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10 Tips for a Successful Army ROTC National Scholarship Application

Each year between October through March is the ROTC National Scholarship season where high school seniors apply for ROTC scholarships through the GoArmy website .  The Eastern Washington University Army ROTC office helps dozens of applicants each year navigate the ROTC scholarship process.  Based on this experience we have some tips we recommend to all ROTC National Scholarship applicants to maximize their opportunity to be awarded an ROTC scholarship.

nrotc scholarship essay examples

  1.  Submit Your Application Early :   The first scholarship board usually meets in October, the second board in January, and the third board in March.  Getting your application completed before the first board will increase your chances of receiving a scholarship because the application will be seen three times.  Additionally the first board is where a lot of four year scholarships are awarded from as well.  If you really want a four year scholarship get your application complete prior to the first board.  Key things that need to be done to have the scholarship ready for the first board is to upload your high school transcripts, upload your SAT or ACT scores, complete the physical fitness test, and conduct an interview.  Here at Eastern we can complete both the fitness test and interview for you.  Contact us at [email protected] to schedule.

Go Army website

  2.  List 5 or More Schools on Your Application :  Applicants need to be realistic when putting down universities on their application.  Putting down only Harvard and MIT on the ROTC application, but only having an 1150 on the SAT means you are probably not getting a scholarship for those universities.  However, if you list Harvard & MIT plus three or more other schools you could likely get admitted to with an 1150 SAT score will increase your chance of receiving a scholarship to a school other than Harvard or MIT.  A scholarship to your third of fourth school is better than no scholarship at all.  Each university’s ROTC office has a Recruiting Officer called a “ROO” that can assist with learning what the admissions requirements are for each university.

  3.  Find Out What Type of ROTC Program You Are Applying to :  Something to keep in mind is that not all ROTC programs are created equal.  If you are planning to attend a university that has a host ROTC program you are likely going to have more military cadre and resources to better prepare you for the challenges ahead in ROTC.  Other universities have ROTC programs that are extension or satellite campuses.  Extension programs may require their students to drive to the host program to take courses.  If going to an extension program find out how far you have to drive to do physical training and ROTC classes.  The amount of driving to do ROTC may influence your decision to attend that school.  Satellite campuses may have very limited cadre, as little as two full time ROTC instructors.  If going to a satellite campus find out how many instructors they have assigned.  At EWU Army ROTC we are a  fully staffed host program with a proven track record of getting Cadets ready to succeed in both ROTC and the Army.

  4.  Visit Multiple ROTC Programs :   The best way to figure out if an ROTC program is right for you is to visit it.  If possible try to visit multiple ROTC programs to compare and contrast them.  This will also help you determine if you are attending a host, extension, or satellite program.  If attending a host program make an appointment with the ROO and ask to meet with the Professor of Military Science (PMS) who is usually a Lieutenant Colonel in charge of the ROTC battalion.  Ask about how well the program scores at Advanced Camp?  How many first branch choices did the MS-IV class receive?  Ask about where they train at?  How many Cadets are on scholarship?  How does the program perform at Ranger Challenge competitions?  This should give you an idea of how well the ROTC program is performing.  Also bring your parents to the ROTC program to meet the ROO and PMS.  At EWU Army ROTC, our ROO and PMS always makes time to visit with parents.  We want you and your parents to be as comfortable as possible with your decision to dedicate four years of your life being part of our ROTC program.

nrotc scholarship essay examples

5.  Ask What Other Scholarships Are Available :  Even if you do not receive an ROTC National Scholarship talk to the ROTC program you are interested in about other scholarship options.  They should be able to inform you about ROTC campus based scholarships, Minuteman Scholarships , and Guaranteed Reserve Forces Duty (GRFD) Scholarships.  Some schools also have various academic and alumni scholarships that Cadets can apply for as well.  For example at EWU we have four Cadets on a fraternity sponsored Randy Van Turner ROTC Scholarship and another on the Chertok Memorial Scholarship which is an academic scholarship awarded through the College of Social Sciences.

LaTour RVT Scholarship

6.  Train to Take Your Fitness Test:   Applicants that are not in the best of shape should spend a month training to improve their fitness prior to taking the fitness test.  ROTC scholarships are highly competitive and running a seven minute mile could be the difference between receiving a 4 year or 3 year scholarship.  If possible try and take the scholarship fitness test while visiting the ROTC program you are most interested in.  Fitness is a very important attribute of being an Army officer and preparing for the test and doing well on it will make a good first impression with the ROTC Cadre.

7.  Prepare for Your Interview:   The interview for the ROTC National Scholarship is very important since it is worth 200 points.  Additionally the interviewer who is usually a Professor of Military Science, will write an assessment of you that will be read by the scholarship board.  Making a good first impression is critical, show up on time and come dressed for success.  Don’t wear torn up jeans and t-shirts to an ROTC interview.  Business dress for both males and females is very appropriate for a scholarship interview.  Don’t be taking calls or answering texts on your phone during the interview.  Yes I have seen this happen!   Be prepared to answer simple questions like, “Tell me a little about yourself”.  Remember you are selling yourself to the PMS to write the best assessment possible of you to the scholarship board.  Be well prepared to answer questions and think on your feet.  Finally be prepared to ask the interviewer some questions at the end of the interview.  This further demonstrates how prepared you were for the interview.

8.  Spend Time Writing a Quality Essay:  On the ROTC application you will have the opportunity to write a little bit about yourself.  Make sure to spend the time to write a quality essay, personal statement, and achievements.  You especially should highlight why you want to be an Army officer.  Make sure you use proper grammar and don’t have misspellings.  Writing is an important skill for Army officers to have, so show the board you can write a quality narrative.  In the narrative make sure to highlight aspects about you that will make you stand out from the crowd.  Mentions things like if you ranked nationally in some event, how many hours you were per week at your job, any awards you have received, volunteer service, etc.

  9.  Play a Sport:   Points are awarded on the ROTC scholarship application for sports played.  Remember that Cadets in ROTC are scholar athletes, just like members of the university’s sports teams.  The Army wants its officers to be athletic.  If you know you plan to apply in the future for an ROTC Scholarship than find a sport to play in high school, preferably two of them.  Having all-conference and all-state sports honors on an ROTC application will really help the application stand apart from the crowd.

10.  Get Involved in Organizations:   On the scholarship interview there are points that can be awarded for being involved in school and community activities.  For example being elected to student government and being a member of the National Honor Society are worth points.  Being involved in Scouting or Civil Air Patrol are examples on community organizations that points can be awarded for.  Volunteering for local organizations are other great things to include on the application and mention during interviews.

