Video Worksheet for Discovery Video Understanding Electricity

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Bridge Course Class 8th Science

Course: bridge course class 8th science   >   unit 3, intro to charge.

  • Activity: Fun with plastic straws
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  • Repulsion and attraction between objects
  • Activity: Attracting neutral objects
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Video transcript

Colorado State University

College of natural sciences, little shop of physics, everything you need to know about electricity.

Everything You Need to Know About Electricity

What happens when you plug a pickle into an electrical outlet? Just what is the “static” that makes your socks stick together when they come out of the dryer? Here we’ll explore electric charges, forces, and fields.

Electricity is almost certainly an integral part of your daily life. But how much do you know about the stuff that powers the screen you’re reading this on? On this page we’ve assembled a variety of resources to help you guide your students in an exploration of the principles of electric fields, potential difference (voltage), and electric current.

First, let’s establish some definitions and key principles. The basic physical units of electricity are charges . These entities can be positive or negative; there is a repulsive force between like charges and an attractive force between opposite charges. These are not two different forces, but rather a single long-range electric force (F elec ); its agent is the electric field (E), a property of the region around a charge. The electric field increases in strength with decreasing distance from a charge, as does the electric force — stronger electric fields exert larger electric forces on charges. The electric fields of positive and negative charges are almost identical except for the crucial difference that they exert forces in opposite directions on a nearby charge of a given species (positive or negative). We’ll define everything we talk about from here on out in terms of positive charges — not the most convenient convention, as we’ll see, but a nearly universal one.

Because there is a repulsive force between like charges, you’d have to do work (W, energy input) to bring a positive test charge (a charge we imagine placing at different points to examine their properties) near another positive charge — the test charge wouldn’t move that way spontaneously; you’d have to somehow push it there. The work you’d have to do on the test charge would be converted to electric potential energy (U elec ) of the test charge. Since a positive test charge would have a high U elec if it was pushed near a positive charge, we say that the region around the positive charge is one of high electric potential (V), regardless of whether another charge is actually present.  

Similarly, you wouldn’t have to do any work to bring a positive test charge near a negative test charge. In fact, since there is an attractive force between opposite charges, the positive test charge would (in the absence of opposing forces) accelerate toward the negative charge. The positive test charge, then, gains kinetic energy (K) at the expense of U elec as it nears the negative charge. We thus define the region around a negative charge as one of low V (again, whether or not there’s actually another charge present is irrelevant).

When positive charges are separated from negative charges, we say there is a potential difference , or voltage (∆V), across the region in between the positive and negative charges. Because the positive and negative charges are separated from one another, there is a net E in this region. It exerts a force on negative charges such that they are pushed away from other negative charges and toward positive charges, and vice-versa for positive charges. If the E exists in a conductor (a material in which charges don’t experience much resistance to their movement; compare with an insulator , in which the movement of charges is strongly inhibited), and if there is a conducting path through which the charges can return from whence they came (i.e., a complete circuit ), there will be an electric current (I) — a flow of charges — in the region across which the ∆V is present. In reality, it is electrons (negative charges) which are free to roam in conductors; the protons (positive charges) are bound in atomic nuclei. However, it is conventional to define current as the flow of positive charges in diagrams and calculations, so we say that current flows from high V to low V (even though you know electrons are actually pushed from low to high V!).

We’re glad you’re still reading, because now we’re finally ready to answer our initial question: How does electricity power all our stuff? We know that as charges flow from high to low V, their U elec is converted to K. Now, consider the case of water flowing downhill (as it does this, its gravitational potential energy, U g , is converted to K): We can divert the flow and convert some of its energy to useful W for our own purposes instead of simply becoming K in the water. We can do much the same with an electric current as it flow from high to low V! The LEDs in your computer screen convert the energy in the electric current to photon energy, your toaster converts it to thermal energy… With this, we now know enough to jump into some explorations and experiments.

Application

What follows is a series of videos that can help you guide your students to an understanding of the basic principles of electricity. We’ve organized the videos in terms of “the 5 E’s”: Engage, Explore, Explain, Extend, and Evaluate. This structure has worked well for us in teacher workshops, and we hope it works well for you too! However, we always welcome your feedback. Please contact us anytime to let us know what’s working, what’s not, and how we can make this resource more useful for you. Enjoy!

The purpose of the Engage segment is to pique students’ interest. We don’t need to directly transmit concepts at this stage, merely give students a chance to think and get excited about the topic we’ll be discussing.

