoring on student retention and degree completion in higher education
  • The role of student engagement and involvement in co-curricular activities on holistic student development in higher education
  • The impact of multicultural education on fostering cultural competence and diversity appreciation in higher education
  • The role of internships and work-integrated learning experiences in enhancing students’ employability and career outcomes
  • Examining the effects of assessment and feedback practices on student learning and academic achievement in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty professional development on instructional practices and student outcomes in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty-student relationships on student success and well-being in tertiary education
  • The impact of college transition programs on students’ academic and social adjustment to higher education
  • The impact of online learning platforms on student learning outcomes in higher education
  • The impact of financial aid and scholarships on access and persistence in higher education
  • The influence of student leadership and involvement in extracurricular activities on personal development and campus engagement
  • Exploring the benefits of competency-based education in developing job-specific skills in tertiary students
  • Examining the effects of flipped classroom models on student learning and retention in higher education
  • Exploring the benefits of online collaboration and virtual team projects in developing teamwork skills in tertiary students
  • Investigating the effects of diversity and inclusion initiatives on campus climate and student experiences in tertiary education
  • The influence of study abroad programs on intercultural competence and global perspectives of college students
  • Investigating the effects of peer mentoring and tutoring programs on student retention and academic performance in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effectiveness of active learning strategies in promoting student engagement and achievement in tertiary education
  • Investigating the effects of blended learning models and hybrid courses on student learning and satisfaction in higher education
  • The role of digital literacy and information literacy skills in supporting student success in the digital age
  • Investigating the effects of experiential learning opportunities on career readiness and employability of college students
  • The impact of e-portfolios on student reflection, self-assessment, and showcasing of learning in higher education
  • The role of technology in enhancing collaborative learning experiences in tertiary classrooms
  • The impact of research opportunities on undergraduate student engagement and pursuit of advanced degrees
  • Examining the effects of competency-based assessment on measuring student learning and achievement in tertiary education
  • Examining the effects of interdisciplinary programs and courses on critical thinking and problem-solving skills in college students
  • The role of inclusive education and accessibility in promoting equitable learning experiences for diverse student populations
  • The role of career counseling and guidance in supporting students’ career decision-making in tertiary education
  • The influence of faculty diversity and representation on student success and inclusive learning environments in higher education

Research topic idea mega list

Education-Related Dissertations & Theses

While the ideas we’ve presented above are a decent starting point for finding a research topic in education, they are fairly generic and non-specific. So, it helps to look at actual dissertations and theses in the education space to see how this all comes together in practice.

Below, we’ve included a selection of education-related research projects to help refine your thinking. These are actual dissertations and theses, written as part of Master’s and PhD-level programs, so they can provide some useful insight as to what a research topic looks like in practice.

  • From Rural to Urban: Education Conditions of Migrant Children in China (Wang, 2019)
  • Energy Renovation While Learning English: A Guidebook for Elementary ESL Teachers (Yang, 2019)
  • A Reanalyses of Intercorrelational Matrices of Visual and Verbal Learners’ Abilities, Cognitive Styles, and Learning Preferences (Fox, 2020)
  • A study of the elementary math program utilized by a mid-Missouri school district (Barabas, 2020)
  • Instructor formative assessment practices in virtual learning environments : a posthumanist sociomaterial perspective (Burcks, 2019)
  • Higher education students services: a qualitative study of two mid-size universities’ direct exchange programs (Kinde, 2020)
  • Exploring editorial leadership : a qualitative study of scholastic journalism advisers teaching leadership in Missouri secondary schools (Lewis, 2020)
  • Selling the virtual university: a multimodal discourse analysis of marketing for online learning (Ludwig, 2020)
  • Advocacy and accountability in school counselling: assessing the use of data as related to professional self-efficacy (Matthews, 2020)
  • The use of an application screening assessment as a predictor of teaching retention at a midwestern, K-12, public school district (Scarbrough, 2020)
  • Core values driving sustained elite performance cultures (Beiner, 2020)
  • Educative features of upper elementary Eureka math curriculum (Dwiggins, 2020)
  • How female principals nurture adult learning opportunities in successful high schools with challenging student demographics (Woodward, 2020)
  • The disproportionality of Black Males in Special Education: A Case Study Analysis of Educator Perceptions in a Southeastern Urban High School (McCrae, 2021)

As you can see, these research topics are a lot more focused than the generic topic ideas we presented earlier. So, in order for you to develop a high-quality research topic, you’ll need to get specific and laser-focused on a specific context with specific variables of interest.  In the video below, we explore some other important things you’ll need to consider when crafting your research topic.

Get 1-On-1 Help

If you’re still unsure about how to find a quality research topic within education, check out our Research Topic Kickstarter service, which is the perfect starting point for developing a unique, well-justified research topic.

Research Topic Kickstarter - Need Help Finding A Research Topic?

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You can find our list of nursing-related research topic ideas here: https://gradcoach.com/research-topics-nursing/

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Write on action research topic, using guidance and counseling to address unwanted teenage pregnancy in school

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Mercedes Bunsie

parental involvement and students academic performance

Abshir Mustafe Cali

Science education topics?

alina

plz tell me if you got some good topics, im here for finding research topic for masters degree

Karen Joy Andrade

How about School management and supervision pls.?

JOHANNES SERAME MONYATSI

Hi i am an Deputy Principal in a primary school. My wish is to srudy foe Master’s degree in Education.Please advice me on which topic can be relevant for me. Thanks.

NKWAIN Chia Charles

Every topic proposed above on primary education is a starting point for me. I appreciate immensely the team that has sat down to make a detail of these selected topics just for beginners like us. Be blessed.

Nkwain Chia Charles

Kindly help me with the research questions on the topic” Effects of workplace conflict on the employees’ job performance”. The effects can be applicable in every institution,enterprise or organisation.

Kelvin Kells Grant

Greetings, I am a student majoring in Sociology and minoring in Public Administration. I’m considering any recommended research topic in the field of Sociology.

Sulemana Alhassan

I’m a student pursuing Mphil in Basic education and I’m considering any recommended research proposal topic in my field of study

Cristine

Research Defense for students in senior high

Kupoluyi Regina

Kindly help me with a research topic in educational psychology. Ph.D level. Thank you.

Project-based learning is a teaching/learning type,if well applied in a classroom setting will yield serious positive impact. What can a teacher do to implement this in a disadvantaged zone like “North West Region of Cameroon ( hinterland) where war has brought about prolonged and untold sufferings on the indegins?

Damaris Nzoka

I wish to get help on topics of research on educational administration

I wish to get help on topics of research on educational administration PhD level

Sadaf

I am also looking for such type of title

Afriyie Saviour

I am a student of undergraduate, doing research on how to use guidance and counseling to address unwanted teenage pregnancy in school

wysax

the topics are very good regarding research & education .

William AU Mill

Can i request your suggestion topic for my Thesis about Teachers as an OFW. thanx you

ChRISTINE

Would like to request for suggestions on a topic in Economics of education,PhD level

Aza Hans

Would like to request for suggestions on a topic in Economics of education

George

Hi 👋 I request that you help me with a written research proposal about education the format

Cynthia abuabire

Am offering degree in education senior high School Accounting. I want a topic for my project work

Sarah Moyambo

l would like to request suggestions on a topic in managing teaching and learning, PhD level (educational leadership and management)

request suggestions on a topic in managing teaching and learning, PhD level (educational leadership and management)

Ernest Gyabaah

I would to inquire on research topics on Educational psychology, Masters degree

Aron kirui

I am PhD student, I am searching my Research topic, It should be innovative,my area of interest is online education,use of technology in education

revathy a/p letchumanan

request suggestion on topic in masters in medical education .

D.Newlands PhD.

Look at British Library as they keep a copy of all PhDs in the UK Core.ac.uk to access Open University and 6 other university e-archives, pdf downloads mostly available, all free.

Monica

May I also ask for a topic based on mathematics education for college teaching, please?

Aman

Please I am a masters student of the department of Teacher Education, Faculty of Education Please I am in need of proposed project topics to help with my final year thesis

Ellyjoy

Am a PhD student in Educational Foundations would like a sociological topic. Thank

muhammad sani

please i need a proposed thesis project regardging computer science

also916

Greetings and Regards I am a doctoral student in the field of philosophy of education. I am looking for a new topic for my thesis. Because of my work in the elementary school, I am looking for a topic that is from the field of elementary education and is related to the philosophy of education.

shantel orox

Masters student in the field of curriculum, any ideas of a research topic on low achiever students

Rey

In the field of curriculum any ideas of a research topic on deconalization in contextualization of digital teaching and learning through in higher education

Omada Victoria Enyojo

Amazing guidelines

JAMES MALUKI MUTIA

I am a graduate with two masters. 1) Master of arts in religious studies and 2) Master in education in foundations of education. I intend to do a Ph.D. on my second master’s, however, I need to bring both masters together through my Ph.D. research. can I do something like, ” The contribution of Philosophy of education for a quality religion education in Kenya”? kindly, assist and be free to suggest a similar topic that will bring together the two masters. thanks in advance

betiel

Hi, I am an Early childhood trainer as well as a researcher, I need more support on this topic: The impact of early childhood education on later academic success.

TURIKUMWE JEAN BOSCO

I’m a student in upper level secondary school and I need your support in this research topics: “Impact of incorporating project -based learning in teaching English language skills in secondary schools”.

Fitsum Ayele

Although research activities and topics should stem from reflection on one’s practice, I found this site valuable as it effectively addressed many issues we have been experiencing as practitioners.

Lavern Stigers

Your style is unique in comparison to other folks I’ve read stuff from. Thanks for posting when you have the opportunity, Guess I will just book mark this site.

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  • Research Skills

50 Mini-Lessons For Teaching Students Research Skills

Please note, I am no longer blogging and this post hasn’t updated since April 2020.

For a number of years, Seth Godin has been talking about the need to “ connect the dots” rather than “collect the dots” . That is, rather than memorising information, students must be able to learn how to solve new problems, see patterns, and combine multiple perspectives.

Solid research skills underpin this. Having the fluency to find and use information successfully is an essential skill for life and work.

Today’s students have more information at their fingertips than ever before and this means the role of the teacher as a guide is more important than ever.

You might be wondering how you can fit teaching research skills into a busy curriculum? There aren’t enough hours in the day! The good news is, there are so many mini-lessons you can do to build students’ skills over time.

This post outlines 50 ideas for activities that could be done in just a few minutes (or stretched out to a longer lesson if you have the time!).

Learn More About The Research Process

I have a popular post called Teach Students How To Research Online In 5 Steps. It outlines a five-step approach to break down the research process into manageable chunks.

Learn about a simple search process for students in primary school, middle school, or high school Kathleen Morris

This post shares ideas for mini-lessons that could be carried out in the classroom throughout the year to help build students’ skills in the five areas of: clarify, search, delve, evaluate , and cite . It also includes ideas for learning about staying organised throughout the research process.

Notes about the 50 research activities:

  • These ideas can be adapted for different age groups from middle primary/elementary to senior high school.
  • Many of these ideas can be repeated throughout the year.
  • Depending on the age of your students, you can decide whether the activity will be more teacher or student led. Some activities suggest coming up with a list of words, questions, or phrases. Teachers of younger students could generate these themselves.
  • Depending on how much time you have, many of the activities can be either quickly modelled by the teacher, or extended to an hour-long lesson.
  • Some of the activities could fit into more than one category.
  • Looking for simple articles for younger students for some of the activities? Try DOGO News or Time for Kids . Newsela is also a great resource but you do need to sign up for free account.
  • Why not try a few activities in a staff meeting? Everyone can always brush up on their own research skills!

research topics for junior high school students

  • Choose a topic (e.g. koalas, basketball, Mount Everest) . Write as many questions as you can think of relating to that topic.
  • Make a mindmap of a topic you’re currently learning about. This could be either on paper or using an online tool like Bubbl.us .
  • Read a short book or article. Make a list of 5 words from the text that you don’t totally understand. Look up the meaning of the words in a dictionary (online or paper).
  • Look at a printed or digital copy of a short article with the title removed. Come up with as many different titles as possible that would fit the article.
  • Come up with a list of 5 different questions you could type into Google (e.g. Which country in Asia has the largest population?) Circle the keywords in each question.
  • Write down 10 words to describe a person, place, or topic. Come up with synonyms for these words using a tool like  Thesaurus.com .
  • Write pairs of synonyms on post-it notes (this could be done by the teacher or students). Each student in the class has one post-it note and walks around the classroom to find the person with the synonym to their word.

research topics for junior high school students

  • Explore how to search Google using your voice (i.e. click/tap on the microphone in the Google search box or on your phone/tablet keyboard) . List the pros and cons of using voice and text to search.
  • Open two different search engines in your browser such as Google and Bing. Type in a query and compare the results. Do all search engines work exactly the same?
  • Have students work in pairs to try out a different search engine (there are 11 listed here ). Report back to the class on the pros and cons.
  • Think of something you’re curious about, (e.g. What endangered animals live in the Amazon Rainforest?). Open Google in two tabs. In one search, type in one or two keywords ( e.g. Amazon Rainforest) . In the other search type in multiple relevant keywords (e.g. endangered animals Amazon rainforest).  Compare the results. Discuss the importance of being specific.
  • Similar to above, try two different searches where one phrase is in quotation marks and the other is not. For example, Origin of “raining cats and dogs” and Origin of raining cats and dogs . Discuss the difference that using quotation marks makes (It tells Google to search for the precise keywords in order.)
  • Try writing a question in Google with a few minor spelling mistakes. What happens? What happens if you add or leave out punctuation ?
  • Try the AGoogleADay.com daily search challenges from Google. The questions help older students learn about choosing keywords, deconstructing questions, and altering keywords.
  • Explore how Google uses autocomplete to suggest searches quickly. Try it out by typing in various queries (e.g. How to draw… or What is the tallest…). Discuss how these suggestions come about, how to use them, and whether they’re usually helpful.
  • Watch this video  from Code.org to learn more about how search works .
  • Take a look at  20 Instant Google Searches your Students Need to Know  by Eric Curts to learn about “ instant searches ”. Try one to try out. Perhaps each student could be assigned one to try and share with the class.
  • Experiment with typing some questions into Google that have a clear answer (e.g. “What is a parallelogram?” or “What is the highest mountain in the world?” or “What is the population of Australia?”). Look at the different ways the answers are displayed instantly within the search results — dictionary definitions, image cards, graphs etc.