ROTC National Scholarship winner

Following these tips will help you be competitive for an ROTC scholarship.  However, these tips cannot overcome poor performance in the classroom.  Keeping a high GPA and scoring well on the SAT or ACT are very important for being competitive for an ROTC scholarship.  The Army is looking for Scholar, Athlete, Leaders so try to work towards meeting all three of these criteria in your application.  Good luck to everyone pursuing an ROTC scholarship and feel free to leave a comment or email us at [email protected] with any questions.

2 thoughts on “10 Tips for a Successful Army ROTC National Scholarship Application”

ROTC scholarship application question

This is the summer after my Junior year, I’m supposed to be starting the application right? The reason why I ask this, is the on the deadline section the boards still say 2018-2019.

2.For the school year it says 2020-2021, what does this refer to?

I’m basically looking for conformation I didn’t screw up the start of the application by being too early. Again, I’m going to my senior year starting in august, and I graduate 2020.

The 2020-2021 scholarship season is for current high school seniors that submitted ROTC applications. The 2020-2021 scholarship season is about to be over. Since you are a junior currently your first year in college would be the 2021-2022 academic year and thus this is the timeframe you will be competing for a scholarship for.

This summer you can start putting your application together. Make sure to take your ACT or SAT early to have time to take a retest if needed. This is something I have seen issues with applicants before with. Once you are good with your ACT or SAT, you will need to contact your nearest ROTC department to conduct the fitness test and interview. If you live in the Spokane region we can easily take care of this for you.

Please let me know if you have any other questions. Go Eags!

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My NROTC essay

  • Thread starter Immy
  • Start date Nov 16, 2008

Immy

  • Nov 16, 2008

So my recruiter told me that if I have my app in before this weekend is over, I can make the Dec. 8 boards. So, I've been working to get it done and finalize all my decisions regarding college. I like to think a bit too much about things, and have been making sure this is what I want to do. It is. This is my essay for the "Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Naval Officer" topic. I'm looking for any and all criticism, grammatically and whatever else, especially about my reasons. Should I put that I want to become a Naval Aviator? Are some of my reasons stupid? Let me know, please. Thanks in advance for any help and I apologize if there is already a thread on this! I desire to become a Naval Officer for a few reasons. The first of these is to serve my country. I believe that there is nothing more honorable than serving one's country in the military. Having several family members who have served in the Army, I am not a total stranger to military service. Secondly, it is my belief that by becoming a Naval Officer will only serve to better myself as a person, physically and mentally. Serving in the Navy will let me gain valuable life and leadership qualities that cannot be gained anywhere else. While a civilian occupation obviously can have its benefits, being in the military can only benefit more due to the added discipline and professionalism. With lives potentially being at stake, there is no room for error in any of the services. Physically, the standards set by the Navy will force me to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. While I have no work out regimen established now, I plan to very soon so I can become as physically fit as I possibly can going into NROTC. Mentally, all the knowledge I will have gained in college will only be expounded on while serving in the Navy. Certain things that would not be taught to me in the civilian world will definitely have a huge importance in the Navy. Thirdly, it would be a privilege able to lead sailors in the Navy as an officer. It is a huge responsibility, and with so many men and women depending on one's leadership as an officer I can see why the standards are so high for officers in any of the services. I hope that I can meet those standards and lead to the best of my abilities; anything I can do to make myself into a better leader I will. Finally, it is my goal to become a Naval Aviator. While this is down the road a bit, it has always been my desire to fly any aircraft in the military. Only recently have I realized this was practical due to advancements in eye surgery. While having this goal, I also realize that being a Naval Officer comes first on my priority list, and I would be happy serving in any of the positions that the Navy has to offer. In conclusion, my reasons for wanting to become a Naval Officer are extensive, and it is a huge undertaking, but I believe that if I succeed to the best of my abilities I can accomplish this goal and become a successful officer in the United States Navy. Thanks again.  

Stick

None of your reasons are stupid, they are YOUR reasons. Things I would change: 1) Capitalize the word Sailor. In the Navy it was declared to be a proper noun a few years ago and is supposed to be capitalized. 2) I would drop the whole sentence about advances in eye surgery. I wouldn't tell then you have eye problems just yet. Just get the surgery done. You can look up all the requirements about what surgery you need to get to be eligible for aviation. 3) I would not say you don't work out now. That could give the impression that you are lazy. These are just my opinions, so take it how you want. I am sure others will provide feedback.  

Thanks! Will revise as suggested.  

CommodoreMid

CommodoreMid

Whateva i do what i want.

In terms of style, go through and try to make your voice a little more active. You use a lot of "being" verbs- try to use ones that suggest "doing" if you know what I mean. Also, try to eliminate unnecessary adjectives and adverbs. They clutter up your sentences without adding much meaning. You know what points you are trying to convey so you need to decide what words will best accomplish that succinctly.  

Ok, this is what I have revised so far. I desire to become a Naval Officer for a few reasons. The first of these is to serve my country. I believe that there is nothing more honorable than serving one's country in the military. Having several family members who have served in the Army, I am not a total stranger to military service. Secondly, I hold a belief that by becoming a Naval Officer will only serve to better myself as a person. Serving in the Navy will let me gain valuable life and leadership qualities that cannot be gained anywhere else. While a civilian occupation obviously can have its benefits, being in the military can only benefit more due to the added discipline and professionalism. With lives potentially being at stake, error simply cannot be allowed. Physically, the standards set by the Navy will force me to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. Mentally, all the knowledge I will have gained in college will only be expounded on while serving in the Navy. Certain things I would not learn in the civilian world will definitely have a huge importance in the Navy. Thirdly, it would be a privilege to lead Sailors in the Navy as an officer. It is a huge responsibility, and with so many men and women depending on one's leadership as an officer I can see why the standards are so high for officers in any of the services. I hope that I can meet those standards and lead to the best of my abilities; anything I can do to make myself into a better leader I will. Finally, I hope to become a Naval Aviator. While this is down the road a bit, it has always been my desire to fly any aircraft in the military. While having this goal, I also realize that being a Naval Officer comes first on my priority list, and I would be happy serving in any of the positions that the Navy has to offer. In conclusion, my reasons for wanting to become a Naval Officer are extensive, and it is a huge undertaking, but I believe that if I succeed to the best of my abilities I can accomplish this goal and become a successful officer in the United States Navy. It hasn't changed much, but I've tried to use more action instead of linking verbs, capitalized Sailors, and left out the eye surgery and training regimen bit. More suggestions welcome, thanks again!  