Video 1: Electric Pickle

If you do this demonstration yourself, DO NOT attempt it unless you have a GFI-protected cord!

A surprising and visually striking demonstration of electric current and power. When you plug into a wall outlet, one prong of the plug, and thus one wire, is “hot” (at high V); the other is “grounded” (at zero V), so current flows from the hot wire, through the electrical device it’s connected to, then back through the grounded wire, completing the circuit. To minimize the risk involved in this demonstration, we used a ground fault interruptor (GFI)-protected cable, such as that found on a hairdryer. After relieving the cable of the device it was connected to, we stripped the ends of each wire to bare the metal conductors inside the insulating coating. We then stuck each wire into one end of a medium-size whole pickle, thus creating a potential difference across it. The pickle is full of salty fluids — i.e., it’s a decent electrical conductor — so a current will flow across it. Some of the energy in the current is converted to thermal energy in the pickle, and some of it causes ionization of sodium atoms in the pickle. The result is a steaming pickle full of flashing yellow light!

Again: DO NOT do this with a non-GFI-protected cord! The GFI constantly tests the current in the two wires. If the amount of current headed back to the outlet from the device doesn’t match the amount sent into the device, indicating that something other than the device (for example, a human) has created a new conducting path to ground (i.e., if there is a ground fault), the GFI will immediately cut off the current from the outlet. A non-GFI-protected cord offers no such safeguard.

Video 2: Graphite Glow

An easy and surprising demonstration of the properties and effects of electric current. First, we connect four 9-volt batteries to one another to produce a ∆V of 36 volts. Then we attach one end of each of two alligator clips to a piece of 0.3mm mechanical pencil lead. Finally, attach the other end of one alligator clip to the free negative terminal, and the other end of the second alligator clip to the free positive terminal. Almost immediately, the segment of pencil lead between the clips will begin to glow and smoke (though you may have to adjust the spacing of the clips to get the best effect). The pencil “lead” is actually composed primarily of graphite; graphite is reasonably good at conducting electricity, but not nearly as good as the metal wires of the alligator clips. Thus the graphite acts as a resistor — it impedes the flow of electricity — and energy in the current is dissipated as thermal energy in the graphite.

In the explore segment, students get to experience firsthand the principles we hope to teach them. We still don’t need to explicitly describe any concepts yet — the students will start working these out as they explore.

Video 1: StaticSaurus

The construction of this project is a bit more involved, but it’s a fine exploration of the electric field. We connected the gate of a JFET transistor to a screw and completed an LED circuit by connecting the negative end of the LED to the transistor drain, the positive end of the LED to the positive end of a battery pack, and the negative end of the battery pack to the transistor source. Normally, the transistor doesn’t let current flow in this circuit, so the LED is off. But an electric field can flip the state of the transistor gate, allowing current to flow and turning the LED on. Where might you find an electric field? The easiest source is static electricity. Static electricity occurs when molecular bonds between surfaces are broken (e.g., due to the surfaces rubbing against one another). If one surface has a slightly higher affinity for electrons than the other, the former will leave the interaction negatively charged, the latter, positively charged. There is thus a net electric field — capable of turning on the LED — around each surface. This helps students begin to develop a sense of the electric field — when something is “charge-y,” the space around it is affected; this can have real effects on other electrical entities even if there’s no physical contact.

Video 2: Human-Powered Clock

Remember the electric pickle? Turns out, the human body is full of salty fluid too. This means that you and your students are all reasonable conductors of electricity. We can demonstrate this by incorporating you into a circuit with copper and galvanized steel pipe, a small battery-powered clock, and some wire. Galvanized steel is coated with zinc, which “wants” electrons less than copper does (i.e., zinc is less electronegative than copper). If there is a conducting path between a zinc surface and a copper one, a ∆V will be established and current will flow between them — current that, in this case, will power the clock. To accomplish this, you’ll wire one piece of galvanized steel pipe to the negative end of the battery connection in the clock (using solder or aluminum tape); wire one piece of copper pipe to the positive connection. Finally, wire a second piece of galvanized steel pipe to a second piece of copper pipe. Now, find two students and have each hold one copper pipe and one galvanized steel pipe — this completes the circuit, and the clock will turn on! (Make sure that one student isn’t holding both of the pipes that connect to the clock — though perhaps with your particular clock, this is sufficient! Experiment with it.)

assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

Video 3: Electricity Part 3

Recall from the second Engage video that graphite, the stuff inside a pencil, is an electrical conductor. This means there’s a very simple, inexpensive way for your students to experiment with electrical circuits — just draw them! Any sort of paper will work, but we’ve found that it’s easiest to get enough graphite on the paper to make things go if you use a soft-leaded art pencil. In this video we use an “energy ball” toy with wires electrically connected (using aluminum tape) to the metal tabs you’re meant to place your fingers on as a probe of electrical conductivity. This is one option; another is to use a 9-volt battery as the power source in the circuit. If using the battery, a line will not suffice — students will need to draw a 2D shape (e.g., a circle or a square) and leave a small gap where they’ll touch the battery terminals to complete the circuit. Students can then use a multimeter to measure potential differences around the circuit, so this version of the activity lends itself well to more quantitative exploration of the electric field, the properties of resistors, and series and parallel circuits.

Now it’s time to codify and formalize the students’ observations. The following videos can help you elucidate and demonstrate the basic concepts underlying the discoveries students made as they explored.

Video: Electricity Part 1

An EveryDay Science introduction to the concepts of electric current and electric potential, and the idea that the transformation of energy which occurs as charges flow from high to low potential is what allows us to power devices in electric circuits. We demonstrate these phenomena on the by incorporating a couple of people into a circuit, a nice connection to the Human-Powered Clock students explored earlier.

Once the basic principles are clear, we want to encourage students to expand their thinking and ask questions that go beyond the scope of what we’ve already discussed.

Video 1: World’s Simplest Motor

A important corollary to the basic properties of electricity discussed thus far, and a demonstration that can serve as both an Extend to this topic and an Engage if you’re teaching magnetism next. (If this is the case, you’ll of course also want to check out Everything You Need to Know About Magnetism.) Electricity and magnetism are inextricably linked. Moving charges — i.e., electric currents — create magnetic fields which, analogous to electric fields, are the agent of the magnetic force. This means that a current-carrying wire will exert a force on a magnet (and vice-versa, of course) — a principle easily demonstrated with a battery, a magnet, a screw, and some wire.

Video 2: Horseshoe Magnet

A classic electromagnet. If you’re teaching magnetism after you wrap up with electricity, you’ll want this one on hand! As noted above, electric currents create magnetic fields. If you wrap a wire many times around a material that can be magnetized (in this project we use an iron horseshoe), then pass an electric current through the wire, you create a strong magnetic field inside the material, thus turning it into a magnet. This electromagnet will interact with other magnets and pick up other objects which can be magnetized — but only when current is flowing!

assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

It’s important to figure out what students understand after the first four E’s. Tests and quizzes are one option, but there are many others.

This one is up to you — what works best for you and your students? We, for example, have had good results with turning the tables and letting the students make a video at this stage. We’d love to hear what works in your classroom!

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Teach With Fergy

Education Through Engagement and Application

Day-By-Day Classroom Breakdown – Electricity – Current and Static

Electricity – Current and Static Day-By-Day Walkthrough

Day by day

Any word that is blue links to a specific resource. Simply click it to be taken to the file.

——————————————————————

Click below to visit the different units I’ve posted.

Introduction Unit

Introductory Chemistry

Electricity  

__________________________________________________

Electricity Unit – Current and Static

Class starter – A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science –  Amazing Energy Facts .  What I do and find effective, is while they are watching the video, I ask them to write down anything that really stands out to them. If needed, I will show it again. Once the video is done, we discuss what they found interesting.

– I followed my discussion with a quick introduction on my  Electricity Unit. Click here to have a look at what I’ll be covering.

Electricity Unit 1

– We then started  Lesson 1 – Electricity and Current

L 1 Electricity 1

–  Homework:  No homework

Class starter – A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science –  Why Do Paper Cuts Hurt So Much?  

– We then completed  Lesson 1 – Electricity and Current

–  Homework:  Two items.

1) To ensure my class comprehends Lesson 1 before we move onto the more difficult circuit diagrams, I will give them a quiz next day on the lesson.

2) The last slide of the lesson asks the students to find 3 particular items around their home, write the name of the item down and bring it to class next day for discussion.

We started today’s class with a quiz on lesson 1.

– We then completed  Lesson 2 – Solving Circuit Diagrams

assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

–  Homework:  No homework for tonight.

Today I started by giving out Electricity Production Summative Assignment  In it, students work in groups to research a certain electricity production system (nuclear, fossil fuels, solar, etc.) and showcase it via a presentation. 