What is the population of Australia

  • Watch the video How Does Google Know Everything About Me?  by Scientific American. Discuss the PageRank algorithm and how Google uses your data to customise search results.
  • Brainstorm a list of popular domains   (e.g. .com, .com.au, or your country’s domain) . Discuss if any domains might be more reliable than others and why (e.g. .gov or .edu) .
  • Discuss (or research) ways to open Google search results in a new tab to save your original search results  (i.e. right-click > open link in new tab or press control/command and click the link).
  • Try out a few Google searches (perhaps start with things like “car service” “cat food” or “fresh flowers”). A re there advertisements within the results? Discuss where these appear and how to spot them.
  • Look at ways to filter search results by using the tabs at the top of the page in Google (i.e. news, images, shopping, maps, videos etc.). Do the same filters appear for all Google searches? Try out a few different searches and see.
  • Type a question into Google and look for the “People also ask” and “Searches related to…” sections. Discuss how these could be useful. When should you use them or ignore them so you don’t go off on an irrelevant tangent? Is the information in the drop-down section under “People also ask” always the best?
  • Often, more current search results are more useful. Click on “tools” under the Google search box and then “any time” and your time frame of choice such as “Past month” or “Past year”.
  • Have students annotate their own “anatomy of a search result” example like the one I made below. Explore the different ways search results display; some have more details like sitelinks and some do not.

Anatomy of a google search result

  • Find two articles on a news topic from different publications. Or find a news article and an opinion piece on the same topic. Make a Venn diagram comparing the similarities and differences.
  • Choose a graph, map, or chart from The New York Times’ What’s Going On In This Graph series . Have a whole class or small group discussion about the data.
  • Look at images stripped of their captions on What’s Going On In This Picture? by The New York Times. Discuss the images in pairs or small groups. What can you tell?
  • Explore a website together as a class or in pairs — perhaps a news website. Identify all the advertisements .
  • Have a look at a fake website either as a whole class or in pairs/small groups. See if students can spot that these sites are not real. Discuss the fact that you can’t believe everything that’s online. Get started with these four examples of fake websites from Eric Curts.
  • Give students a copy of my website evaluation flowchart to analyse and then discuss as a class. Read more about the flowchart in this post.
  • As a class, look at a prompt from Mike Caulfield’s Four Moves . Either together or in small groups, have students fact check the prompts on the site. This resource explains more about the fact checking process. Note: some of these prompts are not suitable for younger students.
  • Practice skim reading — give students one minute to read a short article. Ask them to discuss what stood out to them. Headings? Bold words? Quotes? Then give students ten minutes to read the same article and discuss deep reading.

research topics for junior high school students

All students can benefit from learning about plagiarism, copyright, how to write information in their own words, and how to acknowledge the source. However, the formality of this process will depend on your students’ age and your curriculum guidelines.

  • Watch the video Citation for Beginners for an introduction to citation. Discuss the key points to remember.
  • Look up the definition of plagiarism using a variety of sources (dictionary, video, Wikipedia etc.). Create a definition as a class.
  • Find an interesting video on YouTube (perhaps a “life hack” video) and write a brief summary in your own words.
  • Have students pair up and tell each other about their weekend. Then have the listener try to verbalise or write their friend’s recount in their own words. Discuss how accurate this was.
  • Read the class a copy of a well known fairy tale. Have them write a short summary in their own words. Compare the versions that different students come up with.
  • Try out MyBib — a handy free online tool without ads that helps you create citations quickly and easily.
  • Give primary/elementary students a copy of Kathy Schrock’s Guide to Citation that matches their grade level (the guide covers grades 1 to 6). Choose one form of citation and create some examples as a class (e.g. a website or a book).
  • Make a list of things that are okay and not okay to do when researching, e.g. copy text from a website, use any image from Google images, paraphrase in your own words and cite your source, add a short quote and cite the source. 
  • Have students read a short article and then come up with a summary that would be considered plagiarism and one that would not be considered plagiarism. These could be shared with the class and the students asked to decide which one shows an example of plagiarism .
  • Older students could investigate the difference between paraphrasing and summarising . They could create a Venn diagram that compares the two.
  • Write a list of statements on the board that might be true or false ( e.g. The 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia. The rhinoceros is the largest land animal in the world. The current marathon world record is 2 hours, 7 minutes). Have students research these statements and decide whether they’re true or false by sharing their citations.

Staying Organised

research topics for junior high school students

  • Make a list of different ways you can take notes while researching — Google Docs, Google Keep, pen and paper etc. Discuss the pros and cons of each method.
  • Learn the keyboard shortcuts to help manage tabs (e.g. open new tab, reopen closed tab, go to next tab etc.). Perhaps students could all try out the shortcuts and share their favourite one with the class.
  • Find a collection of resources on a topic and add them to a Wakelet .
  • Listen to a short podcast or watch a brief video on a certain topic and sketchnote ideas. Sylvia Duckworth has some great tips about live sketchnoting
  • Learn how to use split screen to have one window open with your research, and another open with your notes (e.g. a Google spreadsheet, Google Doc, Microsoft Word or OneNote etc.) .

All teachers know it’s important to teach students to research well. Investing time in this process will also pay off throughout the year and the years to come. Students will be able to focus on analysing and synthesizing information, rather than the mechanics of the research process.

By trying out as many of these mini-lessons as possible throughout the year, you’ll be really helping your students to thrive in all areas of school, work, and life.

Also remember to model your own searches explicitly during class time. Talk out loud as you look things up and ask students for input. Learning together is the way to go!

You Might Also Enjoy Reading:

How To Evaluate Websites: A Guide For Teachers And Students

Five Tips for Teaching Students How to Research and Filter Information

Typing Tips: The How and Why of Teaching Students Keyboarding Skills

8 Ways Teachers And Schools Can Communicate With Parents

Learn how to teach research skills to primary students, middle school students, or high school students. 50 activities that could be done in just a few minutes a day. Lots of Google search tips and research tips for kids and teachers. Free PDF included! Kathleen Morris | Primary Tech

10 Replies to “50 Mini-Lessons For Teaching Students Research Skills”

Loving these ideas, thank you

This list is amazing. Thank you so much!

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So glad it’s helpful, Alex! 🙂

Hi I am a student who really needed some help on how to reasearch thanks for the help.

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So glad it helped! 🙂

seriously seriously grateful for your post. 🙂

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So glad it’s helpful! Makes my day 🙂

How do you get the 50 mini lessons. I got the free one but am interested in the full version.

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Hi Tracey, The link to the PDF with the 50 mini lessons is in the post. Here it is . Check out this post if you need more advice on teaching students how to research online. Hope that helps! Kathleen

Best wishes to you as you face your health battler. Hoping you’ve come out stronger and healthier from it. Your website is so helpful.

Comments are closed.

Summer 2024 Admissions for 1-on-1 Research Mentorship is OPEN.  Watch information session recording here (featuring former and current Admission Officers at Havard and UPenn).

5 Free Virtual Research Opportunities For High School Students

5 Free Virtual Research Opportunities For High School Students

Virtual research opportunities for high school students are programs that provide hands-on experience and research projects in various STEM fields, such as mathematics, computer science, computational biology, physics, neuroscience, and engineering. These programs are designed to deepen students’ understanding of STEM and help them develop the skills needed to succeed in their academic and professional careers. 

Participating in these programs can also help high school students expand their knowledge and skills in their areas of interest and work on exciting, unsolved problems with established researchers from top-tier universities. 

Virtual research opportunities are especially useful for high school students who are unable to attend in-person programs due to distance, cost, or other factors. They offer a flexible and accessible way to gain valuable experience and knowledge from the comfort of their own homes. In this article, we will discuss five free virtual research opportunities available for high school students.

1. MIT Primes  

MIT PRIMES is a free, year-long after-school program that provides research projects and guided reading to high school students in the areas of mathematics, computer science, and computational biology. The program is designed for students living within driving distance from Boston, and it offers four sections: PRIMES, PRIMES-USA, Menezes Challenge PRIMES Circle, and Yulia’s Dream.

PRIMES is a research-focused program in which participants work with MIT researchers to solve exciting, unsolved problems. PRIMES-USA is a distance mentoring math research section for high school juniors and sophomores from across the United States. Menezes Challenge PRIMES Circle is a math enrichment section for underrepresented groups living within commuting distance from Boston. Yulia’s Dream is a math enrichment and research program for exceptional high school students from Ukraine.

In addition to these sections, PRIMES runs two collaborative initiatives: MathROOTS, a two-week summer program for high-potential high school students from underrepresented backgrounds or underserved communities, and CrowdMath, a year-long online collaborative research project open to all high school and college students worldwide.

Finally, PRIMES STEP is a year-long math enrichment program for middle school students from Greater Boston.

Overall, MIT PRIMES aims to provide challenging and engaging opportunities for students with a passion for mathematics and science. Through research projects, guided reading, and collaborative initiatives, PRIMES seeks to foster the intellectual growth and development of high school and middle school students, and to inspire them to pursue their interests in these fields.

MIT PRIMES is a prestigious year-long after-school program that offers research projects and guided reading to high school students interested in mathematics, computer science, and computational biology. 

The admissions for the 2023 cycle are closed, and the admission decisions are made by February 1. However, for the 2024 cycle, new problem sets will be posted on October 1, 2023, and applicants will have until November 30, 2023, to solve the relevant problem set(s). 

To apply for MIT PRIMES, you must be a high school student (or a home-schooled student of high school age) living in the Greater Boston area, able to come to MIT weekly from February to May.

To apply, you need to fill out a questionnaire, ask for two or three letters of recommendation, and submit your solutions of the PRIMES problem set. Applicants to the Math section must solve the Math problem set (at least 70%), and applicants to the Computer Science and Computational Biology sections must solve the Computer Science problem set (100%) and the General part of the Math problem set (at least 70%). Admission decisions are based on all components of your application, and there is no application fee.

MIT PRIMES suggests a list of recommended readings as a preparation for entering the program and as a background for further research. By participating in MIT PRIMES, students can gain hands-on experience working on exciting, unsolved problems with MIT researchers and expand their knowledge and skills in these areas.

The Summer Academy for Math and Science (SAMS) is a program that provides opportunities for underrepresented high school students to explore STEM fields. The program is designed to deepen students’ understanding of STEM through traditional classroom instruction, hands-on projects, and sustained engagement with faculty and staff mentors. 

SAMS Scholars are taught by renowned faculty and staff who are deeply committed to their success. They also have the opportunity to collaborate and develop meaningful relationships with peers from across the country. Through SAMS and other outreach initiatives, the program aims to develop a diverse and supportive community of STEM Scholars interested in attending top-tier universities.

The program consists of two parts: Part one is a virtual jumpstart that will occur prior to the start of the residential program. This will focus on skill-building that will be needed for the in-person program. Part two is a 5-week in-person Pre-College program where students will move into the residence halls and attend full days of courses and meetings. The academic portion of the program will conclude with a symposium, and students will move out of the residence halls at the end of the program. 

SAMS is a fully funded, merit-based program, and there is no cost for scholars to participate. To be eligible for the program, students must be at least 16 years old, a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, and a junior in high school at the time of application submission. Scholars are expected to participate fully for the duration of the program and cannot participate in any other programs if selected for SAMS.

Virtual Research Opportunities

3. University of Illinois – High School Summer Research Program

The High School Summer STEM research program invites current 9th-11th graders from Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Iowa, or Wisconsin to apply for an authentic six-week STEMM research experience at a world-class research university. Participants will be matched with another student, and in some cases, a teacher from their school. 

The program aims to provide hands-on experience in various STEMM fields, including cancer immunology, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, physics, quantum mechanics, bioengineering, and electrical engineering.

Participants will work with established researchers in engineering, computer science, and medicine and attend weekly seminars on topics such as college admission processes and support available, communicating scientifically, and preparing research posters etc. Students will also interact with faculty, post-doctoral researchers, graduate students, undergraduate students, and local high school teachers.