Lobster

Well-Known Member

Your overall idea is good but speak about what qualities you have that would be assets to the Navy, you have spoken about how the Navy would be great for you but you also need to let the reader know how you will be an asset to the Navy, what will you do in the Navy, how you can benefit the Navy, how your previous leadership experience can help the Navy.  

Thanks! Revised again.  

Schnugg

It's gettin' a bit dramatic 'round here...

Work on the stuff in red, eliminate the number counting underlined... I desire to become a Naval Officer for a few reasons . The first of these is to serve my country. I believe that there is nothing more honorable than serving one's country in the military. Having several family members who have served in the Army, I am not a total stranger to military service. Secondly , I hold a belief that by becoming a Naval Officer will only serve to better myself as a person. Serving in the Navy will let me gain valuable life and leadership qualities that cannot be gained anywhere else. While a civilian occupation obviously can have its benefits, being in the military can only benefit more due to the added discipline and professionalism. With lives potentially being at stake, error simply cannot be allowed. Physically, the standards set by the Navy will force me to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. Mentally, all the knowledge I will have gained in college will only be expounded on while serving in the Navy. C ertain things I would not learn in the civilian world will definitely have a huge importance in the Navy . Thirdly , it would be a privilege to lead Sailors in the Navy as an officer. It is a huge responsibility, and with so many men and women depending on one's leadership as an officer I can see why the standards are so high for officers in any of the services. I hope that I can meet those standards and lead to the best of my abilities; anything I can do to make myself into a better leader I will. Finally , I hope to become a Naval Aviator. While this is down the road a bit, it has always been my desire to fly any aircraft in the military. While having this goal, I also realize that being a Naval Officer comes first on my priority list, and I would be happy serving in any of the positions that the Navy has to offer. In conclusion, my reasons for wanting to become a Naval Officer are extensive , and it is a huge undertaking, but I believe that if I succeed to the best of my abilities I can accomplish this goal and become a successful officer in the United States Navy. These don't align: I desire to become a Naval Officer for a few reasons .... In conclusion, my reasons for wanting to become a Naval Officer are extensive , and it is a huge undertaking , (what's extensive, you're reasons?)  

Thanks! Revised. Wasn't totally sure what you meant by work on, but I changed what I thought necessary. Any further changes welcomed before I submit my app tonight. I desire to become a Naval Officer for a number of reasons, and realize that in order to become a Naval Officer it will take a huge personal investment. Serving my country is at the top of my list of reasons. I believe that there is nothing more honorable than serving one's country in the military. Having two grandfathers and an uncle who have served in the Army, I am not a total stranger to military service. Also, I hold a belief that by becoming a Naval Officer will only serve to better myself as a person. Serving in the Navy will let me gain valuable life and leadership qualities that cannot be gained anywhere else. While a civilian occupation obviously can have its benefits, being in the military can only benefit more due to the added discipline and professionalism. With lives potentially being at stake, error simply cannot be allowed. Physically, the standards set by the Navy will motivate me to keep myself as healthy as I possibly can. Mentally, all the knowledge I will have gained in college be of great importance while serving in the Navy. Certain things I would not learn in the civilian world will definitely have a huge importance in the Navy. It would also be a privilege to lead Sailors in the Navy as an officer. It is a huge responsibility, and with so many men and women depending on one's leadership as an officer I can see why the standards are so high for officers in any of the services. I hope that I can meet those standards and lead to the best of my abilities; anything I can do to make myself into a better leader I will. In the Navy, I hope to become a Naval Aviator. While this is down the road a bit, it has always been my desire to fly any aircraft in the military. While having this goal, I also realize that being a Naval Officer comes first on my priority list, and I would be happy serving in any of the positions that the Navy has to offer. I also firmly believe that I can prove myself as an asset to the Navy. My life experiences up to this point, playing varsity golf, being a youth tutor, holding down a job, and succeeding in the classroom, will only benefit the Navy if I am so fortunate as to gain a commission. In conclusion, my reasons for wanting to become a Naval Officer are extensive, and it is a huge undertaking, but I believe that if I succeed to the best of my abilities I can accomplish this goal and become a successful officer in the United States Navy. Revised to make statements align, thanks Schnugg. Any other revisions still welcome!  

SLB

My life experiences up to this point, playing varsity golf, being a youth tutor, holding down a job, and succeeding in the classroom, will only benefit the Navy if I am so fortunate as to gain a commission Click to expand...
  • Nov 17, 2008
SLB said: Explain why these experiences will help the Navy. For instance, playing varsity golf has taught you the importance of teamwork, a job has taught you how to manage your time, being a youth tutor has taught you the importance of passing on knowledge. Of course use your own reasons. Good Luck. SLB Click to expand...

;)

"I believe in ammunition"

kurtzie21 said: Your overall idea is good but speak about what qualities you have that would be assets to the Navy, you have spoken about how the Navy would be great for you but you also need to let the reader know how you will be an asset to the Navy, what will you do in the Navy, how you can benefit the Navy, how your previous leadership experience can help the Navy. Click to expand...
Junkball said: " And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country." -JFK's inaugural address Emphasize what you can contribute to the Navy. The men and women you're writing to know all about the benefits of service in the Service, but if you're only talking about what you gain, that doesn't sound much like service, does it? Click to expand...

I revised it a bit more with more emphasis on what I could do for the navy and submitted it earlier, my recruiter is working on setting up the interview now. Nice to finally have the ball rolling. Even if I don't get the 4 year (which I honestly don't expect to, considering my major and the only thing I have that is well above average is my ACT) I'm still gonna do ROTC and hopefully pick up a 2 or 3 yr. scholarship. Thanks so much for all the tips, my essay wouldn't be half as good as it is now if it wasn't for this site.  

CWJones411

kurtzie21 said: haha well said, wasn't that in someone's essay on here a while back? Click to expand...

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NROTC Essay Questions

  • Thread starter wannabeplebe
  • Start date Jul 20, 2017

wannabeplebe

  • Jul 20, 2017

On the NROTC application, under the Essays tab, there are about 4 main fields to fill in. The first being the essay about why you want to be an officer, etc. and that allows for 2500 characters. However, the two following - one about living abroad and the other about diversity in your family situation, both allow for 2500 characters also. I was curious about how much they want for these two essays (other than no more than 2500 characters). Are they meant to be actual well-formed essays with introductions, conclusions, etc. as is the first? I answered both questions, detailing what they specifically asked in the questions but not much more and I'm at about 500-600 for each. Is there a point where being concise works against you or do they just allow the same character count as the main essay in case someone has a very in-depth problem/situation they must describe?  