After I gave out the project we spent our time building circuits and solving circuit diagrams. Both worksheets can be found in Lesson 2 – Solving Circuit Diagrams .   

–  Homework:  Students were to finish solving their circuit diagram questions and start thinking about their  Electricity Production Summative Assignment .

Today was all about the Lab Stations. Over the last while, I’ve been putting together these lab station activities to create more engagement for my students. They move from one station to another for the entire period and they love it. Today’s Lab Station Activity was on Current Electricity and Circuit Diagrams .

Circuits 1

–  Homework:  Students should be working on their  Electricity Production Summative Assignment .

Class starter – A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science –  Can we have star wars lightsabers in real life?  

– We then completed  Lesson 3 – Resistance

L 4 Electricity 1

–  Homework:   Ohm’s Law Worksheet

Class starter – A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science –  What is a GMO – Jimmy Kimmel Live

– Today we were working on more complicated circuit diagrams. The PowerPoint can be downloaded by clicking here –>  Solving Electrical Circuits .

–  Homework:  Finish the  Solving Electrical Circuits .

Class starter – A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science –  Science STYLE Cover – Taylor Swift Acapella Parody

– Today we started by reviewing the solving Circuit Diagram PowerPoint from yesterday –>  Solving Electrical Circuits .

–  We then moved into Lesson 5 – Power, Electrical Energy and Efficiency .

L 3 Electricity 1

–  Homework:  Finish their  Electricity Production Summative Assignment .

– No Video today as we started with a quiz on Lessons 1, 2, 3 and 5

–  We then moved into Lesson 6 – Electrical Safety in the Home

L 7 Safety 1

–  Homework:  

Human Response to Electric Shock Worksheet

Home Electricity Worksheet

Finish their  Electricity Production Summative Assignment .

Class starter – A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science –  ASAP Science Wars .

Today was presentation day 1 for their  Electricity Production Summative Assignment .

I never let them present for the entire period because I feel the audience loses interest and therefore, doesn’t take in as much as they would otherwise. To combat this, I started on Lesson 8 – Static Electricity .

L 8 static 1

Today was similar to yesterday although today I didn’t do a class starter video as I wanted to jump right into the  Electricity Production Presentations and complete a little more of  Lesson 8 – Static Electricity .

As I did yesterday, I allowed for 3 presentations and then jumped into the lesson. 

Today was all about the Lab Stations. Over the last while, I’ve been putting together these lab station activities to create more engagement for my students. They move from one station to another for the entire period and they love it. Today’s Lab Station Activity was on Static Electricity. CLICK HERE for more details.

Static 1

–  Homework:  Study for the test tomorrow.

Test Day. The test I use along with the answer key can be found in my   Electricity Unit. CLICK HERE for more information.

Electricity Unit 1

FREE K-12 standards-aligned STEM

curriculum for educators everywhere!

Find more at TeachEngineering.org .

  • TeachEngineering
  • Electrifying the World

Lesson Electrifying the World

Grade Level: 4 (3-5)

Time Required: 1 hour

Lesson Dependency: None

Subject Areas: Physical Science, Science and Technology

NGSS Performance Expectations:

NGSS Three Dimensional Triangle

  • Print lesson and its associated curriculum

Activities Associated with this Lesson Units serve as guides to a particular content or subject area. Nested under units are lessons (in purple) and hands-on activities (in blue). Note that not all lessons and activities will exist under a unit, and instead may exist as "standalone" curriculum.

  • Lights On Demo & Build! Intro to Simple Circuits

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Engineering connection, learning objectives, more curriculum like this, introduction/motivation, associated activities, lesson closure, vocabulary/definitions, user comments & tips.

Engineers help design and create healthier tomorrows

The introduction to circuits is actually an introduction to electrical engineering. Every electrical device has a circuit designed by electrical engineers.

After this lesson, students should be able to:

  • Explain which direction current flows through a circuit.
  • Compare and contrast a parallel and a series circuit.
  • Describe how current flows through a parallel and a series circuit.

Educational Standards Each TeachEngineering lesson or activity is correlated to one or more K-12 science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) educational standards. All 100,000+ K-12 STEM standards covered in TeachEngineering are collected, maintained and packaged by the Achievement Standards Network (ASN) , a project of D2L (www.achievementstandards.org). In the ASN, standards are hierarchically structured: first by source; e.g. , by state; within source by type; e.g. , science or mathematics; within type by subtype, then by grade, etc .

Ngss: next generation science standards - science, international technology and engineering educators association - technology.