Participants will showcase their research with a research poster and symposium at the end of the program. They should plan for 30-35 hours per week of research and professional development time, with a majority of activities taking place on the University of Illinois campus. 

The program covers some transportation/parking expenses, meals, and a monetary award.

High school teachers play an essential role in the program, with some research projects requiring a teacher to be a co-researcher, and others having a teacher mentor who checks in weekly with the students to discuss their research progress and address any issues or challenges. 

Teachers and students do not need to come from the same school, and interested individuals should apply regardless of whether they can recruit others from their school to apply.

The program also invites research faculty, staff, and graduate student researchers affiliated with The Grainger College of Engineering and the Carle Illinois College of Medicine to propose a high school research project for consideration. The proposals will be mentored by POETS YS, GEnYuS, or SpHERES research teams, which will guide two high school juniors/seniors from limited understanding to completion of a related project of their own and poster presentation explaining their research.

In summary, the High School Summer STEM research program provides high school students with an opportunity to engage in authentic STEMM research and develop professional and college-ready skills. Participants work with established researchers, attend weekly seminars, and showcase their research at the end of the program. 

The program aims to provide hands-on experience and build confidence in students as scientists and engineers.

4. Simons Summer Research Program

The Simons Summer Research Program is a highly selective program that offers high school students the opportunity to conduct hands-on research with Stony Brook faculty mentors. Founded in 1984, the program attracts applicants from all over the country, with Simons Fellows being paired with a faculty mentor, joining a research group or team, and taking responsibility for a project. Students are encouraged to demonstrate independence, creativity, and an aptitude for hands-on work, with a strong interest in science. The program takes place during the summer before the student’s senior year of high school, with students participating in the program from June 26, 2023 to August 11, 2023.

In addition to working on their research project, Simons Fellows attend weekly faculty research talks, special workshops, tours, and events. At the closing poster symposium, students present their research project through a written research abstract and a research poster. Participants receive a stipend award.

The Simons Summer Research Program is supported by the Simons Foundation and is open to US citizens and/or permanent residents who are at least 16 years of age by the start of the program. The program is an opportunity for high school students interested in science to learn valuable techniques, experience life at a major research university, and develop independence, creativity, and an aptitude for hands-on work. The program aims to give students a glimpse into the world of scientific research and inspire them to pursue careers in science.

Students preparing a research paper

5. EnergyMag Internship

EnergyMag is offering virtual internships for high school and college students interested in increasing the share of renewable energy in the world and gaining work experience in the energy storage industry. 

The internships aim to provide students with research and analysis skills that will be valuable for their future professional lives. The virtual internship allows students to complete their internship hours virtually, providing flexibility to fit the experience into their busy personal and professional lives. Additionally, virtual interns enjoy the unique rewards of learning from experts regardless of their geographic location and strengthening their information and computer skills. 

The internships are strong resume boosters for employers, graduate college programs, and undergraduate programs. 

EnergyMag offers half-time and quarter-time virtual internships. Half-time internships are available in the summer for two to eight weeks, with interns expected to work approximately 20 hours per week. Quarter-time internships are available all year round for one to nine months, with interns expected to work approximately eight hours per week. The internships are unpaid, and interns work from home while maintaining daily electronic contact with EnergyMag and their mentor. 

Depending on the student’s graduation date, academic record, and experience, interns will be asked to research and analyze a specific company, technology, or market. The intern will be mentored, briefed, supervised, and assisted in producing a draft analysis report. If the report is publishable, EnergyMag will give the intern an internship Letter of Accomplishment. 

The application process for college and high school internships requires an application explaining why EnergyMag should grant an internship, a Skype or voice interview, and a writing sample upon request. College interns are also required to provide their academic record, and high school interns should have at least one honors science or English class with a GPA above 3.25. 

EnergyMag believes that internships provide the opportunity for students to learn on-the-job skills that are not easy to acquire at school but will make a big difference in their future professional success, such as learning how to research a scientific or business issue, approach strangers with positions of authority in a friendly and professional manner, analyze and synthesize information from multiple sources, and communicate professionally in writing.

The blog highlights five virtual research opportunities for high school students, providing hands-on experience and research projects in various STEM fields such as mathematics, computer science, physics, neuroscience, and engineering. These virtual research opportunities aim to provide students with a deeper understanding of STEM and develop the necessary skills to succeed in academic and professional careers. Furthermore, these programs help expand knowledge and work on unsolved problems with established researchers from top-tier universities.

Virtual research opportunities for high school students provide a flexible and accessible way to gain valuable experience and knowledge from the comfort of their own homes. These programs aim to foster the intellectual growth and development of high school and middle school students, and inspire them to pursue their interests in these fields.

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How to Publish a Research Paper In High School: 18 Journals and Conferences to Consider

research topics for junior high school students

By Alex Yang

Graduate student at Southern Methodist University

9 minute read

So you've been working super hard writing a research paper , and you’ve finally finished. Congrats! It’s a very impressive accolade already, but there’s a way to take it a level further. As we’ve talked about before in our Polygence blog, “ Showcasing your work and sharing it with the world is the intellectual version of ‘pics or it didn’t happen.’ ” Of course, there are lot of different ways to showcase your work , from creating a Youtube video to making a podcast. But one of the most popular ways to showcase your research is to publish your research. Publishing your research can take the great work you’ve already done and add credibility to it, and will make a stronger impression than unpublished research. Further, the process of having your work reviewed by advanced degree researchers can be a valuable experience in itself. You can receive feedback from experts and learn how to improve upon the work you’ve already done.

Before we dive into the various journals and conferences to publish your work, let’s distinguish between the various publishing options that you have as a high schooler, as there are some nuances. Quick disclaimer: this article focuses on journals and conferences as ways to showcase your work. There are also competitions where you can submit your work, and we have written guides on competing in premier competitions like Regeneron STS and competing in Regeneron ISEF . 

Publishing Options for High School Students

Peer-reviewed journals.

This is rather self-explanatory, but these journals go through the peer review process, where author(s) submit their work to the journal, and the journal's editors send the work to a group of independent experts (typically grad students or other scientists with advanced degrees) in the same field or discipline. These experts are peer reviewers, who evaluate the work based on a set of predetermined criteria, including the quality of the research, the validity of the methodology, the accuracy of the data, and the originality of the findings. The peer reviewers may suggest revisions or leave comments, but ultimately the editors will decide which suggestions to give to the student. 

Once you’ve received suggestions, you have the opportunity to make revisions before submitting your final product back to the journal. The editor then decides whether or not your work is published.

Non-Peer-Reviewed Journals

These are just journals that do not undergo a review process. In general, peer-reviewed journals may be seen as more credible and prestigious. However, non-peer-reviewed journals may make it easier and faster to publish your work, which can be helpful if you are pressed for time and applying to colleges soon .

Pre Print Archives

Preprint archives or servers are online repositories where student researchers can upload and share their research papers without undergoing any review process. Preprints allow students to share their findings quickly and get feedback from the scientific community, which can help improve the research while you’re waiting to hear back from journals, which typically have longer timelines and can take up to several months to publish research. Sharing your work in a preprint archive does not prohibit you from, or interfere with submitting the same work to a journal afterwards.

Research Conferences

Prefer to present your research in a presentation or verbal format? Conferences can be a great way to “publish” your research, showcase your public speaking skills, speak directly to your audience, and network with other researchers in your field. 

Student-led Journals vs Graduate Student / Professor-led Journals 

Some student-led journals may have peer-review, but the actual people peer-reviewing your work may be high school students. Other journals will have graduate students, PhD students, or even faculty reviewing your work. As you can imagine, there are tradeoffs to either option. With an advanced degree student reviewing your work, you can likely expect better and more accurate feedback. Plus, it’s cool to have an expert look over your work! However, this may also mean that the journal is more selective, whereas student-led journals may be easier to publish in. Nonetheless, getting feedback from anyone who’s knowledgeable can be a great way to polish your research and writing.

Strategy for Submitting to Multiple Journals

Ultimately, your paper can only be published in one peer-reviewed journal. Submitting the same paper to multiple peer-reviewed journals at the same time is not allowed, and doing so may impact its publication at any peer-reviewed journal. If your work is not accepted at one journal, however, then you are free to submit that work to your next choice and so on. Therefore, it is best to submit to journals with a strategy in mind. Consider: what journal do I ideally want to be published in? What are some back-ups if I don’t get published in my ideal journal? Preprints, like arXiv and the Research Archive of Rising Scholars, are possible places to submit your work in advance of seeking peer-reviewed publication. These are places to “stake your claim” in a research area and get feedback from the community prior to submitting your paper to its final home in a peer-reviewed journal. You can submit your work to a preprint prior to submitting at a peer-reviewed journal. However, bioRxiv, a reputable preprint server, recommends on their website that a preprint only be posted on one server, so that’s something to keep in mind as well.

Citation and Paper Formats

All of the journals listed below have specific ways that they’d like you to cite your sources, varying from styles like MLA to APA, and it’s important that you double-check the journal’s requirements for citations, titling your paper, writing your abstract, etc. Most journal websites have very detailed guides for how they want you to format your paper, so follow those closely to avoid having to wait to hear back and then resubmit your paper. If you’re looking for more guidance on citations and bibliographies check out our blog post!

18 Journals and Conferences to Publish Your Research as a High Schooler

Now that we’ve distinguished the differences between certain journals and conferences, let’s jump into some of our favorite ones. We’ve divided up our selections based on prestige and reliability, and we’ve made these selections using our experience with helping Polygence students showcase their research .

Most Prestigious Journals

Concord review.

Cost: $70 to Submit and $200 Publication Cost (if accepted)

Deadline: Fixed Deadlines in Feb 1 (Summer Issue), May 1 (Fall), August 1 (Winter), and November 1 (Spring)

Subject area: History / Social Sciences

Type of research: All types of academic articles

The Concord Review is a quarterly journal that publishes exceptional essays written by high school students on historical topics. The journal has been around since 1987 and has a great reputation, with many student winners going to great universities. Further, if your paper is published, your essays will be sent to subscribers and teachers all around the world, which is an incredible achievement.

Papers submitted tend to be around 8,000 words, so there is definitely a lot of writing involved, and the Concord Review themselves say that they are very selective, publishing only about 5% of the essays they receive.

We’ve posted our complete guide on publishing in the Concord Review here.

Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI)

Deadline: Rolling

Subject area: STEM 

Type of research: Original hypothesis-driven scientific research

JEI is an open-access publication that features scientific research papers written by middle and high school students in the fields of biological and physical sciences. The journal includes a comprehensive peer-review process, where graduate students and other professional scientists with advanced degrees will review the manuscripts and provide suggestions to improve both the project and manuscript itself. You can expect to receive feedback in 6-8 weeks.

This should be the go-to option for students that are doing hypothesis-driven, original research or research that involves original analyses of existing data (meta-analysis, analyzing publicly available datasets, etc.). This is not an appropriate fit for students writing literature reviews. Finally, a mentor or parent must submit on behalf of the student.

We’ve had many Polygence students successfully submit to JEI. Check out Hana’s research on invasive species and their effects in drought times.

STEM Fellowship Journal (SFJ)

Cost: $400 publication fee

Subject area: All Scientific Disciplines

Type of research: Conference Proceedings, Review Articles, Viewpoint Articles, Original Research

SFJ is a peer-reviewed journal published by Canadian Science Publishing that serves as a platform for scholarly research conducted by high school and university students in the STEM fields. Peer review is conducted by undergraduate, graduate student, and professional reviewers.

Depending on the kind of research article you choose to submit, SFJ provides very specific guidelines on what to include and word limits.

Other Great Journal Options

National high school journal of science (nhsjs).

Cost: $250 for publication 

Deadline: Rolling 

Subject area: All science disciplines 

Type of research: Original research, literature review

NHSJS is a journal peer reviewed by high schoolers from around the world, with an advisory board of adult academics. Topics are STEM related, and submission types can vary from original research papers to shorter articles.

Curieux Academic Journal

Cost: $185-215

Subject area: Engineering, Humanities, and Natural Science, Mathematics, and Social Science

Type of research: Including but not limited to research papers, review articles, and humanity/social science pieces.

Curieux Academic Journal is a non-profit run by students and was founded in 2017 to publish outstanding research by high school and middle school students. Curieux publishes one issue per month (twelve per year), so there are many opportunities to get your research published. 

The Young Scientists Journal 

Deadline: December

Subject area: Sciences

Type of research: Original research, literature review, blog post

The Young Scientists Journal , while a popular option for students previously, has paused submissions to process a backlog. The journal is an international peer-reviewed journal run by students, and creates print issues twice a year. 

The journal has also been around for a decade and has a clear track record of producing alumni who go on to work in STEM.

Here’s an example of research submitted by Polygence student Ryan to the journal.

Journal of Research High School (JRHS)

Subject area: Any academic subject including the sciences and humanities

Type of research: Original research and significant literature reviews.

JRHS is an online research journal edited by volunteer professional scientists, researchers, teachers, and professors. JRHS accepts original research and significant literature reviews in Engineering, Humanities, Natural Science, Math, and Social Sciences.