  • Jul 21, 2017

Bumping this because I'm very close to submitting my application but would like to get this cleared up first. Any help much appreciated!!  

eljay60

AFROTC parent, former ANC in USAR

  • Jul 22, 2017

I don't think anyone here can help with this - anyone on the admissions board can't ethically tell you what you are looking for, and the rest of us have no clue what content they want, or if the character count matters. Since the essays are tweaked periodically, what worked four years ago - or even last year - for a winning applicant may have no bearing today. Proofread, proofread, proofread, and don't trust spellcheck - 'fare' and 'fair' are both legitimate words with multiple meanings, so be sure you are using the correct one. Good luck!  

kinnem

Keep in mind, beside the content of your answer, they are also looking at your ability to write and express yourself, including grammar.  

cuckleCake1783

wannabeplebe said: On the NROTC application, under the Essays tab, there are about 4 main fields to fill in. The first being the essay about why you want to be an officer, etc. and that allows for 2500 characters. However, the two following - one about living abroad and the other about diversity in your family situation, both allow for 2500 characters also. I was curious about how much they want for these two essays (other than no more than 2500 characters). Are they meant to be actual well-formed essays with introductions, conclusions, etc. as is the first? I answered both questions, detailing what they specifically asked in the questions but not much more and I'm at about 500-600 for each. Is there a point where being concise works against you or do they just allow the same character count as the main essay in case someone has a very in-depth problem/situation they must describe? Click to expand...

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nrotc scholarship essay examples

I am applying for the NROTC Scholarship and would like any advice you have to offer on my two essay. 1. Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Marine Officer. I desire to become a Marine Officer foremost to serve my country, there is no greater honor than serving your country as a Marine in the Corps. Secondly, becoming a Marine Officer will help me enhance myself both physically and mentally. Finally, it would be a privilege to lead fellow Marines in the Marine Corps as an Officer. As a child I spent most of my time reading because my family could not afford to buy my siblings and me the commodities other children enjoyed. The majority of the books I read dealt with honor, courage, and loyalty. I have tried to incorporate those values in my everyday life, but I felt that I could not truly do that with the tools I currently had in the civilian world. The military is the only place I could think of to hone those skills, and of the five branches the Marines Corps is the only one that people subsequently associate with possessing those traits. Becoming a Marine Officer would give me the tools that I lack to better myself and be an outstanding member in society. The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps would help me attain the superior physical and mental capacity needed to be Marine Officer. Physically, the high standards required to be a Marine Officer would keep me in the utmost physical condition during the four years I will be studying at a university. Mentally, I would be obtaining the knowledge necessary to succeed in the Marine Corps by applying what I learn while attending summer training assignments, as well as the naval science classes each semester, in my Military Occupational Specialty, and as a civilian by earning a degree in political science. At first, I just wanted to be an enlisted Marine, but then I got the opportunity to apply for this scholarship. It made me want something above the great honor of becoming an enlisted Marine - to become a Marine officer, and love my Marines like my family, to carry an extra pack to lighten their load , to always put them before me, but still always understand that sometimes the mission will call for some of them to get hurt. I want to lead by example. 2. How might your background and experiences enhance the U.S. Marine Corps? My background and experiences have helped form the individual that I am today, a person that strives to become a Marine Officer. I am certain that my rearing as a child and the skills that I have acquired in my life will enable me to greatly enhance the United States Marine Corps. When I was eight years old I received an unexpected obligation when older brother left, it was now my responsibility to abide for my younger brother and sister. I did not fully understand the enormity of the task until day my mother, an old fashioned lady from Mexico (this was before people started calling Child Protective Services), gave me a ferocious beating because my little brother had set a spiral notebook on fire in the apartment and explained to me that she would beat the life out of me every time my siblings did something bad, got in trouble at school, or misbehaved in public. She reasoned that I was the one they looked up to so if they were doing something improper, more than likely they picked up from me. From then on I kept a careful watch on how I acted and what I said in front of them, I had to lead them to become better than anything I could ever be. My responsibility grew even more when my mother was deported and we went to live with our paternal grandmother, who is seventy-one and works full-time at a plant nursery. I learned the meaning of hard work by helping my grandmother with my siblings by cook, clean, do the laundry, and walking to the store for groceries whenever she needed something, in addition to maintaining my grades in school. It was extremely difficult and I would have given up if not for Mrs. Rojas, my college readiness counselor, she helped me stay in school and realize that asking for help is not something to be ashamed of. She always encouraged me and told me that I could go to college if I put my mind to it; it is because of her that I am here now applying for this scholarship and not flipping burgers at Burger King. I was forced to grow up sooner than my peers and lost most of my childhood, but I do not regret it because when I think of my little sister and how she looks to me for guidance and direction, I know that her need for me to lead and mentor her was far more important than what I missed out on as a child. I look forward to using the skills that I have acquired from my background and experiences to serve my country as a United States Marine Officer.

Sgt Leprechaun is offline

Not bad, I think.

gonzo4 is offline

I applied for and received the scholarship back in 2008. Did a year of college with it and well here I am now. I can help you out on what they want to see in your essays and what you can expect from the process if you have any questions. Kank the last paragraph on the first essay. The enlisted man is the backbone of the Marine Corps and "becoming more" really belittles people who went enlisted. As an officer you really are working for them. You need to show your humility and understand you are only as good as the people you lead. They look for your able to empathize with your Marines. And use the core values of Honor Courage and Commitment dont use loyalty. Its ok to build your essay off of those because you already kinda know how that should fit into your career as an officer. On the second paragraph. Watch what you are saying about your mom getting deported and child protective services. The officer selection panel will want to investigate those matters more and them diving into your history like that can open up a huge can of worms you don't want to be opened. Also revise, revise, revise!!!! I know you are just submitting this on the site right now to have it looked at but you say things that don't make sense nor fit the subject matter. Send a copy of the essays to your OSO for them to look a and they should also give you tips on writing them. I also saw that you are in the DEP now, go talk to your recruiters and ask what they want to see in a good officer. Good luck to you hope this helped. If you have any more questions please feel free to shoot me a PM.