View aligned curriculum

Do you agree with this alignment? Thanks for your feedback!

State Standards

North carolina - science.

Ask students what they know about electricity. Ask them to list various examples of electrical energy.

Talk about Benjamin Franklin and his interest in electricity (that is, the lightning hitting the kite experiment). If they are not familiar with this experiment, read aloud to the class a description of the story.

Repulsion and attraction.

Lesson Background and Concepts for Teachers

All matter is made up of atoms. An atom consists of a nucleus in the center, which is comprised of positively charged and uncharged particles. The uncharged particles are called neutrons and the positively charged particles are called protons. Surrounding the nucleus are negatively charged particles called electrons. There are an equal number of protons and electrons. Refer to Figure 1, an animation of an atom. The nucleus is represented in the center by the red and yellow dots, and the electrons are represented by the blue dots.

Something important to remember is that opposite charges attract one another and like charges repel one another. In other words, protons are attracted to electrons and repelled by other protons. Likewise, electrons are attracted to protons and repelled by other electrons.

This phenomenon is caused by what is known as an electric force. Most matter has no overall electrical charge because of the balance between the number of protons and electrons. However, when the balance of the electrical force between protons and electrons is disturbed by another force (e.g. magnetic forces) an atom may gain or lose an electrical charge. When this occurs, the atom will either have an overall negative or overall positive charge. The atom in this state is now called an ion. Now that the atom has an overall electrical charge it will interact with other charged ions in the same manner as described earlier. In other words, oppositely charged ions will attract one another, and like ions will repel one another.

The loss in electrical charge from an atom allows for the free movement of electrons. The movement of electrons creates what is called current. Electricity is a source of power generated from the flow of electrical current. When a material called a conductor is placed between two charged objects, the loose electrons are pushed away by the negatively charged object, and the electrons are then drawn into the positively charged object. There are many different types of conductors. An example of a good conductor is metal, which is the reason why wiring is made out of metal. Water is also a conductor, and since the human body contains a lot of water, it is too!

A path through which electrical current can flow is called a circuit. An example of some simple circuits can be seen below. Essentially circuits work in the following way. A power source will pump electrons from the positive terminal to the negative terminal at a faster rate, then a device connected to the power source can drain the electrons. The electrical energy provided will continue as long as the power source does not stop. In the case of the circuits below, chemical reactions within the battery pumps electrons from the positive terminal to the negative terminal faster than the light bulb connected to the battery can drain them. The battery continues to supply the required amount of current to light the light bulbs until the chemicals within the battery are used up. Once the chemical reactions cease to occur the battery is dead and must be replaced.

Two different types of circuits are series and parallel circuits. A series circuit is a circuit in which the components (e.g. lights) are connected in line with one another and the wire. In other words, a series circuit contains components that all "share" the same wire. A series circuit does not contain any three or more wire junctions. However, a parallel circuit is a different matter. It's a circuit in which there are junctions of three or more wires. Components don't "share" the same wire, instead each component has it's own wire. When examining circuits, engineers often use pictures called circuit diagrams. Circuit diagrams are used to illustrate the pathways through which electricity can flow.

As stated earlier, electricity travels through conductors. A break in the wiring stops the flow of electrical current. For instance, in the series circuit shown below, the flow of current is stopped after the first light by the break in the wiring. Since there is a break in the wire, none of the lights will light up.

For a parallel circuit, current has more then one path through which it can flow. As seen from the figure below, this particular parallel circuit has three different paths through which it can travel (path 1: red, path 2: blue, path 3: green). This means that if there is a break in the wire at point A in the diagram, the first and the third light bulb will still light, but the second light bulb will not. This is because current is still able to reach the other two light bulbs to light them.

Essentially, the main point to remember here is that as long as current has a path to travel, current will flow through the circuit. When the current can not flow, this is called static electricity. Refer to the Lights On Demo & Build! Intro to Simple Circuits activity to have students expand their knowledge by creating their own circuits.

  • Lights On Demo & Build! Intro to Simple Circuits - Students build a simple circuit. They explore how current flows through the circuit and compare the differences between a parallel and a series circuit.

Close by asking the class questions like "What is a parallel circuit?" Expect students to know the basic information from this lesson.

circuit: A path through which electrical current can flow.

circuit diagram: An illustrative picture used to explain the paths through which electricity can flow.

conductor: A material that allows for electrical current to flow.

current: The flow of electricity through a conductor.

electricity: A source of power generated from the flow of electrical current.

electron: A small, atomic particle with a negative charge.

energy: The ability to do work.