From our experience working with our students to help publish their research, this journal is currently operating with a 15-20 week turnaround time for review. This is a bit on the longer side, so be mindful of this turnaround time if you’re looking to get your work published soon.

Youth Medical Journal

Deadline: March (currently closed)

Subject area: Medical or scientific topics

Type of research: Original research, review article, blog post, magazine article

The Youth Medical Journal is an international, student-run team of 40 students looking to share medical research.

We’ve found that this journal is a good entry point for students new to research papers, but when submissions are busy, in the past they have paused submissions. 

Journal of High School Science (JHSS)

Subject area: All topics

Type of research: Original research, literature review, technical notes, opinion pieces

This peer-reviewed STEAM journal publishes quarterly, with advanced degree doctors who sit on the journal’s editorial board. In addition to typical STEM subjects, the journal also accepts manuscripts related to music and theater, which is explicitly stated on their website.

Due to the current large volume of submissions, the review process takes a minimum of 4 weeks from the time of submission.

Whitman Journal of Psychology

Subject area: Psychology

Type of research: Original research, podcasts

The WWJOP is a publication run entirely by students, where research and literature reviews in the field of psychology are recognized. The journal is run out of a high school with a teacher supervisor and student staff.

The WWJOP uniquely also accepts podcast submissions, so if that’s your preferred format for showcasing your work, then this could be the journal for you!

Cost: $180 submission fee

Subject area: Humanities

Type of research: Essay submission

The Schola is a peer-reviewed quarterly journal that showcases essays on various humanities and social sciences topics authored by high school students worldwide. They feature a diverse range of subjects such as philosophy, history, art history, English, economics, public policy, and sociology.

Editors at Schola are academics who teach and do research in the humanities and social sciences

Critical Debates in Humanities, Science and Global Justice

Cost: $10 author fee

Subject area: Ethics and frontiers of science, Biology and ecosystems, Technology and Innovation, Medical research and disease, Peace and civil society, Global citizenship, identity and democracy, Structural violence and society, Psychology, Education, AI, Sociology, Computer Science, Neuroscience, Cultural politics, Politics and Justice, Computer science and math as related to policy, Public policy, Human rights, Language, Identity and Culture, Art and activism

Critical Debates is an international academic journal for critical discourse in humanities, science and contemporary global issues for emerging young scholars

International Youth Neuroscience Association Journal

Subject area: Neuroscience

Type of research: Research papers

Although this student peer-reviewed journal is not currently accepting submissions, we’ve had students recently publish here. 

Here’s an example of Nevenka’s research that was published in the November 2022 issue of the journal.

Preprint Archives to Share Your Work In

Subject area: STEM, Quantitative Finance, Economics

arXiv is an open access archive supported by Cornell University, where more than 2 million scholarly articles in a wide variety of topics have been compiled. arXiv articles are not peer-reviewed, so you will not receive any feedback on your work from experts. However, your article does go through a moderation process where your work is classified into a topic area and checked for scholarly value. This process is rather quick however and according to arXiv you can expect your article to be available on the website in about 6 hours. 

Although there’s no peer review process, that means the submission standards are not as rigorous and you can get your article posted very quickly, so submitting to arXiv or other preprint archives can be something you do before trying to get published in a journal.

One slight inconvenience of submitting to arXiv is that you must be endorsed by a current arXiv author, which can typically be a mentor or teacher or professor that you have. Here’s an example of a Polygence student submitting their work to arXiv, with Albert’s research on Hamiltonian Cycles.

Subject area: Biology

Type of research: Original research

bioRxiv is a preprint server for biology research, where again the research is not peer-reviewed but undergoes a check to make sure that the material is relevant and appropriate.

bioRxiv has a bit of a longer posting time, taking around 48 hours, but that’s still very quick. bioRxiv also allows for you to submit revised versions of your research if you decide to make changes.

Research Archive of Rising Scholars (RARS)

Subject area: STEM and Humanities

Type of research: Original research, review articles, poems, short stories, scripts

Research Archive of Rising Scholars is Polygence’s own preprint server! We were inspired by arXiv so we created a repository for articles and other creative submissions in STEM and the Humanities.

We launched RARS in 2022 and we’re excited to offer a space for budding scholars as they look to publish their work in journals. Compared to other preprint archives, RARS also accepts a wider range of submission types, including poems, short stories, and scripts.

Conferences to Participate In

Symposium of rising scholars.

Deadline: Twice a year - February and July

Polygence’s very own Symposium of Rising Scholars is a bi-annual academic conference where students present and share their research with their peers and experts. The Symposium also includes a College Admissions Panel and Keynote Speech. In our 8th edition of the Symposium this past March, we had 60 students presenting live, approximately 70 students presenting asynchronously, and over 100 audience members. The keynote speaker was Chang-rae Lee, award-winning novelist and professor at Stanford University.

We’re looking to have our 9th Symposium in Fall of 2023, and you can express your interest now. If you’re interested to see what our Polygence scholars have presented in the past for the Symposium, you can check out their scholar pages here.

Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS)

Deadline: Typically in November, so for 2024’s competition look to submit in Fall 2023

Subject area: STEM topics

JSHS is a Department of Defense sponsored program and competition that consists of first submitting a written report of your research. If your submission is selected, you’ll be able to participate in the regional symposium, where you can present in oral format or poster format. A select group from the regional symposium will then qualify for the national symposium.

One of the great things about JSHS compared to the journals mentioned above is that you’re allowed to work in teams and you don’t have to be a solo author. This can make the experience more fun for you and your teammates, and allow you to combine your strengths for your submission.

Related Content:

Top 8 Business Journals to Publish Your Research

Why Teens Should Attend the National Student Leadership Conference (NSLC)

How to Brainstorm Your Way to Perfect Research Topic Ideas

Top 20 Most Competitive Summer Programs for High School Students

Research Opportunities for High School Students

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How to Publish Research as a High Schooler

  • Written by Kevin Krebs
  • Last Updated on June 27, 2024

research topics for junior high school students

If you’re a high school student passionate about a particular subject, undertaking an academic research project is one of the best ways to explore your interests, build critical thinking skills, and showcase your academic abilities beyond the classroom. Getting your research published is an extra step that both validates your work and signals to colleges that you’re ready to take on more advanced projects. 

Publishing as a high schooler might seem daunting, but there are many publications dedicated to rewarding and showcasing outstanding work from young academic researchers. In this blog post, we’ll explore how to publish research as a high schooler and highlight 10 research journals that publish high school students.

What it Means to Publish Research as a High Schooler

Publishing your research means that you have gone through a rigorous, peer-reviewed process that has analyzed, critiqued, and accepted your research. Scientific publications are gatekeepers to the broader world. If a research piece is not published by a journal, it means that it has not yet passed a rigorous, external analysis of the research. 

Why Publish in High School?

Publishing your research offers several benefits, including:

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Recognition and Validation

Having your work published means validation of your work from the academic community.

Skill Development

The publishing process sharpens key academic and professional skills like research, writing, and communication.

College Applications

A published paper can significantly enhance your college applications , setting you apart from other applicants.

Contribution to Knowledge

Your research could contribute valuable insights to your field of interest.

research topics for junior high school students

While publishing your research may be lengthy and time-intensive, the process can be simplified to four steps:

1. Select the right journal.

The first step is to research academic journals that accept submissions from high school students. Some journals have dedicated sections for work by high schoolers while others only publish research from contributors under the age of 18. When selecting a journal, pick one (or several) that align with your research topic and pay close attention to details like word requirements and special criteria.

2. Prepare your paper for submission.

Read your chosen journal’s submission guidelines and format your paper accordingly. This often requires organizing your research into sections and preparing an abstract and/or cover letter.

3. Submit your paper.

Most journals accept submissions online. Before submitting your research, double-check that all required materials are included, correctly formatted, free from errors, and uploaded according to that journal’s specific guidelines. 

4. Respond to feedback and revise.

Once your research is peer-reviewed, you should expect to receive feedback. The journal may ask questions, seek additional information, or request revisions to your paper. After making necessary revisions, resubmit your paper according to the instructions. 

10 Research Journals that Publish High School Students 

research topics for junior high school students

Below is a list of 10 research journals that publish high school research on a variety of academic subjects:

1. Open Journal of Business and Management (OJBM)

The OJBM is an international journal dedicated to the latest advancement in the study of business and management. The goal is to platform academics all over the world to promote, share, and discuss issues and developments related to business and management. While most of the contributions come from more experienced researchers, OJBM is one of the few journals to accept high school research projects in business and management.

Subjects: Economics and Business 

Estimated Acceptance Rate: 15-20% (for high schoolers) 

2. Columbia Junior Science Research Journal

The Columbia Junior Science Research Journal is a highly prestigious research journal for high school students interested in the natural sciences, physical sciences, engineering, and social sciences. CJSJ originated from the Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal and is run by the same editorial staff. It promotes the development of young researchers versed in technical and communication skills, facets encoded into the DNA of Columbia University.

Subjects: Natural Sciences, Physical Sciences, Social Sciences, and Engineering

Estimated Acceptance Rate: 3% 

3. The Young Researcher

The Young Researcher is a peer-reviewed journal edited by secondary school students working closely with scholars and active researchers at universities and in the community. The journal’s mission is to provide a larger audience for the original academic research of high schoolers, a forum for peer-review, and a community of young researchers. In addition, the journal strives to advance the quality of academic writing in secondary schools. 

Subjects: Social Sciences, Humanities, and Physical Sciences

Estimated Acceptance rate: 65%

4. The Schola

The Schola is a journal of humanities and social sciences essays contributed by high school students all over the world. They accept essays written on topics in philosophy, history, art history, literature, politics, public policy, and sociology. If your essay is selected, The Schola gives you the full academic publishing experience—presenting research findings to a publisher, receiving editorial feedback, and editing the manuscript. Each student has a personalized editorial experience through the process.

Subjects: Humanities 

Acceptance Rate: They do not disclose their acceptance rate, but it’s safe to say this is a rigorous and highly selective journal.

5. The Concord Review

The Concord Review is a quarterly journal publishing history essays and the most prestigious journal in the country for high school students. Its prestige comes from its high level of selectivity, quality of research, and long history of contributors going on to top universities. The quality of writing for the published papers is also very high, with the average length of papers published at 9000 words (the longest was 21,000!). Only eleven students are chosen worldwide for each issue.

Subject: History 

Estimated Acceptance Rate: < 5 %

6. Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI)

The Journal of Emerging Investigators is a peer-reviewed journal for middle and high school students, focusing on the biological and physical sciences. Under the guidance of a teacher or advisor, JEI gives students the opportunity to gain feedback on original research and publish their work in a peer-reviewed journal. JEI accepts work that comes from classroom-based projects, science fair projects, or other forms of mentor-supervised research. While the JEI website heavily promotes STEM research, the journal also accepts research from other disciplines, as long as it is original and hypothesis-driven.

Subject area: STEM, but open non-STEM

Estimated acceptance rate: 70-75%

7. Young Scientist Journal

The Young Science Journal is a product of the Vanderbilt Center for Science Outreach, a group that works in the field of scientific and technological literacy through unique partnerships between Vanderbilt University scientists, K-12 educators and students, and the local and global science community. Open to students aged 12 to 20, this journal covers science, engineering, and mathematics, offering a platform for young researchers worldwide.

Subjects: STEM

Estimated Acceptance Rate: 10-15%

8. Walt Whitman Journal of Psychology (WWJOP)

The Walt Whitman Journal of Psychology is a nationally recognized psychology journal run by high-school students for high-school students. The WWJOP is published bi-annually and electronically and reaches hundreds of schools and psychology students around the world. It is one of the few journals at this level to offer a subject specialization in the field of psychology. 

Subject: Psychology 

Estimated acceptance rate: 20-30%

9. Journal of Research High School (JRHS)

The Journal of Research High School is an open-access online research journal that aims at publishing academic work prepared exclusively by high school researchers. It is managed by a team of volunteer professional scientists, researchers, teachers, and professors. JRHS serves as a stepping-stone for high school authors to become experienced researchers with improved skills in the early stage of their academic life. The organization also has a platform where students can interact with other peers while at the same time gaining access to their academic works.

Subject: Any academic subject including the Sciences and Humanities 

Estimated Acceptance Rate: 30%

10. Curieux Academic Journal

The Curieux Academic Journal is a youth-led nonprofit founded in 2017 to publish research by high school and middle school students. They currently operate in California but have editors from across the nation. They are open to submissions from any academic subject, including the sciences and humanities, and encourage all forms of academic writing including but not limited to research papers, review articles, and humanity/social science pieces. Curieux works well as a backup publication for students pursuing research in the social sciences and humanities since they publish twelve issues per year and have a relatively higher acceptance rate. 

Subjects: Engineering, Humanities, Natural Science, Mathematics, and Social Science 

Estimated Acceptance Rate: 60-70%

Publishing research as a high school student is more than an academic accomplishment; it’s a formative experience that lays the groundwork for future success. Publishing offers a platform to share your discoveries, build your skills, and contribute to your field of interest in a meaningful way. Students who undertake this challenge learn more about their chosen topic, but also about perseverance, critical feedback, and the satisfaction of contributing knowledge to the world. The path to publication is demanding, but by following this guide and exploring the many publications open to high school students, you’ll discover that the rewards are worth it.