My revised essays

#1 I desire to become a Marine Officer foremost to serve my country; there is no greater honor than serving your country as a Marine in the United States Marine Corps. Secondly, becoming a Marine Officer will help me enhance myself both physically and mentally. Finally, leading fellow Marines in the Marine Corps as an Officer would be a privilege above all others... As a child I spent most of my time reading because my family could not afford to buy my siblings and me the commodities other children enjoyed. The majority of the books I read dealt with honor, courage, and commitment. I have tried to incorporate those values in my everyday life, but I felt that I could not truly do that with the tools I currently had in the civilian world. The military is the only place I could think of to hone those skills, and of the five branches the Marines Corps is the only one that people subsequently associate with possessing those traits. Becoming a Marine Officer would give me the tools that I lack to better myself and be an outstanding member in society. The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps would help me attain the superior physical and mental capacity needed to be Marine Officer. Physically, the high standards required to be a Marine Officer would keep me in the utmost physical condition during the four years I will be studying at a university. Mentally, I would be obtaining the knowledge necessary to succeed in the Marine Corps by applying what I learn while attending summer training assignments, as well as the naval science classes each semester, in my Military Occupational Specialty, and as a civilian by earning a degree in political science. When I swore into the Marine Corps at San Antonio I did not think there could be a greater honor than to serve among the few and the proud, then I was told that I had the opportunity to apply for this prestigious scholarship and be able to serve those few and proud Marines fighting for our freedom. #2 My background and experiences have helped form the individual that I am today, a person striving to become a Marine Officer. I am certain that my rearing as a child and the skills that I have acquired in my life will enable me to greatly enhance the United States Marine Corps. When I was eight years old I received an unexpected obligation when older brother left, I had to abide for my younger brother and sister. I did not fully understand the enormity of the task until day my mother, an old fashioned lady from Mexico, gave me a ferocious beating because my little brother had set a spiral notebook on fire in the apartment and explained to me that she would beat the life out of me every time my siblings did something bad, got in trouble at school, or misbehaved in public. She reasoned that I was the one they looked up to so if they were doing something improper, more than likely they picked up from me. From then on I kept a careful watch on how I acted and what I said in front of them, I had to lead them to become better than anything I could ever become. My responsibility grew even more when my siblings and I went to live with our paternal grandmother, who is seventy-one and works full-time at a plant nursery. I learned the meaning of hard work by helping my grandmother with my siblings by cooking, cleaning, doing the laundry, and walking to the store for groceries whenever she needed anything, in addition to maintaining my grades in school. Keeping up with everything was extremely difficult and I would have given up if not for Mrs. Rojas, my college readiness counselor, she helped me stay in school and realize that asking for help is not something to be ashamed of but a sign of someone who is willing to improve themselves. I was forced to grow up sooner than my peers and lost most of my childhood to take care of my siblings, but I do not regret losing my youth because when I think of my little sister and how she looks to me for guidance and direction, I know that her need for me to lead and mentor her was far more important than what I missed out on as a child. I look forward to using the skills that I have acquired from my background and experiences to serve my country as a United States Marine Officer.
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nrotc scholarship essay examples

April 2024 Active Duty Cutting...

nrotc scholarship essay examples

How to Write a Scholarship Essay | Template & Example

Published on October 11, 2021 by Kirsten Courault . Revised on May 31, 2023.

A good scholarship essay demonstrates the scholarship organization’s values while directly addressing the prompt. If you plan ahead , you can save time by writing one essay for multiple prompts with similar questions.

Table of contents

Apply for a wide variety of scholarships, make a scholarship tracker spreadsheet, tailor your essay to the organization and the prompt, write a focused and relevant personal story, scholarship essay example, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about college application essays.

Scholarships are a type of student financial aid that don’t require repayment. They are awarded based on various factors, including academic merit, financial need, intended major, personal background, or activities and interests.

Like college applications, scholarship applications often require students to submit their grades, standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, and an essay.

A scholarship essay shares your values and qualities in the context of a specific question, such as “How does technology affect your daily life?” or “Who has had the greatest impact on your life?”

Be wary of scholarship scams

While some applications may not require an essay, be wary of scholarship scams that do the following:

  • Guarantee you scholarship money for a fee
  • Claim scholarship information is exclusive to their company
  • Ask for your bank or credit card information to hold the scholarship

Some legitimate companies do charge for releasing comprehensive scholarship lists or creating a tailored list of scholarship opportunities based on your profile.

However, you can always discover scholarship opportunities for free through your school counselor, community network, or an online search.

Many students focus on well-known, large scholarship opportunities, which are usually very competitive. To maximize your chance of success, invest time in applying for a wide variety of scholarships: national and local, as well as big and small award amounts. There are also scholarships for international students .

In addition to charitable foundation and corporate scholarships, you should consider applying for institutional scholarships at your prospective universities, which can award money based on your application’s strength, your financial situation, and your demonstrated interest in the school.

Check with your guidance counselor, local organizations, community network, or prospective schools’ financial aid offices for scholarship opportunities. It’s a good idea to start applying as early as your junior year and continue throughout your senior year.

Choose the right scholarships for you

Choose scholarships with missions and essay topics that match your background, experiences, and interests. If the scholarship topic is meaningful to you, it will be easier for you to write an authentic and compelling essay.

Don’t shy away from applying for local scholarships with small dollar amounts. Even a few hundred dollars can help you pay for books.

Local scholarships may be more tailored to your community, background, and activities, so they’re likely more relevant to you. Fewer students apply for these scholarships, so you have less competition and a higher chance of success.

Some places to look for local scholarships include

  • Civic organizations, such as the Rotary Club, Lions Club, etc.
  • Your church, mosque, synagogue, or place of worship
  • Community groups, such as the YMCA
  • Ethnicity-based organizations
  • Your local library or local small businesses
  • Organizations related to your intended major
  • Your city or town
  • Your school district
  • Unions, such as SEIU, the Teamsters, CWA, etc.
  • Your employer or your parents’ employers
  • Banks, credit unions, and local financial institutions

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

While researching scholarship opportunities, create a scholarship tracker spreadsheet to keep track of the following:

  • Scholarship amounts
  • Required application materials

You can use our free Google Sheets template to track your scholarship applications.

Scholarship application tracker template

You can also include scholarship essay prompts in your college essay tracker sheet . By grouping or color-code overlapping essay prompts, you can plan to write a single essay for multiple scholarships. Sometimes, you can also reuse or adapt your main college essay .

Even if you’re adapting another essay, it’s important to make sure your essay directly addresses the prompt, stays within the word count limit , and demonstrates the organization’s values. The scholarship committee will be able to tell if you reuse an essay that doesn’t quite respond to the prompt, so be sure to tailor it to the questions asked.

Research each organization

Before writing, research the scholarship organization’s mission and reason for awarding the scholarship. Learning more about the organization can help you select an appropriate topic and relevant story.