  • Ask students to give examples of electrical energy throughout the lesson.
  • Make sure students understand what electricity is by displaying various pictures of electrical and non-electrical devices at the end of the lesson. Have them decide which pictures are examples of the use of electrical energy and which ones use another type of energy.
  • Draw a simple circuit diagram and have student explain the path in which current flows through the circuit.
  • Ask students why their hair was attracted to the balloon. (Answer: Electrons had moved from their hair to the balloon, causing the balloon to have a negative charge, and the hair a positive charge. OPPOSITES ATTRACT so the balloon wants to move to the hair.)

Schematic of Electrostatic Potential in a Storm Cloud (Makings of Lightning)

This lesson introduces the concept of electricity by asking students to imagine what their life would be like without electricity. Students learn that electrons can move between atoms, leaving atoms in a charged state.

preview of 'Lights Out!' Lesson

Students learn about current electricity and necessary conditions for the existence of an electric current. Students construct a simple electric circuit and a galvanic cell to help them understand voltage, current and resistance.

preview of 'Electrons on the Move' Lesson

Students are introduced to several key concepts of electronic circuits. They learn about some of the physics behind circuits, the key components in a circuit and their pervasiveness in our homes and everyday lives.

preview of 'Circuits' Lesson

Students are introduced to the concept of electricity by identifying it as an unseen, but pervasive and important presence in their lives. They compare conductors and insulators based on their capabilities for electron flow. Then water and electrical systems are compared as an analogy to electrical ...

preview of 'What Is Electricity?' Lesson

Benjamin Franklin and Discovery of Electricity, The American Revolution. Accessed 7/23/2007. http://www.americanrevolution.com/BenjaminFranklinElectricity.htm

Comparing Parallel and Series Circuits, Applied Science: Our Technological World. Accessed 7/23/2007. http://www.msnucleus.org/membership/html/k-6/as/technology/4/ast4_3a.html

Electricity Tutorial, Swanson Technologies. Accessed 7/23/2007. http://www.swansontec.com/set.html

Contributors

Supporting program, acknowledgements.

This content was developed by the MUSIC (Math Understanding through Science Integrated with Curriculum) Program in the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University under National Science Foundation GK-12 grant no. DGE 0338262. However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policies of the NSF, and you should not assume endorsement by the federal government.

Last modified: June 6, 2019

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  • Ecological footprint
  • Polar bear reading
  • Experimental design: Paper helicopters
  • Assignment 1.1: The DDT Story
  • Energy pyramid & food web anchor chart
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  • Crash Course Cycles questions (flipped)
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  • Assignment 1.2: Zebra mussels
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  • Exam review sheets: SNC1D1 SNC1D3-01

Electricity

  • Electrostatics lab
  • Electricity and matter
  • Charging by friction
  • Charging by friction hw
  • Charging by contact
  • Charging by induction
  • Charging by induction questions
  • Conductors and insulators
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  • Electrostatics review
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  • Current electricity PEOE
  • Current electricity
  • Circuit symbols
  • Circuits bw
  • Current, charge, and time calculations
  • Series circuits PEOE
  • Series circuits
  • Parallel circuits
  • Parallel circuit diagrams
  • Ohm Run and resistance questions
  • Summative Assessment: Seminar
  • Worksheets: Particle Theory of Matter
  • Worksheets: Changes of state
  • Worksheets: Classification of matter
  • Worksheets: Classification of matter questions
  • Reading: Physical and chemical properties of matter
  • Worksheets: Identifying Physical and Chemical Properties
  • Assignment 2.1: Identification of Mixtures & Properties of Matter and online form
  • Lab: Chromotography and online form
  • First 36 elements mnemonic
  • How to count atoms (EDPuzzle)
  • Counting atoms practice 2
  • History of the atomic model (EDPuzzle)
  • Assignment 3.2: He reading (online; see Notes)
  • Lab 3.2: Metals/nonmetal (online: see notes)
  • Activity: Behaving like Mendeleev
  • Worksheets: Trends in the periodic table
  • Worksheets: PTE review
  • Notes: Types of bonds
  • ...........The Element Information Form must also be completed
  • ...........You must sign up for an element first
  • ...........The rubric
  • Review sheets: Chemistry part two
  • ............ answers
  • What do you know about space?
  • Lab design: Factors affecting craters
  • Movement of the Moon part 1
  • Movement of the Moon part 2
  • Movement of the Sun
  • Moon phases
  • Meet your solar system
  • Assignment 2.1: Scale Model of the Solar System + info sheets for the Asteroid and Kuiper Belts
  • Assignment 2.2: Sedna reading
  • Lab 1.1: Making Craters
  • Retrograde motion activity
  • The Sun and stars
  • Spectroscopy notes
  • Spectroscopy practice
  • Star stuff work sheet
  • Lab 1.2: Spectroscopy (version A | B | C )
  • Galaxies bw
  • Expansion activity
  • Space technology presentation handouts (just print out the first 2 pages) | Section 02 | 1D3 04 -->
  • Assignment 1.5: Satellite design