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10 Summer Research Programs for Middle School Students

If you’re a middle schooler interested in research and exploring concepts beyond yout school curriculum this summer, a summer research program should definitely be on your radar! These programs offer hands-on research experience in various fields such as biology, physics, technology, environmental science, and more.  

Participating in a research program will allow you to conduct experiments, collaborate on projects under the guidance of experts, and mingle with like-minded peers. Additionally, gaining practical research experience as early as middle school can boost your profile for college applications and help develop your critical thinking and problem-solving skills, enhancing your future academic and career prospects.

Such experiences will also allow you to explore potential career paths in your chosen field and help you structure your extracurriculars in high school accordingly.  

It can be a bit challenging to find the program that best fits your needs. To help you get started, we’ve compiled a list of some of the best summer research programs for middle school students!

1. The Lawrence at U.C. Berkeley - Summer Teen Research Programs  

Location:  U.C. Berkeley Campus, CA

Cost:  Tuition fee is $1,350 and the optional residential add-on cost is $1,150; the program offers a subsidized price for families in need with the tuition and residential fee reduced to $1,215 and $1,035 respectively. The tuition fee covers meals on campus; financial aid  is also available.

Application Deadline: Applications typically close in May.

Dates:  June 24 to June 28, 2024

Eligibility:  Rising 7th–9th graders can apply.

The Lawrence Hall of Science at U.C. Berkeley is a unique research opportunity for middle school students looking to dive into the wonders of STEM firsthand! This one-week research program offers immersive experiences, hands-on experiments, and exciting campus tours designed to spark curiosity and ignite a passion for STEM. As a participant in this research program, you’ll get to experience engaging lab sessions, interactions with faculty and students, and exposure to diverse STEM career paths—the Lawrence program provides a dynamic learning environment for you to refine your technical skills. 

There are four programs available for middle school students with all programs including a research component in the curriculum: 

Designing and Engineering Bridges

Body Systems and Biomedical Innovations

Coding and Engineering Nano-Satellites

Solar Energy and Electrical Engineering

By participating in this program, you’ll not only acquire knowledge but also gain invaluable skills across a spectrum of STEM areas. Each of these programs can equip you with a deeper understanding of science and tangible experiences to enrich your future college and career journey significantly.

2. Lumiere Junior Explorer Program

Location: Virtual

Cost:  $1990 (Financial aid is available)

Application Deadline: Multiple deadlines throughout the year. The upcoming summer cohort deadline is June 26, 2024. 

Dates:  The upcoming Summer 2024 cohort starts on July 15 and runs for 8 weeks.

Eligibility:  Students in grades 6–8 can apply.

The Lumiere Junior Explorer Program is an 8-week opportunity for middle school students to work one-on-one with a mentor, explore their academic interests, and build a project they are passionate about.  Our mentors are scholars from top research universities, such as Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Yale, Duke, and LSE. 

During this program, spanning weeks 1 to 4, you will delve into four distinct topics within your selected track. In weeks 5 and 6, the focus intensifies as you embark on a deep dive into one specific topic area, and finally, weeks 7 to 8 are dedicated to project implementation, where you will receive guidance and support from your mentor as you bring your project to life.

You can find the   application form here . 

Location:  Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

Cost:  $75 application fee; $895 for the commuter program (inclusive of lunch); $1,995 for the residential program (only for Session 2). Need-based scholarships  are available.

Application Deadline:  Applications typically close in May.

Dates:  Session 1: July 8 to July 12, 2024 | Session 2: July 15 to July 19, 2024

Eligibility:  Students in grades 7 or 8 can apply. Students must also submit test scores  with their MST application.

The Mathematics, Science, and Technology program at Michigan State University (MST@MSU) is a one-week summer program for academically inclined middle school students interested in STEM. The program offers both commuter and residential programs where you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the subjects and get to participate in hands-on interdisciplinary research using tools of mathematics, science, and technology. You can check out the track options for both sessions here .  

The program covers various research topics such as: composing an original piece of music with and without technology, studying the basic techniques of mathematical proof and the logic behind them, or learning about whole-body integrative physiology (including how to test and document your findings).  The program can be a deeply enriching experience for you as it aims to challenge the intellectual abilities of talented middle schoolers with rigorous and intensive coursework — further advancing your knowledge and interest in STEM subjects.

4. I-STEM at Stony Brook University - Science Exploration Program

Location:  Stony Brook University, Long Island, NYC

Cost:  $650 program fee; financial aid is available.

Application Deadline: Applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Dates:  July 15 to 25, 2024

Eligibility:  Students entering grades 7–9 in September 2024 can apply.

The Stony Brook University Science Exploration Program is a prestigious program for middle schoolers with a passion for science and research. This academic program aims to complement your science curriculum at school and stimulate your thinking, research, and experimentation.  The program is centered around laboratory work, but it will also include activities such as reading, computer research, writing, and group projects.

Seventh graders  will hone their laboratory skills through experiments in physics, chemistry, microbiology, and ecology. 

Eighth graders  will delve into biology, chemistry, biotechnology, and environmental chemistry, using case studies to explore complex concepts such as Cholera and Bioremediation, all within the framework of homeostasis and environmental interactions. 

Ninth graders  will focus on biology and research skills, working in groups to investigate botany, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology. 

As only 24 students per grade level are accepted into the program, students are expected to be curious and hardworking. These experiences will introduce and reinforce skills and concepts that will prepare you for high school science coursework. This program will also help develop your problem-solving skills by working through instructions both in a group and independently.

5. Science of Smart Cities (SoSC) at New York University (NYU)

Location:  NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Brooklyn, NY

Cost:  Free for all accepted participants.

Application Deadline: Applications typically close in April.

Dates:  July 8 to August 2, 2024

Eligibility: Students who are NYC residents and 12 years old by the start of the program but not older than 14 can apply.

The Science of Smart Cities (SoSC) is a comprehensive three-week program on utilizing computer science, engineering, and technology to make cities more safe and sustainable. T hrough interactive activities, you’ll get to delve into topics like coding, physical sciences, and urban planning. You will also learn how science and engineering address real-world problems with innovative solutions, including the use of microcontrollers, sensors, circuitry, and electronics.

Mentored by NYU School of Engineering students, you’ll get to build smart city models while incorporating the various STEM concepts you’ve learned. The program ends with a final presentation, where you will present your creative solutions and projects to experts and the public.  The SoSC can help you enhance STEM skills and awareness, preparing you for future roles in city planning and technology. 

6. Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering’s SEE: Summer Engineering Experience

Location: Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering, Pittsburgh, PA

Cost:  Free for all accepted participants; housing/transportation is not covered.

Application Deadline:  Applications are accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Dates:  June 24 to 28, 2024 

Eligibility: Rising 8th and 9th graders can apply. 

The Summer Engineering Experience (SEE) is a week-long summer experience meant to bring various engineering concepts to rising 8th and 9th graders. SEE aims to give students hands-on experience in different forms of engineering. In addition to educational presentations throughout the week, you will have to complete two projects primarily utilizing items readily available in your household. 

For the first session, the first project is a structured assignment that will be completed by the entire group throughout the week. The second project will be completed individually within smaller groups, allowing for more unique and innovative ideas. The program will help you hone your skills in problem-solving, critical thinking, and design concepts.  It will also give you practical experience in developing innovative and creative solutions for real-world problems.

7. CEISMC Summer P.E.A.K.S at Georgia Tech

Location:  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

Cost:  $400 to $650 per participant; Needs-based scholarships of up to 75% are available.

Application Deadline:  The deadline varies depending on the program.

Dates:  Varies depending on the program; typically from June to July.

Eligibility:  Rising 6th–8th graders can apply.

CEISMC Summer P.E.A.K.S. (Programs for Enrichment and Accelerated Knowledge in STEAM) are one- to two-week residential programs designed to increase Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics (STEAM) knowledge through various educational activities. The programs curated for middle school students give students a chance to enhance learning during the summer through hands-on activities at Georgia Tech! Summer P.E.A.K.S. covers topics like coding, 3D game design, engineering basics, data science, engineering, AI, psychology, film production, and more. You can register for the available courses here .

Programs are taught by a mixture of Georgia Tech faculty, staff, students, and area science and math teachers. By participating in this program, you can choose from a variety of courses based on your interest — you can learn to code, investigate energy generation, follow industrial engineers, and even study film production! You can check out an in-depth review of the CEISMC Summer P.E.A.K.S. here .

8. Sally Ride Science Academy Summer Program @ UC San Diego

Location: University of California, San Diego, CA; some programs are offered virtually.

Cost:  Courses range from $175 to $450; Financial aid is available.

Application Deadline: Applications typically close in May for all courses.

Dates:  4-day sessions are held every week between July 8 and August 2, 2024; available courses differ from week to week; students can choose only one course per week..

Eligibility: Open to all middle and high school students.

The Sally Ride Science Academy Summer Program provides engaging workshops spanning various topics. From core STEM areas such as computer science, robotics, engineering, and biology, to specific fields like filmmaking, business, financial literacy, or gemology. During the program, you get hands-on experience by participating in workshops such as A Dose of Pharmacreations , Adventures Under the Sea , Around the World in Business , Filmmaking , and  more.

Guided by experienced educators and scientists, the interactive sessions aim to foster your academic interests, enhance your critical thinking abilities, and encourage teamwork through projects.  Both in-person and online sessions of three hours each are available depending on your chosen course. Faculty from the university teach the different courses offered, giving you a chance to learn first-hand from college professors, sample undergraduate life, and make connections with them. The program allows you to attend multiple courses during the summer and gain experience in a variety of fields.  You can read our in-depth review of the Sally Ride Science Academy Summer Program here .

9. NYU’s Sounds of New York City (SONYC)

Application Deadline:  Applications typically close in April.

Dates:  July 8 to August 2, 2024; Orientation on June 28 via Zoom.

Eligibility:  Students who live in New York City and are age 12 by the start of the program but not older than 14 can apply.

The Sounds of New Your City (SONYC) program at NYC is an innovative platform designed to ignite and enrich students' passion for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Through a diverse curriculum crafted to explore the fields of engineering, physical and computer sciences, as well as natural phenomena such as waves and sound, SONYC fosters a profound understanding and appreciation for these disciplines.

This program is all about active engagement and exploration where you’ll get to participate in research focusing on the intricate workings of microcontrollers, sensors, and various hardware components.  It will allow you to unravel the mysteries of circuitry, electronics, coding, and gain insights into how scientists and engineers apply fundamental principles to tackle real-world challenges.  You’ll also get to demonstrate your skills and knowledge by creating actual smart city technologies that you will present at an end-of-program expo.

10. U.C. Berkeley Coding Academy’s AI Applications

Location:  Live sessions via Zoom

Cost:  $2,695

Application Deadline: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Dates:  July 15 to August 2, 2024

Eligibility:  Students aged 12 to 18 are eligible to apply.

If you are a middle school student who wants to explore how data is used in various areas, from social media trends to environmental changes, the UC Berkeley Coding Academy is a good option for you. The AI Applications program focuses on the Python code behind AI — You will learn to classify images, detect astronomical objects, recommend movies and music, generate text, and generate images to detect deep fakes. With a focus on Deep Learning, you’ll get to build CNNs, RNNs, LLMs, GANs, and more. During the program, you’ll also get to complete several mini-projects and a special final project of your choice.

Moreover, you will receive permanent access to the Berkeley Coding Academy suite which includes over 100 4K Data Science videos, over 100 Colab Notebooks, over 100 slides, and all additional materials that students and instructors create for this class. For the advanced cohort, proficiency in Python at the level of writing functions and accessing libraries via dot notation is required. However, the beginner cohort is for students who are new to coding/Python. You can select the cohort according to your preference on the application form.

One other option — Veritas AI

Location:  Virtual

Cost:  AI Trailblazers costs $1,790 | AI Junior Fellowship costs $2,900. Need-based financial aid is available.

Application Deadline:  The upcoming Summer cohort deadline is June 23, 2024.

Dates:  The AI Trailblazers runs for a total of 25 hours over 10 weekends and the AI Junior Fellowship runs for 12 weeks. Upcoming Summer cohort dates can be found   here .

Eligibility:  

AI Trailblazers—Students in grades 6--8 can apply.

AI Junior Fellowship—High school and advanced middle school students can apply.

Veritas AI is an online program tailored for middle and high school students and founded and run by graduates from Harvard University. For middle schoolers, there are two distinct paths available. The first is the   AI Trailblazers  boot camp, where you’ll get to learn the basics of artificial intelligence and machine learning, alongside foundational Python skills.  You will engage in practical AI projects spanning fields such as medicine, finance, and autonomous vehicles under the guidance of mentors from leading universities. This option is particularly suitable for beginners. The program runs for a total of 25 hours over 10 weekends. 

Alternatively, for those who have completed the boot camp or possess prior Python experience, the   AI Junior Fellowship  can be a great opportunity. Over 12 weeks, you’ll collaborate one-on-one with a mentor to develop your own project or research paper.  This avenue offers a compelling platform to explore AI within the context of various disciplines, enabling students to exhibit their enthusiasm and skills. 