While you should tailor your essay to the organization’s values, maintain your authentic voice. Never use false or exaggerated stories. If the organization’s values don’t align with yours or you can’t brainstorm a relevant story for the scholarship, continue searching for other scholarship opportunities to find a more appropriate one for you.

After researching the organization, identify a specific personal experience that embodies its values and exemplifies why you will be a successful student.

Choose a story with the following criteria:

  • Responds to the prompt
  • Demonstrates the organization’s values
  • Includes an authentic story
  • Focuses on you and your experience, not someone else’s

A good scholarship essay is not

  • A resume of your achievements
  • A lengthy opinion piece about the essay topic
  • An essay featuring a negative tone that puts down others

If appropriate, you can briefly address how the scholarship money will help you achieve your educational goals. You should also end with a brief thank-you.

Take a look at the full essay example below. Hover over the underlined parts to read explanations of why they work.

Prompt: Describe how working for Chelsea’s Chicken restaurant has developed leadership skills that will help you succeed in college. Give specific examples of leadership characteristics that you have exhibited during your employment with us.

As a nervous 16-year-old, I walked into Chelsea’s Chicken for my first day of work determined to make enough money to put gas in my car and buy pizza on the weekends. My only previous job was mowing my neighbors’ lawns when they were on vacation, so I had no idea what to expect. I was a bit intimidated by my new responsibilities, especially handling money and helping disgruntled customers.

However, it didn’t take me long to learn my way around the cash register and successfully address customer complaints. One day, Roger, the store manager, asked me if I wanted to join Chelsea’s Chicken Leadership Training Initiative. He said he saw leadership potential in me because of my attitude with the customers and my enthusiasm for learning new job responsibilities. It surprised me because I had never thought of myself as a leader, but I quickly agreed, and Roger handed me a three-ring binder that was thicker than my math and science textbooks put together! He told me to take it home and read over it during the following week.

In that binder, I discovered that being a leader means taking the initiative, especially when the job is undesirable. One week later, I got to practice that idea when a little kid threw up in the bathroom and missed the toilet. It smelled terrible, but I stepped forward and told Roger that I would clean it up. My coworkers thought I was crazy, but I started to believe in my leadership potential.

That night as we closed the store, Roger pulled me aside in the parking lot and told me that he could tell that I had been studying the manual. He wanted to give me more responsibility, along with a dollar-per-hour pay raise. I was surprised because I had been working there for only a couple of months, but his encouragement helped me make a connection: good leadership helps other people, and it often is rewarded. I was determined to experience more of both.

Within a month, I was ready to take the Team Leader exam, which mattered because I would receive a promotion and a much bigger raise if I passed. But, when I got to work, two of the scheduled team members had called in sick. We were noticeably short-handed, and our customers weren’t happy about it.

I walked back to the lockers, put on my vest and hat, and took my place behind an open register. Customers immediately moved into my line to place their orders. Roger looked at me with surprise and asked, “Did you forget that you’re testing tonight?” I responded, “No, sir—but what’s the use of taking a leadership test if you aren’t going to lead in real life?” Roger smiled at me and nodded.

He stayed late that night after we closed so that I could leave early and still take the test. I noticed that Roger was always staying late, helping employees learn new skills. His example taught me that leaders take the initiative to develop other leaders. He gave me a clear picture of what shared leadership looks like, making room for others to grow and excel. When I asked him where he learned to do that, he said, “From the same leadership manual I gave you!”

Chelsea’s Chicken has offered me so much more than a paycheck. Because of Roger’s example, I have learned to take the initiative to care for my family and friends, such as being the first to do the dishes without my mom asking or volunteering to pick up my friend for our SAT prep course. Now, as I prepare to enter college, I have confidence in my leadership ability. I know I’m signing up for a challenging major—Biology, Pre-Med—yet I also know that Chelsea’s Chicken has helped me to develop the perseverance required to complete my studies successfully.

If you want to know more about academic writing , effective communication , or parts of speech , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Academic writing

  • Writing process
  • Transition words
  • Passive voice
  • Paraphrasing

 Communication

  • How to end an email
  • Ms, mrs, miss
  • How to start an email
  • I hope this email finds you well
  • Hope you are doing well

 Parts of speech

  • Personal pronouns
  • Conjunctions

A scholarship essay requires you to demonstrate your values and qualities while answering the prompt’s specific question.

After researching the scholarship organization, identify a personal experience that embodies its values and exemplifies how you will be a successful student.

Invest time in applying for various scholarships , especially local ones with small dollar amounts, which are likely easier to win and more reflective of your background and interests. It will be easier for you to write an authentic and compelling essay if the scholarship topic is meaningful to you.

You can find scholarships through your school counselor, community network, or an internet search.

You can start applying for scholarships as early as your junior year. Continue applying throughout your senior year.

Yes, but make sure your essay directly addresses the prompt, respects the word count , and demonstrates the organization’s values.

If you plan ahead, you can save time by writing one scholarship essay for multiple prompts with similar questions. In a scholarship tracker spreadsheet, you can group or color-code overlapping essay prompts; then, write a single essay for multiple scholarships. Sometimes, you can even reuse or adapt your main college essay .

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Army ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

Army ROTC Essay Examples with Explanation Blog Post Title

LTC Robert Kirkland

8 minute read

The following are winning four-year scholarship essays from Army ROTC applicants we have worked with in the past at ROTC Consulting. We will provide commentary at the end of each essay as to why each answer is effective. You can find our previous post about building a successful essay here.

Army ROTC Essay #1

Consider carefully, and then state below in the space provided why you wish to enroll in the Army ROTC Program. Indicate in your statement how you believe your own objectives in life are related to the education and training offered by Army ROTC and what a career obligation means to you.

  • Winning Answer:

I believe that American values and our way of life are worth fighting for. One of the finest ways one can demonstrate this commitment is by becoming an officer in the United States Army. This commitment is not something to be taken lightly and I needed to explore what the duties and responsibilities of both a cadet and a lieutenant were. I had a plan.

I visited the Somerset Army National Guard unit near my home in New Jersey. There, I was introduced to a group of officers, non-commissioned officers, and cadets. I learned from my visit that officers lead by example and need to take care of their soldiers. Non-commissioned officers are the “backbone” of the Army and it is important that new lieutenants learn from their sergeants. Since I am interested in the National Guard after I commission, they told me about the civilian jobs that I could pursue in the State Police or the FBI while I was in the National Guard. It was really inspirational to see how National Guard officers and enlisted both serve their community and the Nation.