Introduction to Science

  • Science diagnostic
  • Safety sheets, WHMIS & HHPS
  • Safety questions
  • Safety crossword
  • Lab equipment
  • Experimental design: terminology & practice
  • Experimental design: Dry lab
  • Measurement and precision

Assignments & Labs

Assignments and labs will only be available online after they have been assigned in class. See Class Calendar on the menu at left for due dates.

Assignments

Discovery Education

Prepare learners for tomorrow through curiosity, engagement, and real-world experiences.

IMAGES

  1. Science: Electricity questions

    assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

  2. Electricity Unit Review Answers

    assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

  3. NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Science Chapter 12 Electricity (Updated 2020)

    assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

  4. The Discovery of Electricity (14_slides)

    assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

  5. Current Electricity- NEET Previous Year Questions with Complete Solutions

    assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

  6. 3. CURRENT ELECTRICITY QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS/EXERCISE

    assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions

VIDEO

  1. NEET Direct 12th Assignment Solution (Current Electricity-l)

  2. Lesson on Energy/Electricity

  3. Module 4 Electricity and Magnetism Q1 Charge, potential difference, and potential energy example

  4. Science Year 2

  5. energy density in an electric field| physics 3rd sem important questions

  6. Schalk Bezuidenhout on Discovery Bank’s discounts

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Understanding: Electricity

    Assignment Discovery School Lesson Plan DiscoverySchool.com 1 Objectives Students will • research one of three professions related to electricity; • write a story about performing this job; and • share their ideas with their classmates. Materials • Paper and pencils • Computer with Internet access • Understanding: Electricity video ...

  2. Understanding Electricity Video Questions 2011.2012.pdf

    View Understanding Electricity Video Questions, 2011.2012.pdf from PHYS 1422 at Sam Houston State University. ... "Assignment Discovery: Understanding Electricity" Video Questions ~31 minutes. AI Homework Help. Expert Help. Study Resources. ... "Assignment Discovery: Understanding Electricity" Video Questions 10 pts. ~31 minutes Name: ...

  3. Video Worksheet for Discovery Video Understanding Electricity

    It can be found at Discovery Education (formally United Streaming). This sheet goes with the 6th grade-8th grade version. I have also included an answer key to the worksheet. Video Worksheet for Discovery Education Video Understanding Electricity by Lauren McVey is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 ...

  4. What Is Electricity?

    Students are introduced to the concept of electricity by identifying it as an unseen, but pervasive and important presence in their lives. They are also introduced to the idea of engineers making, controlling and distributing electricity. The main concepts presented are the science of electricity and the careers that involve an understanding of electricity. Students first review the structure ...

  5. Static electricity

    Static electricity: Unit test; ... Relationship between electric force, charge, and distance Get 3 of 4 questions to level up! ... Explore electrostatics. Learn. Discovery of triboelectric effect (Opens a modal) Pith ball electroscope (Opens a modal) Foil leaf electroscope (Opens a modal) Electrostatic telegraphs (case study) (Opens a modal)

  6. Lights Out!

    In this lesson, students engage in the science and engineering practices of making observations and asking questions to make sense of the phenomenon of electricity. They learn about two main forms of electricity, static and current, and that electrons can move between atoms, leaving atoms in a charged state. Students discover the disciplinary ...

  7. Put a Spark in It!

    Day 1: Lights Out! lesson. Day 2: Static Cling activity. Day 3: Take Charge! All About Static Electricity lesson. Day 4: Charge It! All About Electrical Attraction and Repulsion activity and Build a Charge Detector activity. Day 5: Electrons on the Move lesson. Day 6: Completing the Circuit activity. Day 7: Two-Cell Battery activity.