Stephen is one of the founders of Lumiere and a Harvard College graduate. He founded Lumiere as a PhD student at Harvard Business School. Lumiere is a selective research program where students work 1-1 with a research mentor to develop an independent research paper.

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31 Research Opportunities + Internships for High Schoolers in 2024

What’s covered:.

  • Research Opportunities and Internships for High School Students
  • How to Find Research Opportunities in High School
  • How Will Doing Research Impact Your College Chances?

Research drives innovation across every field of study, from natural sciences to health to history. Pursuing curiosity can impact industries, drive policy, and help us to better understand the world around us. Without curiosity and research, our society would surely stagnate. 

Contrary to popular belief, however, you don’t have to be a seasoned professional to conduct meaningful research. There are plenty of opportunities for high school students to get a head start on their future careers and contribute to substantial change. Keep reading to learn about 30 great opportunities for students looking for early chances to conduct research! 

Research Opportunities and Internships for High School Students 

1. memorial sloan kettering human oncology and pathogenesis program.

Application Deadline: February 9

Location: New York, NY

Duration: Eight weeks (June 27 – August 22)

Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) is one of the most well-known cancer centers in the world. The Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program (HOPP) at MSK hosts a Summer Student Program for students to conduct independent research projects while participating in extracurricular activities, training, and other opportunities.  

During the eight-week program, participants work with a mentor who will act as a supervisor to help them develop their research skills. Additionally, students have the opportunity to complete an independent research project that aligns with their mentor’s work. All participants will present their projects at a poster session at the end of the summer.

To participate, you must have completed at least 9th grade by June 2024, be at least 14 years old by June 27, have a 3.5 GPA in science subjects, and submit two letters of recommendation. This is a paid opportunity—participants will receive a stipend. 

2. Rockefeller University Summer Science Research Program  

Application Deadline: January 5 

Duration: Seven weeks (June 24 – August 8) 

The Rockefeller University Summer Science Research Program allows high school students to conduct real, innovative research over seven weeks through the renowned Rockefeller University, under the guidance of leading scientists. 

SSRP scholars will be able to design and conduct their own research project as part of a themed research track, which is modeled after a Rockefeller research topic and/or technique, with the help of scientist mentors from the Rockefeller community. Most of the research will be conducted in the RockEDU Laboratory—a 3,000-square-foot research space specifically dedicated to developing biomedical research skills.

Students must be at least 16 years old by the start of the program to participate.  

3. Lumiere Research Scholar Program

Application Deadline : Varies by cohort. Main summer deadlines are March 15, April 15, and May 15

Location:  Remote — you can participate in this program from anywhere in the world!

Duration: Options range from 12 weeks to 1 year

Founded by Harvard & Oxford researchers, the Lumiere Research Scholar Program is a rigorous research program tailored for high school students. The program pairs high-school students with PhD mentors to work 1-on-1 on an independent research project . At the end of the 12-week program, you’ll have written an independent research paper! You can choose research topics from subjects such as medicine, computer science, psychology, physics, economics, data science, business, engineering, biology, and international relations.

This program is designed to accommodate your schedule—you can participate in the summer, fall, winter, or spring, and the program is also conducted fully remotely. While you must be currently enrolled in high school and demonstrate high academic achievement (most students have an unweighted GPA of 3.3), no previous knowledge of your field of interest is required. The cost of the program ranges from $2,800 to $8,900, but financial aid is available.

Note that this is a selective program. Last year, over 4000 students applied for 500 spots in the program. You can find more details about the application here .

4. Research Science Institute (RSI)

Application Deadline: December 13 

Location: Cambridge, MA

Duration: Five weeks (June 23 – August 3) 

The prestigious RSI, which takes place at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) annually, brings together 100 of the world’s top high school students. The free program blends on-campus coursework with off-campus science and technology research. 

Participants complete individual research projects while receiving mentorship from experienced scientists and researchers, and present their findings through oral and written reports in a conference-style setting at the end of the program. 

5. NYU Tandon – Applied Research Innovations in Science and Engineering (ARISE)

Application Deadline: March 6

Duration: 10  weeks (June 3 – August 9)

Open to New York City high school students who will complete 10th or 11th grade in June 2024, the ARISE program provides access to college-level workshops and lab research across fields like bio, molecular, and chemical engineering, robotics, computer science, and AI.

Over the course of 10 weeks—four virtual and six in person—participants will receive guidance from graduate or postdoctoral students at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering. 

6. Simons Summer Research Program

Application Deadline: February 7

Location: Stony Brook, NY

Duration: Five weeks (July 1 – August 9) 

During Stony Brook ’s Simons Summer Research Program, high school students conduct hands-on research in areas like science, math, and engineering while working with faculty mentors. Simons Fellows have the opportunity to join real research teams and learn about laboratory equipment and techniques. They also attend weekly faculty research talks and participate in special workshops, tours, and events. 

At the closing poster symposium, students will receive a stipend for their participation. To apply, you must be at least 16 years old by the start of the program and currently be in your junior year. 

7. SPARK Summer Mentorship Program

Application Deadline: N/A

Location: Greater Seattle area

Duration: 8-10 weeks 

SPARK is a summer mentorship program that pairs high-achieving and highly motivated high schoolers with industry experts, university professors, and mentors to conduct research on customers and financial markets. The program is only open to U.S. citizens and permanent residents.  

8. MDI Biological Laboratory – Biomedical Bootcamp 2024

Application Deadline: March 18 

Location: Bar Harbor, ME

Duration: One week (July 15 – 19) 

In this bootcamp, students will receive a hands-on introduction to biomedical research at MDI Biological Laboratory. Participants will learn essential scientific skills such as experimental design and hypothesis testing, cutting-edge laboratory techniques, data analysis, bioinformatics, and scientific communication. 

During the program, scientists and bioentrepreneurs at the lab will help participants explore scientific ethics at large, as well as career paths in biomedicine, research, and entrepreneurship in Maine and beyond.

Participants must be at least 16 years old by the start of the program and must be entering their junior or senior year in September 2024, or graduating in June 2024. 

9. Boston University – Research in Science & Engineering (RISE) Internship  

Application Deadline: February 14  

Location: Boston, MA

Duration: Six weeks (June 30 – August 9)  

RISE is a six-week program for rising seniors with an interest in pursuing a major and/or career in STEM. There are a multitude of tracks available, in areas such as astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, environmental science, and neuroscience. In each track, students conduct research under the mentorship of Boston University faculty, postdoctoral fellows, or graduate students. They will also attend weekly workshops with their peers. 

10. The Wistar Institute – High School Program in Biomedical Research

Application Deadline: March 31 

Location: Philadelphia, PA

Duration: Four weeks (July 15 – August 8) 

A leading biomedical research organization, The Wistar Institute is an ideal setting for students to learn research skills. Participants will complete their own research project while being trained in a principal investigator’s laboratory. They’ll also attend seminars, receive mentorship, and deliver a final presentation about their work.

Students are expected to participate Monday through Thursday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. Absences of more than two consecutive days cannot be accommodated. Students will receive a stipend of $1,000 upon completion of the program, to compensate for commuting costs or other personal expenses accrued during the program. 

11. California Academy of Sciences – Careers in Science (CiS) Intern Program

Application Deadline: April 1, 2024

Location: San Francisco, CA

Duration: Multi-year, year-round participation (after school and on weekends)

This long term program gives San Francisco students from communities that are underrepresented in STEM the opportunity to learn about the world of science and sustainability. Students receive mentorship, develop career skills, and more—all while getting paid for their work. Students also attend workshops and conferences throughout the course of the program. 

12. NASA OSTEM Internship

Application Deadline: February 2

Location: Varies

Duration: Varies

NASA offers a variety of internships for high school students across its numerous campuses. Interns gain real-world work experience by working side by side with research scientists and engineers, which will strengthen their resume and help prepare them for their eventual careers. All participants must be at least 16 years old and enrolled in high school full time.

13. New-York Historical Society Student Historian Internship Program

Application Deadline: April 7

Duration: July 9 – August 15

Not all research is conducted in STEM subjects! Developed for students interested in history, the New-York Historical Society’s Student Historian Program gives participants the opportunity to conduct research on a history topic—2024’s theme is Our Composite Nation: Frederick Douglass’ America . During the program, participants will work with historian mentors, visit history archives around New York City, lead gallery tours, and develop their historical thinking, communication, and digital media skills.

Applicants must be entering grades 10, 11, or 12, and live in the New York City metro area. This opportunity is unpaid for most participants, but some interns with demonstrated financial need can potentially receive a stipend.

14. Adler Planetarium Summer High School Internship  

Application Deadline: March 1

Location: Chicago, IL

Duration: Six weeks (July 8 – August 14)

During this summer internship program, students will learn about the Adler Planetarium and the career opportunities within it and planetariums and museums in general, in areas ranging from Visitor Experience and Learning to Research. Students will also get the chance to see how research gets translated into a museum experience. 

15. Zuckerman Institute Brain Research Apprenticeships in New York at Columbia University (BRAINYAC)

Application Deadline: TBA for 2025 program

Duration: Eight weeks  

BRAINYAC participants receive the rare opportunity to work on research in a lab at Columbia University , one of the most prestigious institutions in the world, as high school students, which results in a stronger, more comprehensive understanding of how scientific discovery happens. They connect with real scientists, acquire essential research and laboratory skills, and learn about advances in neuroscience research. 

In order to apply, you must be in 10th or 11th grade and must be nominated by one of the program’s partners—S-PREP, Lang Youth Medical, Double Discovery Center, Columbia Secondary School, or BioBus.  

16. Brookfield Zoo King Conservation Science Scholars Program

Application Deadline: Rolling admission 

Location: Brookfield, IL

Duration: N/A

Interactive workshops, fun activities, research, and community-based projects are at the core of this exciting internship. It’s an excellent opportunity for students who love animals and also want to gain research skills in the domains of zoology, environmental science, and conservation. 

As a King Scholar, you’ll learn about different topics through Foundation Courses, such as Diversity Awareness and Introduction to Conservation, all while networking with others and preparing for college and an eventual career in a related field. After one year of participation, you’ll be invited to apply for scholarships and paid positions at the zoo. 

17. The Science Research Mentoring Program (SRMP) at the American Museum of Natural History  

Application Deadline: March 8

Duration: One year (August to June) 

The American Museum of Natural History is one of the most iconic and fascinating places in New York City. Its Science Research Mentoring Program is an amazing opportunity for NYC high school students to conduct a yearlong research project with Museum scientists. 

Students in SRMP get paid to learn how scientific research is conducted. Depending on their topic of study, students can learn a variety of different research skills, like working with DNA in the lab, analyzing data from space-based telescopes, reading scientific articles, and learning to code and analyze data in Python, R, and other programming languages. 

18. Anson L. Clark Scholars Program

Application Deadline:   February 15

Location: Lubbock, TX

Duration: Seven weeks (June 16 – August 1) 

Through the Anson L. Clark Scholar Program, an intensive seven-week summer research program for twelve highly qualified high school juniors and seniors, students will gain hands-on experience with practical research alongside experienced and knowledgeable faculty at Texas Tech University .

Students can choose to participate in research in one field from a broad variety of options, including cell and molecular biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, engineering, history, and more! 

To apply, students must complete an online application that includes short essays, high school transcripts, test scores (at least a PSAT if no others are available), three recommendations (at least two from teachers), and a list of the student’s top five activities.

19. UChicago Data Science Institute Summer Lab Program  

Application Deadline: January 16 

Duration: Eight weeks (June 10 – August 2)

The Data Science Institute Summer Lab Program is an immersive eight-week paid summer research program at the University of Chicago . During the program, high school and undergraduate students are paired with a data science mentor, whose expertise could be in computer science, data science, social science, climate and energy policy, public policy, materials science, biomedical research, or another related field.

Participants will hone their research methodology, research practice, and teamwork skills. No prior research experience is required to apply. All participants will receive access to applied data science research, which they will use to craft a research project. The project findings will be presented in a video that will be shown at an end-of-summer symposium.

20. UT Austin College of Natural Sciences High School Research Academy

Application Deadline: March 24

Location: Austin, TX

Duration: Five weeks (June 10 – July 17) 

Through UT Austin ’s HSRA, high school students participate in interdisciplinary research projects being conducted by active College of Natural Sciences laboratories in fields such as biochemistry, biology, environmental science, genetics, neuroscience, genome engineering, data analytics, ecology, and more. 

There is a scholarship fund for underserved groups, so some stipends and free tuition scholarships may be available to students with demonstrated financial need. 

21. Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience – Summer Research Internship

Location: Jupiter, FL

Duration: Six weeks (June 17 – July 26) 

The MPFI Summer Research Internship offers rising juniors and seniors an immersive laboratory experience where they can learn from seasoned researchers. The program is designed specifically for students with an interest in brain structure, function and development, and the advanced imaging techniques and technologies used in neuroscience. 