On my visit to Army ROTC at Drexel University, I spoke to the PMS and what struck me was the importance for future leaders to become proficient in basic soldier skills and troop leading procedures. The ROOs at TCU and Wake Forest reinforced this message. I know that by mastering these tasks, I will be a successful lieutenant and the best leader I can be no matter what path I choose in life.

Once I become a lieutenant, I hope to deploy overseas. An important aspect is to understand the local culture in the execution of my duties as an officer. I hope that my intended major of international business helps me gain a deeper understanding of the people I will be interacting with overseas.

Overall, through my experience in visiting both a National Guard and several ROTC programs as well as from my current activities, I understand what it takes to be an Army officer and I am prepared for this challenge.

  • Commentary on what makes this essay successful:

Notice that this essay is not a rundown of what the candidate did in high school or a listing of achievements. This prompt is most effectively answered by showing things that you did to learn more about being both a cadet and an officer in the United States Army.

This can be demonstrated by letting Army ROTC know what research you did on the internet, who you talked to (both cadets and officers) and especially what things you did to visit ROTC programs and actual Army units (such as Army National Guard or Army Reserve Units) to talk with both officers and noncommissioned officers to learn the duties and responsibilities of a lieutenant.

In addition, did you take the time to visit an Army ROTC program? If so, what did you learn? Are you ready for the challenges of Army ROTC? Tell the board members that you took the time to visit and learn more about Army ROTC and are excited about being a cadet.

Examples of Real Essays That Won the ROTC Scholarship!

nrotc scholarship essay examples

Army ROTC Essay #2

State below in the space provided how you spend your time in a typical week during the school year. For example, how many extra hours do you spend: at school, during homework, engaged in athletic activities, engaged in extracurricular activities (i.e. clubs), engaged in volunteer work, or other (explain).

I am a very busy and focus driven individual. From the classroom to the athletic field I am constantly working to hone my skills.

Every day I am up early, whether I have a specific task or just looking to get a head start on the day. I arrive at school an hour early to get academic help, complete assignments, or just relax and get my mind right for the day. This is an important part of my routine.

During a normal day of school, I take countless notes, tests and quizzes as well as attend weekly club meetings. It is almost guaranteed that I will have at least two club meetings per week during break. Some days my lunchtime or study hall time is spent in a teacher’s classroom solidifying my understanding of the subject matter. After the academic day, my real day begins. I have 50 minutes in between my last class and athletic practice to do homework and see teachers. I utilize this time every day even if I don’t have questions in order to gain more insight from there instruction.

As the captain of the varsity cross country team and tennis team, I am tasked with always showing a positive attitude and setting the standard in regard to work ethic. I am responsible for keeping the team focused and working hard. Practice typically lasts for an hour and half depending on the intensity. After cross country, I head straight to tennis practice on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Although tennis practice is only three days a week, it is a year-round commitment for me. I am often on the courts on Tuesdays and Fridays as well when my schoolwork is manageable. My school days last until 7 pm, and then I get to go home.

When I get home and have showered and eaten dinner, I begin my homework and academic preparation for the next day. I often work on papers or projects at this time, and I always manage to spend time with my family. After I have completed everything I need for the next day, I get a good night’s rest and prepare to do it again.

This essay is fairly standard, and it is important to let Army ROTC know that you are a dynamic individual who is busy doing a variety of activities that involve the range of scholar, athlete, leader activities. The more specific you can be about each of these areas, the stronger the essay.

Specifically avoid non-kinetic activities such as playing video games, TV watching, bystanding, or other events where you are not an active participant. Again, emphasize active scholar-athlete-leader events.

Army ROTC Essay #3

Please expand on any additional information outlining scholastic, athletic, and leadership achievements not otherwise annotated in the previous sections. Although you are not required to do so, you are highly encouraged to do so if applicable.

Ronald Reagan Presidential Leadership Institute : I recently had the honor of being selected to attend his Institute. I learned that leadership can mean more than being a role model, it can also mean being an instrument of change. Attending the Institute gave me the chance to meet a leader of a non-profit focusing on preventing drug overdoses. I saw how one person could make a difference and started a chapter on my own high school campus. A lot of students start their encounters with drugs through medications they find at home. I am working with the Behavioral Health Department to obtain kits that neutralize medications. Maybe we can prevent a future tragedy.

Eagle Scout : I was a leader in several capacities. The most challenging was being a leader for a group of new scouts on a camping trip to Death Valley. It was pretty frustrating at first to get everyone to fulfill their jobs, but eventually I helped them understand that we had to work together to make things run smoothly. My Eagle Scout project gave me the chance to oversee a project from start to finish. I built a much-needed library in my temple and it was extremely fulfilling.

Captain of Varsity Lacrosse and Basketball Team : I have also served as a leader for my sports teams. I am proud to be a captain and I take my responsibility seriously. I know my actions have an impact on the other players and am more aware of the need to be a good role model. The most challenging part of being a student athlete is managing my time so I can give school and my sports teams my best effort. I have been named a Scholar Athlete several times which demonstrates that I can manage my time effectively.

This is where you provide Army ROTC your “signature” accomplishments. The top three to four things you are most proud of. List each and then explain in a paragraph why this accomplishment is significant. In this way, you highlight to the selection committee clearly what you are most proud of and what they need to pay attention to. This is where you get to “brag” about yourself.

Final Thoughts on Army ROTC essays:

Essay #1 and Essay #3 are where you make your “money” sat the Army ROTC Scholarship Board. Essay #1 needs to show what effort you put in to learn more about Army ROTC and the duties and responsibilities of an Army lieutenant. Essay #3 is your signature accomplishments to demonstrate why you should be selected for a scholarship over someone else. Make sure you highlight only the most important things you have done.

If you do the above things, you are that much closer to winning an Army ROTC Scholarship!

ROTC Scholarship Consulting provides assistance with your essays as well as other areas of the scholarship application. ROTC Scholarship Consulting has an unparalleled record in helping candidates win ROTC Scholarships. Please take a look at our services for more information .

Want to maximize your potential of earning an Army ROTC Scholarship?

Article contents, examples of real essays that won the rotc scholarship, related posts.

A comprehensive guide to the Air Force ROTC scholarship interview

nrotc scholarship essay examples

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Kirkland (USA, Ret.) is an expert on military admissions and leadership. He served for over 25 years in the United States Army, including stints as an instructor at West Point and as a commander of two Army ROTC programs. He has helped students win ROTC scholarships for 8 years.

Want to earn maximum points on your Army ROTC scholarship essays?