  8. discovery school

    Understanding Electricity Video Questions, 2011.2012.pdf. Sam Houston State University. PHYS 1422

  9. Electricity: Quiz 1

    Learn for free about math, art, computer programming, economics, physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, finance, history, and more. Khan Academy is a nonprofit with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere.

  10. Intro to charge (video)

    Electrons and protons have equal charges which is why the atom as a whole is neutral. Plus annihilation only occurs when 2 particles have the same mass but opposite charge. The mass of a proton (1.67 X 10^-27) is not equal to the mass of an electron (9.1 X 10^-31). Annihilation occurs between electron and positron, and proton and antiproton ...

  11. Everything You Need to Know About Electricity

    On this page we've assembled a variety of resources to help you guide your students in an exploration of the principles of electric fields, potential difference (voltage), and electric current. Theory. First, let's establish some definitions and key principles. The basic physical units of electricity are charges.

  12. Day-By-Day Classroom Breakdown

    Electricity Unit - Current and Static. Day 1: Class starter - A minds-on fun science video to get them focused and thinking science - Amazing Energy Facts. What I do and find effective, is while they are watching the video, I ask them to write down anything that really stands out to them. If needed, I will show it again.

  13. Is It Shocking?

    To better understand electricity, students investigate the properties of materials based on their ability to dispel static electricity. They complete a lab worksheet, collect experimental data, and draw conclusions based on their observations and understanding of electricity. The activity provides hands-on learning experience to safely explore the concept of static electricity, learning what ...

  14. Introduction to Electricity Worksheet

    A worksheet that explores the concept of electricity. Use this educational worksheet when introducing the concept of electricity in the upper years. Students answer four questions that are designed to give them a basic understanding of the underlying principles of electricity. This teaching resource could be used as part of a lesson, unit or ...

  15. Current Electricity

    Discovers what makes electricity flow by examining the three components needed to make an electric circuit work. View Citations Prepare learners for tomorrow through curiosity, engagement, and real-world experiences.

  16. PHYS 1422 : Introduction To Physics II LAB

    Understanding Electricity Video Questions, 2011.2012.pdf "Assignment Discovery: Understanding Electricity" Video Questions ~31 minutes Name:_Hr.:_ Yash Dalal 4 _ PART 1 (about 25 minutes) 1. What is the voltage between your head and toes?_ 200 V — 300 V 2. What occurs when there is enough of a voltage d

  17. PDF Learning about Professions Related to Electricity

    Discovery School video on unitedstreaming: Understanding Electricity Search for this video by using the video title (or a portion of it) as the keyword. Selected clips that support this lesson plan: Electricity's Power Part One Electricity's Power Part Two Paper and pencils Computer with Internet access Procedures 1.

  18. Get the free understanding electricity video questions form

    Rate free assignment discovery understanding electricity video questions form. 4.6. Satisfied. 42 Votes. For pdfFiller's FAQs. ... Understanding electricity video questions are typically questions posed to students or viewers after watching a video that explains the basics of electricity. These questions aim to assess the viewer's ...

  19. Electrifying the World

    circuit diagram: An illustrative picture used to explain the paths through which electricity can flow. conductor: A material that allows for electrical current to flow. current: The flow of electricity through a conductor. electricity: A source of power generated from the flow of electrical current. electron: A small, atomic particle with a ...

  20. Assignment Discovery Understanding Electricity Video Questions

    Now, working with a Assignment Discovery Understanding Electricity Video Questions takes at most 5 minutes. Our state web-based samples and crystal-clear instructions remove human-prone errors. Adhere to our easy steps to have your Assignment Discovery Understanding Electricity Video Questions prepared quickly: Pick the web sample from the library.

  21. Static Electricity

    About this Full Video. Examines the effects of friction when different objects rub against each other: the electrons from one object are transferred to the other object. This leads to a buildup of electrical charge on an object. View Citations.

  22. Ms. McPhee's SNC1D Handouts

    Worksheets: Classification of matter questions. Reading: Physical and chemical properties of matter. Worksheets: Identifying Physical and Chemical Properties. Assignment 2.1: Identification of Mixtures & Properties of Matter and online form. Lab: Chromotography and online form. First 36 elements mnemonic. Density. How to count atoms (EDPuzzle)

  23. Assignment Discovery: Cells

    About this Full Video. It's been more than 350 years since the microscope was invented, but scientists still use it to see the world at a different scale. Take a larger-than-life look at human and plant cells, and watch these tiny building blocks of life in action. Observe how the body repairs damaged cells after an encounter with boiling ...