Program participants will participate in research projects alongside MPFI scientists, prepare a written scientific abstract based on their research project, and deliver a short presentation at the end of the summer. Research tracks include neuroscience, scientific computer programming, and mechanical engineering as it relates to neuroscience.

Applicants must be entering their junior or senior years in a Palm Beach or Martin County high school, be residents of one of those two counties, and be at least 16 by the beginning of the internship. Interns will be paid at a rate of $12.50 per hour.

22. Lincoln Park Zoo Malott Family Zoo Intern Program

Application Deadline: March 11 

Duration: Seven weeks (June 24 – August 9) 

During this paid seven-week program, high school students learn how to educate others about animal and conservation sciences while crafting digital messages to engage audiences. The program culminates in a final project. Throughout the internship, students meet with researchers and the Animal Care staff to explore careers in the animal science and conservation fields. 

Applicants must be Chicago residents between the ages of 15-18, and must be entering grades 10-12 or their freshman year of college by the start of the internship.

23. The Scripps Research High School Internship Program  

Application Deadline: April 19

Location: La Jolla, CA

Duration: Seven weeks  

The Scripps Research Institute’s La Jolla, California headquarters is proud to offer a seven-week hands-on research experience for San Diego County high schoolers. The program is specially designed to expose students to careers in the biological and chemical sciences, to provide hands-on laboratory experience, and to motivate and prepare students for continuing education in STEM. 

Because Scripps is committed to increasing the number of students from underrepresented communities in STEM college programs, a special emphasis is placed on identifying and recruiting students who are from groups that are historically underrepresented in the sciences. All students will receive a $4,760 stipend.

24. QuarkNet Summer Research Program  

Application Deadline: January 31

Location: DuPage County, IL

Duration: Seven weeks (June 17 – August 2) 

High school sophomores, juniors, and seniors with a strong interest in STEM have a unique opportunity to work with scientists on research projects during this paid seven-week program at the prestigious Fermilab, located just outside of Chicago near Batavia, IL.

Interns are encouraged to indicate areas in which they have a particular interest, although research projects vary yearly based on the work ongoing at the lab. Broadly speaking, Fermilab’s focus is on particle physics.

Required application materials include a questionnaire, a letter of recommendation, and an essay. To apply, students must have U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status and must provide evidence of identity and eligibility to work in the United States. Participants will be paid at a rate of $17.20 per hour.

25. RISE Environmentor Internship

Location: Far Rockaway, NY

Duration: Six weeks (July 1 – August 15)

The Environmentor Internship offers a great opportunity for 9th through 11th graders who live or attend school near the Rockaway Peninsula to gain firsthand research experience. Participants are mentored by scientists from local universities and research institutions as they work on projects focused on the Rockaway shoreline. Past research topics have included sea turtle strandings, octopus behavior, mussel denitrification, and dolphin fin morphology.

Students will also take part in water safety courses, receive CPR training, and explore on-water activities like kayaking and surfing. Students receive up to a $1,200 stipend, as well as community service hours for their participation in the program.

26. Stanford Institutes of Medicine Summer Research Program (SIMR)

Application Deadline: February 24

Location: Stanford, CA

Duration: Eight weeks (June 10 – August 1)

Students in this summer program are given the chance to perform research on a medically oriented project and work side by side with Stanford University students, researchers, and faculty. Students can choose from eight areas of research, including topics like immunology, cancer biology, and bioinformatics, which are all designed to increase their interest in the biological sciences and provide a deeper understanding of how scientific research is conducted.

The program is open to current high school juniors and seniors. Students will receive a minimum $500 stipend for their participation in the program.

27. Secondary Student Training Program

Application Deadline: February 16

Location: Iowa City, IA

Duration: June 19 – July 26

High schoolers in grades 10 and 11 can take part in an immersive research experience, which will allow them to explore their interests, enhance their academic skills, and build relationships with their peers during this research-focused summer program.

Participants can choose from a multitude of research areas, ranging from biology to industrial and systems engineering to religious studies. The program culminates with students creating and presenting a poster of their findings. All participants will live on the University of Iowa ‘s campus for the duration of the program, and have access to all of the university’s libraries, study areas, and computer facilities.

Although this program is quite expensive, with a fee of $7,500, financial aid is available to cover up to 95% of the cost.

28. Young Scholars Summer STEMM Research Program

Location: Urbana, IL

Duration: Six weeks (June 20 – August 2)

This program, offered by the prestigious Grainger College of Engineering at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) , allows students to gain hands-on research experience in fields such as cancer immunology, AI, physics, quantum mechanics, and electrical engineering. They will also build valuable general life skills by participating in seminars on topics ranging from the college admission process to how to communicate scientifically.

The program is open to rising 10th through 12th graders from Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Iowa, and Wisconsin.

29. Summer Science Program (SSP)

Duration: Varies depending on location and field of focus

Students in the SSP get the chance to work in small teams on a real research project and gain firsthand experience taking and analyzing data. Research opportunities are offered in three fields—astrophysics, biochemistry, and genomics—and are held at a variety of institutions, including University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Georgetown University , Purdue University , and New Mexico State University .

The program is open to high school juniors, although a small number of exceptional sophomores have attended the program. You must be between 15-19 to participate, and have completed prerequisite coursework, which varies by field. Financial aid is available for this program.

30. The Jackson Laboratory Summer Student Program

Application Deadline: January 29

Location: Bar Harbor, ME, and Farmington, CT

Duration: 10 weeks (June 1 – August 10)

Students immerse themselves in genetics and genomics research while learning about laboratory discovery and scientific communication, as well as building professional skills. Over the course of the 10-week program, students work with a mentor to develop a research project, implement their plan, analyze their data, and report their results.

This prestigious program is competitive. Just 40 students are selected to participate annually. Participants receive a $6,500 stipend and have their room, board, and travel expenses covered.

31. Fred Hutch Summer High School Internship Program

Application Deadline: March 31

Location: Seattle, WA

Duration: Eight weeks (June 24 – August 16) 

This full-time, paid internship opportunity offers students a chance to immerse themselves in activities at the Fred Hutch Cancer Center, one of the top cancer research centers in the world. The program begins with two weeks of laboratory training and is followed by six weeks of mentored activities, research seminars, workshops focused on college and careers, and social activities.

The program is open to high schoolers entering their senior year with a strong interest in science and high academic achievement, and is specifically aimed at students from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical science. Interns receive a stipend upon successful completion of the program.

How to Find Research Opportunities in High School 

Define your area of interest .

Before you start looking for opportunities, narrow your area of interest a bit, whether it’s cancer, engineering, computer science, neuroscience, or something else entirely. Also bear in mind that while there may be more STEM opportunities available for high school students, research isn’t limited to these fields—research is also a key component of the social sciences, humanities, and other non-STEM fields. 

While you should be somewhat specific about what you’re hoping to research, don’t narrow your scope so much that it’s impossible to find a valuable opportunity, especially since opportunities for high schoolers in general are more limited than they are for students who have completed at least some college.

Talk to People in Your Immediate Circle 

Teachers, neighbors, your family, parents of friends, friends of your parents—any of these people could know about a research opportunity for you, or at least know someone else who does. Throughout your life, you will find that networking is often the key to finding career opportunities. 

Leveraging your network can help you uncover unique opportunities crowdsourced by the people who know you best—the best opportunities aren’t always hosted by large universities or programs. 

Reach Out to Local Institutions and Laboratories 

In addition to networking with your immediate circle, reach out to local facilities, such as labs, hospitals, clinics, and universities that conduct research. Even if opportunities aren’t publicized, these institutions and laboratories may be willing to make room for you. Remember: when pitching your idea, don’t make it too niche—this will make it more difficult to find a fit and market your skills to labs. 

Cast a Wide Net 

Research opportunities are hard to secure, especially when you’re a young student, so you need to be persistent. You may need to write a hundred emails, but if you put in the effort and cast a wide net, you’ll vastly improve your chances of landing a great opportunity. 

Try not to be too picky, either. Of course, you shouldn’t just accept any offer , especially if it doesn’t appeal to you. But even if the opportunity doesn’t align perfectly with your skills and interests, it can still be a great chance to gain experience and make you a better candidate for future experiences.

How Will Doing Research Impact Your College Chances? 

How much participating in research enhances your college admissions profile depends on many factors, including the scope of the project, the prestige of the program or institution, your individual role and performance, the institution’s connections to or sponsorships by certain colleges, and even how much weight a college places on extracurricular activities in general. 

Generally speaking, there are four tiers of extracurricular activities that colleges think about when reviewing applicants’ activities. Selective, competitive, and prestigious activities are often found in the top tiers, Tier 1 and Tier 2. Tier 1 includes things such as being a highly recruited basketball player or an award-winning national science fair competitor. 

Tier 2 is similar, but is usually reserved for activities that are less exceptional than those in Tier 1. Tiers 3 and 4 are reserved for more common extracurricular achievements, such as holding school leadership positions or being a member of a debate team.

Research usually falls into Tier 2, and some particularly prestigious opportunities could even be Tier 1. That’s because it’s somewhat unusual for high school students to conduct research in professional and collegiate settings, so it’s more likely to impress colleges than other kinds of extracurricular activities.

Do you want to find out the impact research and other extracurricular activities might have on your chances of admission to top colleges and universities? Try using CollegeVine’s free chancing calculator ! 

Our tool evaluates your admissions profile, by accounting for factors like your grades,standardized test scores, and extracurriculars (including research!) to show you how you stack up against other applicants and how likely you are to get into hundreds of different colleges and universities. You’ll also receive tips on how to improve your profile and your odds—all for free.

Disclaimer: This post includes content sponsored by Lumiere Education.

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37+ Great Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students

Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students (1)

Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and the network of nerves throughout your body.

It’s a field that combines biology, chemistry, physics, and even computer science to understand how our brains function and control everything we do, think, and feel.

Your brain is the most complex and powerful computer ever created. It’s constantly processing information, making decisions, storing memories, and controlling your body, all without you even realizing it.

Neuroscience aims to unravel these best project ideas and figure out how this incredible organ works.

Does Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students So Exciting?

Well, it’s at the forefront of scientific discovery. Every day, researchers are making new breakthroughs that help us understand ourselves better.

From finding ways to treat brain disorders to developing artificial intelligence, neuroscience is shaping our future in ways we can barely imagine.

The importance of neuroscience in understanding the brain and behavior can’t be overstated. It helps us comprehend why we act the way we do, how we learn and remember things, and even how we experience emotions.

By studying the Neuroscience research topics for high school students, we can develop better treatments for mental health disorders, improve learning techniques, and even enhance our overall quality of life.

Why Study Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students?

You might be wondering, “Why should I start learning about neuroscience now?” Great question! Starting early gives you a huge advantage. Here’s why:

  • It’s a head start: By learning neuroscience basics now, you’ll be way ahead of the curve if you decide to pursue it in college or as a career.
  • It helps you understand yourself: Learning about your brain can give you insights into your own behavior, emotions, and learning patterns.
  • It’s relevant to many fields: Neuroscience knowledge is valuable in medicine, psychology, education, artificial intelligence, and many other areas.
  • It develops critical thinking: Studying neuroscience encourages you to ask questions, analyze data, and think critically – skills that are useful in any career.
  • It’s fascinating: Let’s face it, the brain is just plain cool. Who wouldn’t want to learn more about the organ that makes us who we are?

Studying neuroscience can open doors to exciting careers in science and medicine. You could become a neuroscientist, researching groundbreaking treatments for diseases like Alzheimer’s. Or maybe you’ll be a brain surgeon, saving lives in the operating room. Perhaps you’ll use your knowledge to develop educational programs that help people learn more effectively. The possibilities are endless!

Best Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students

Here are the Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students:

1. Brain Structure and Function

Exploring the anatomy of the brain.

Your brain might look like a wrinkly blob, but it’s actually a highly organized structure. Let’s take a quick tour:

  • Cerebral Cortex: This is the outermost layer of the brain, responsible for higher-order thinking, sensory processing, and voluntary movement.
  • Frontal Lobe: Located at the front of the brain, it’s involved in planning, decision-making, and personality.
  • Parietal Lobe: This processes sensory information and helps with spatial awareness.
  • Temporal Lobe: Important for processing auditory information and playing a role in memory and emotion.
  • Occipital Lobe: This is where visual processing occurs.
  • Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it’s crucial for balance and coordinating movement.
  • Brainstem: Connects the brain to the spinal cord and controls vital functions like breathing and heart rate.

How the Brain Processes Information

The brain’s basic unit of communication is the neuron. Neurons are specialized cells that transmit information through electrical and chemical signals. Here’s a simplified version of how it works:

  • A neuron receives a signal from another neuron or sensory input.
  • If the signal is strong enough, it triggers an electrical impulse called an action potential.
  • This impulse travels down the neuron’s axon (a long, thin extension of the cell).
  • When it reaches the end of the axon, it triggers the release of chemicals called neurotransmitters.
  • These neurotransmitters cross a tiny gap called a synapse and bind to receptors on the next neuron, passing on the signal.

This process happens billions of times every second in your brain, allowing you to think, feel, and interact with the world around you.

2. Brain Development and Plasticity

Understanding brain development.