Navy ROTC Sample Letters of Recommendation and Evaluation: Math and Physics Teachers

Navy ROTC Sample Letters of Recommendation and Evaluation: Math and Physics Teachers

Navy ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

Navy ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays

Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays

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COMMENTS

  1. Navy ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

    These essays are important to Navy ROTC. These winning ROTC essay examples highlight several things. Essay #1 needs to show what effort you put in to learn more about Navy ROTC and the duties and responsibilities of an ensign or lieutenant. Essay #2 is your signature accomplishments to demonstrate why you should be selected for a scholarship ...

  2. Winning ROTC Essays Examples

    Army ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary LTC Robert Kirkland 2024-01-24T01:07:40+00:00 Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays Having sat an Army ROTC scholarship board, conducted hundreds of applicant reviews in my role as a PMS and in discussing applicant essay content with my officer colleagues, I wanted to give you my ...

  3. Three Vital Steps to Outstanding ROTC Application Essays

    Having sat an Army ROTC scholarship board, conducted hundreds of applicant reviews in my role as a PMS and in discussing applicant essay content with my officer colleagues, I wanted to give you my observations about what makes the best impression on these essays.. What I am referring to the following essays prompts for the Army and Navy ROTC. I believe these are the most important essays for ...

  4. PDF NROTC Scholarship Application Instructions & Checklist

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  5. NROTC scholarship essay

    Nov 18, 2012. #1. Hello, I'm applying for the NROTC scholarship and am currently writing the first essay. The essay subject is discuss why you want to become a naval officer. I would appreciate greatly appreciate any comments, criticism or suggestions you have. Thank you very much in advance. Naval service runs in my family.

  6. NROTC Marine Option First Essay

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  9. How to Write NROTC Essay

    How to write NROTC essay - 5 essential tips. 1. Present your achievements. Put emphasis on the athletic and academic ones. Your school grades are very important, as the ROTC program trains potential officers and military scientists. Don't forget that as a military scientist you may contribute more to your Fatherland, depending on your ...

  10. Help with NROTC essay?

    In other words, AFROTC recipients can take the scholarship to any college that is approved. The AF doesn't care if one unit has 100%, and another has 0% on scholarship. AFROTC is like NROTC where @85% of scholarships go to STEM/Tech majors. It plays into the equation. Only 5% are given the Full ride, tuition cost covered at any cost.

  11. We just posted an example of...

    The following are winning four-year scholarship essays from Army ROTC applicants we have worked with in the past at ROTC Consulting. We will provide commentary at the end of each essay as to why each answer is effective. You can find our previous post about building a. We just posted an example of winning Army ROTC Scholarship essays.

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    Marine Corps Scholarship Essay. 508 Words3 Pages. NROTC Scholarship Essay The United States Marine Corps is the fiercest fighting force on earth. For years I have dreamt of joining that force. Many people in my family have served in the Armed Forces. Naturally service captured my mind.

  13. 10 Tips for a Successful Army ROTC National Scholarship Application

    Based on this experience we have some tips we recommend to all ROTC National Scholarship applicants to maximize their opportunity to be awarded an ROTC scholarship. 1. Submit Your Application Early: The first scholarship board usually meets in October, the second board in January, and the third board in March. Getting your application completed ...

  14. Preparing for your Navy ROTC Scholarship Interview

    The NROTC scholarship interview evaluates the applicant's suitability for the program and potential to become an effective naval officer. Students preparing for their NROTC scholarship interview should be informed about the following: The mission of NROTC and the Navy. Self-Preparation for the Interview. Interview Questions to Expect.

  15. Marine NROTC Essay : r/NROTC

    Marine NROTC Essay. Hey all, I'm applying for the Marine NROTC scholarship and just finished my first essay. The prompt is "Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Marine Officer. Specifically, comment on leadership positions you've held, the challenges you have faced and the lessons you have learned".

  16. My NROTC essay

    Nov 16, 2008. #1. So my recruiter told me that if I have my app in before this weekend is over, I can make the Dec. 8 boards. So, I've been working to get it done and finalize all my decisions regarding college. I like to think a bit too much about things, and have been making sure this is what I want to do. It is.

  17. NROTC Essay Questions

    206. Jul 20, 2017. #1. On the NROTC application, under the Essays tab, there are about 4 main fields to fill in. The first being the essay about why you want to be an officer, etc. and that allows for 2500 characters. However, the two following - one about living abroad and the other about diversity in your family situation, both allow for 2500 ...

  18. NROTC Essays

    I am applying for the NROTC Scholarship and would like any advice you have to offer on my two essay. 1. Discuss your reasons for wanting to become a Marine Officer. I desire to become a Marine Officer foremost to serve my country, there is no greater honor than serving your country as a Marine in the Corps. Secondly, becoming a Marine Officer will help me enhance myself both physically and ...

  19. As the first national scholarship board approaches, is there ...

    Similarly, the summer internship applications for ROTC were due this past Friday. My first essay was aids, so my Master Sergeant gave me feedback/advice to fix my essay (which turned out better I think). I will now give you the tips that he gave me. First: you need to tell them why you deserve the scholarship (or whatever the prompt is).

  20. How to Write a Scholarship Essay

    Yes, but make sure your essay directly addresses the prompt, respects the word count, and demonstrates the organization's values. If you plan ahead, you can save time by writing one scholarship essay for multiple prompts with similar questions. In a scholarship tracker spreadsheet, you can group or color-code overlapping essay prompts; then, write a single essay for multiple scholarships.

  21. Navy ROTC Teacher Sample Letters of Recommendation: Math & Physics

    August 15th, 2023. February 10th, 2023. One of the requirements for the Navy ROTC Scholarship is an evaluation and written narrative from a Math teacher and one other evaluation from a teacher, counselor, coach or employer. Navy ROTC teacher evaluations can be overwhelming for prospective candidates. Below we provide samples for each teacher as ...

  22. 14 Scholarship Essay Examples That Won Thousands 2023

    National Association of University Women Scholarship Essay Examples by Isabella Mendez-Figueroa. Prompt: Please explain how your experience volunteering and participating in community service has shaped your perspective on humanity. Elaborate on how these experiences have influenced your future ambitions and career choice.

  23. Army ROTC Essay Examples with Commentary

    Army ROTC Essay #2 Prompt: State below in the space provided how you spend your time in a typical week during the school year. For example, how many extra hours do you spend: at school, during homework, engaged in athletic activities, engaged in extracurricular activities (i.e. clubs), engaged in volunteer work, or other (explain).