Your brain starts developing before you’re even born and continues to change throughout your life. Here’s a quick overview of the stages:

  • Prenatal: Neural tube forms and basic brain structures develop.
  • Infancy: Rapid growth and formation of neural connections.
  • Childhood: Continued growth and pruning of neural connections.
  • Adolescence: Refinement of neural circuits, especially in areas involved in decision-making and impulse control.
  • Adulthood: Slower changes, but the brain continues to adapt and learn.

The Concept of Neuroplasticity

Neuroplasticity is your brain’s superpower – its ability to change and adapt throughout your life. This means your brain can:

  • Form new neural connections
  • Strengthen existing connections
  • Prune away unused connections
  • Reorganize itself after injury

This is why you can learn new skills at any age, recover from brain injuries, and why practicing something makes you better at it. Pretty cool, right?

3. Memory and Learning

The science of memory formation.

Have you ever wondered why you can remember some things easily while others slip away? Let’s look at how memory works:

  • Short-term memory: This is like your brain’s temporary storage. It can hold about 7 items for around 20-30 seconds.
  • Working memory: This is where you manipulate the information you’re currently using, like when solving a math problem.
  • Explicit memories: Things you consciously remember, like facts or events.
  • Implicit memories: Skills and habits you’ve learned, like riding a bike.

When you learn something new, your brain forms new connections between neurons. The more you review or practice, the stronger these connections become, making the memory more permanent.

Techniques to Enhance Learning

Want to boost your learning power? Try these Neuroscience research topics for high school students strategies:

  • Spaced repetition: Review information at increasing intervals.
  • Active recall: Test yourself instead of just re-reading.
  • Elaborative rehearsal: Connect new information to things you already know.
  • Get enough sleep: Sleep helps consolidate memories.
  • Exercise: Physical activity can improve memory and cognitive function.

4. Brain and Behavior

How the brain influences behavior.

Every decision you make, every emotion you feel, and every action you take is influenced by your brain. For example:

  • The prefrontal cortex helps you make decisions and control impulses.
  • The amygdala plays a crucial role in processing emotions, especially fear.
  • The hypothalamus regulates basic needs like hunger and thirst.

Understanding how these brain regions work together can help explain why we behave the way we do in different situations.

Understanding Mental Health Disorders

Mental health disorders affect millions of people worldwide. Neuroscience helps us understand these conditions better:

  • Anxiety: Often involves an overactive amygdala and altered neurotransmitter levels.
  • Depression: May be related to imbalances in neurotransmitters like serotonin and changes in brain structure.
  • Schizophrenia: Involves multiple brain regions and neurotransmitter systems.

By understanding the neural basis of these disorders, scientists can develop more effective treatments.

5. Sensory Systems

How the brain processes senses.

Your senses are your window to the world. Here’s a quick look at how your brain processes sensory information:

  • Vision: Light enters your eyes and is converted into electrical signals that travel to the occipital lobe for processing.
  • Hearing: Sound waves are converted to electrical signals in your inner ear and processed in the auditory cortex.
  • Touch: Receptors in your skin send signals to the somatosensory cortex.
  • Taste and Smell: These chemical senses are closely linked and involve areas like the olfactory bulb and insular cortex.

The Role of Sensory Neurons

Sensory neurons are specialized cells that detect stimuli from the environment and convert them into electrical signals. These signals then travel through the nervous system to the brain, where they’re interpreted as sight, sound, touch, taste, or smell.

6. Neurotechnology and Innovations

Latest advances in neurotechnology.

Neurotechnology is one of the most exciting Neuroscience research topics for high school students. Some cutting-edge developments include:

  • Brain-computer interfaces: These allow direct communication between the brain and external devices.
  • Optogenetics: A technique that uses light to control neurons, helping researchers study brain function.
  • Advanced neuroimaging: Techniques like fMRI and PET scans allow us to see the brain in action.

Future of Neuroscience Research Topics For High School Students

The future of neuroscience is bright and full of potential. Some areas to watch include:

  • Personalized medicine for brain disorders
  • AI-assisted brain mapping
  • Neuroprosthetics for restoring lost function
  • Brain-inspired computing and artificial intelligence

7. Cognitive Neuroscience

Studying cognition and brain function.

Cognitive neuroscience explores how brain activity relates to thinking and behavior. It investigates processes like:

  • Attention: How we focus on specific information
  • Decision making: How we choose between options
  • Problem-solving: How we approach and solve complex tasks
  • Language: How we produce and understand speech

Researchers use tools like brain imaging and behavioral experiments to understand these processes.

Role of Emotions in Cognitive Processes

Emotions aren’t just feelings – they play a crucial role in how we think and behave. For example:

  • Emotional memories are often stronger than neutral ones.
  • Emotions can influence decision-making, sometimes leading to biases.
  • Positive emotions can enhance creativity and problem-solving.

Understanding the interplay between emotion and cognition can help us make better decisions and improve our mental well-being.

8. Neuroscience in Everyday Life

Applying neuroscience in real life.

Neuroscience isn’t just for labs and hospitals – it has practical applications in daily life:

  • Education: Understanding how the brain learns can improve teaching methods.
  • Marketing: Knowing how the brain responds to ads can make them more effective.
  • User Experience Design: Neuroscience principles can make technology more intuitive.
  • Sports: Understanding motor learning can enhance athletic performance.

Neuroscience Behind Common Activities

Even everyday activities involve complex brain processes:

  • Sleep: Your brain doesn’t shut off when you sleep – it’s busy consolidating memories and cleaning out waste products.
  • Exercise: Physical activity can boost brain health, improving mood and cognitive function.
  • Nutrition: What you eat affects your brain’s performance and long-term health.

Understanding these processes can help you make choices that support your brain health and overall well-being.

As we’ve explored in this guide, Neuroscience research topics for high school students is a field with enormous potential. It helps us understand ourselves better, develop treatments for brain disorders, and even create new technologies. By studying the brain, we’re unlocking the secrets of what makes us human.

If you’re excited about Neuroscience research topics for high school students, keep learning. Read books, watch documentaries, and maybe even reach out to local universities to see if they have programs for high school students. Who knows? You might be the one to make the next big breakthrough in understanding the brain.

As you continue your studies, remember that your brain is incredibly adaptable. Every time you learn something new, you’re literally changing your brain. So keep challenging yourself, stay curious, and never stop exploring the amazing world of neuroscience!

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571 Public K–12 Schools Receive State Recognition for Outstanding Achievement

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Katy Payne   she/her 360-764-0201

For years, the Washington School Recognition Program has honored K–12 public schools across the state for closing opportunity gaps and for students’ growth and academic achievement.

Washington School Recognition Program

For the 2021–22 and 2022–23 school years, 571 public schools in 178 school districts across Washington state have earned this recognition. Of those, 104 public schools earned recognition for both school years.

Recognized schools will receive a banner to display in their buildings. The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) partners with the State Board of Education (SBE) and Educational Opportunity Gap Oversight and Accountability Committee (EOGOAC) to identify and recognize schools for the program.

Schools that are recognized are those that have been identified for school improvement supports through the Washington School Improvement Framework (WSIF). In alignment with federal requirements, the WSIF uses multiple measures of data to identify schools to receive additional state resources, tools, and assistance targeted to meet student needs. Those supports vary depending on the needs of the school, and may include additional technical assistance, partnerships with continuous improvement professionals, and access to targeted funding.

There are three routes for schools to be honored by the Washington School Recognition Program:

  • Closing Gaps: These schools make significant advancements for all students or specific student groups in the area identified for improvement.
  • Growth: These schools have at least one student group among the highest performers on at least 60% of WSIF measures.
  • Achievement: These schools show high performance on at least two of the following measures: attendance, dual credit completion, English language arts (ELA) assessments, graduation rates, math assessments, and ninth grade on-track.

Schools can be recognized for gains in more than one category. For the 2022–23 school year:

  • 78 schools are being recognized for closing gaps,
  • 241 schools are being recognized for growth, and
  • 81 schools are being recognized for achievement.

For the 2021–22 school year:

  • 83 schools are being recognized for closing gaps,
  • 217 schools are being recognized for growth, and
  • 48 schools are being recognized for achievement.

The full lists of all schools earning recognition can be found on SBE’s website .

The Washington School Recognition Program was previously known as the Washington Achievement Awards. The program was on pause during the 2019–20 and 2020–21 school years as schools navigated the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

For More Information

  • Washington State Board of Education
  • Educational Opportunity Gap Oversight and Accountability Committee
  • Washington School Improvement Framework

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5 Important Takeaways From The 2024–2025 U.S. News And World Report Best Global University Rankings

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Harvard University

This morning, U.S. News and World Report released their much-anticipated 2024-2025 Best Global University Rankings. These annual rankings are a cornerstone in the field, influencing decisions that range from student applications to institutional funding and providing a glimpse into the current state of affairs in the world of higher education. This list can provide helpful insights into the relative merits of the schools students may be considering adding to their college lists. In order to use this list effectively, however, it is important to understand the nuances of the ranking system and the factors considered therein.

Here is a breakdown of the rankings’ methodology, as well as key takeaways from this year’s list:

Methodology

The U.S. News and World Report Best Global University Rankings are based on a comprehensive methodology that evaluates colleges and universities across thirteen key metrics. These include:

  • Global research reputation (12.5%)
  • Regional research reputation (12.5%)
  • Publications (10%)
  • Books (2.5%)
  • Conferences (2.5%)
  • Normalized citation impact (10%)
  • Total citations (7.5%)
  • Number of publications that are among the 10% most cited (12.5%)
  • Percentage of total publications that are among the 10% most cited (10%)
  • International collaboration – relative to country (5%)
  • International collaboration (5%)
  • Number of highly cited papers that are among the top 1% most cited in their respective field 5%
  • Percentage of total publications that are among the top 1% most highly cited papers 5%

In addition to the overall global rankings and country-specific rankings, U.S. News and World Report published a subject-specific ranking list , evaluating schools’ global positions in over 50 individual disciplines.

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These rankings offer quantitative data students can consider when building their college lists, providing a fairly comprehensive picture of universities’ academic prowess and institutional reach. That being said, students using the rankings to build their college lists should note that many of these factors do not capture the qualitative aspects of students’ experiences.

Key Takeaways from the 2024–25 Rankings

1. The number of universities considered rose by more than 10%.

This year, 2,250 universities across over 100 countries were considered—up more than ten percent from the 2,000 schools considered in the previous ranking.

2. Harvard University lands on top.

As in the last cycle, Harvard University claimed the #1 spot in the global rankings list. This prestigious accolade reflects Harvard's unparalleled academic excellence, groundbreaking research, and global influence. Known for its distinguished faculty, cutting-edge facilities, and a tradition of innovation, Harvard continues to set the standard in higher education, making it the leading choice for students and scholars worldwide.

3. The U.S. dominates the rankings for another year.

Nearly half of the top 50 schools in the ranking are located in the U.S., totaling 24 of the top 50 on the rankings list. Additionally, four out of the top five are U.S. schools: Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, and University of California, Berkeley. This remarkable achievement underscores the global prestige of U.S. universities, known for their world-class research, innovative academic programs, and extensive resources.

4. UT Austin and Brown University dropped in the rankings.

Both Brown University and The University of Texas at Austin surprisingly dropped in the rankings, falling out of the top 50. Given both schools’ excellence, this shift demonstrates the fierce competition for top spots in the rankings this year.

5. U.S. News and World Report adds new subjects to the rankings.

This year, four new disciplines were added to the subject-specific rankings, including: ecology; green and sustainable science and technology; environmental engineering; and marine and freshwater biology. These additions not only demonstrate the ranking system’s commitment to reflecting the most relevant information in higher education today, but also provide a glimpse into recent trends and changes in the disciplinary offerings at the most prestigious universities in the world.

The 2024–2025 U.S. News and World Report Rankings offer students valuable information regarding the trends in the global higher education landscape. While students should take their personal preferences and the intangible elements of a school’s culture that draw them to a specific school into account, these rankings can be a helpful first step for students as they set their collegiate goals and assemble their college lists.

Christopher Rim

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  1. Reasearch Ideas for High School Students

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  4. 100 Qualitative Research Titles For High School Students

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  1. 100 Interesting Research Paper Topics for High Schoolers

    For example, last year over 4000 students applied for 500 spots in the Lumiere Research Scholar Program, a rigorous research program founded by Harvard researchers. The program pairs high-school students with Ph.D. mentors to work 1-on-1 on an independent research project .

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    These research topics for high school students are designed to enhance your understanding of chemical principles and their real-world applications. Biology Research Topics. Research topics for high school students in biology open up a fascinating window into the complexities of the living world. 31. Genetic Basis of Inherited Diseases

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    Controversial Topics. Lastly, some consider these topics controversial, yet they may be a great interest to some students. Topics include: Human health, health issues, access to healthcare, medicine costs (especially in the US) Birth control. Teen pregnancy. Abortion rights, laws, limitations. Animal rights.

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    Topic 1: Artificial Intelligence (AI) AI stands at the forefront of technological innovation. Students can engage in research on AI applications in various sectors and the ethical implications of AI. This field is suitable for students with interests in computer science, AI, data analytics, and related areas. Topic 2: Applied Math and AI.

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  13. 113 Great Research Paper Topics

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