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DK Biography: Helen Keller

Paperback cover of DK Biography: Helen Keller

Published by DK Children

By annie tremmel wilcox, leslie garrett, rrp:  ca$8.99, about dk biography: helen keller.

Tells the inspirational tale of the spirited crusader, Helen Keller.

In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today. Full-color photographs of people, places, and artifacts, definitions of key words, and sidebars on related subjects add dimension and relevance to stories of famous lives that students will love to read.

Helen Keller Biography

  • Helen Keller Early Childhood
  • Meeting Anne Sullivan
  • Helen Keller's First Words
  • Education and Literary Career
  • Political and Social Activism
  • Worldwide Celebrity

Where Was Helen Keller Born?

Portrait: Helen Keller

Helen Adams Keller was born a healthy child in Tuscumbia, Alabama, on June 27, 1880. Her parents were Kate Adams Keller and Colonel Arthur Keller .

On her father's side she was descended from Colonel Alexander Spottswood, a colonial governor of Virginia, and on her mother's side, she was related to a number of prominent New England families. Helen's father, Arthur Keller, was a captain in the Confederate army. The family lost most of its wealth during the Civil War and lived modestly.

After the war, Captain Keller edited a local newspaper, the North Alabamian, and in 1885, under the Cleveland administration, he was appointed Marshal of North Alabama.

At the age of 19 months, Helen became deaf and blind as a result of an unknown illness, perhaps rubella or scarlet fever. As Helen grew from infancy into childhood, she became wild and unruly.

When Did Helen Keller Meet Anne Sullivan?

As she so often remarked as an adult, her life changed on March 3, 1887. On that day, Anne Mansfield Sullivan came to Tuscumbia to be her teacher.

Annie Sullivan, 1887

She was just 14 years older than her pupil Helen, and she too suffered from serious vision problems. Anne underwent many botched operations at a young age before her sight was partially restored.

Anne's success with Helen remains an extraordinary and remarkable story and is best known to people because of the film The Miracle Worker. The film correctly depicted Helen as an unruly, spoiled—but very bright—child who tyrannized the household with her temper tantrums.

Anne believed that the key to reaching Helen was to teach her obedience and love. She saw the need to discipline, but not crush, the spirit of her young charge. As a result, within a week of her arrival, she had gained permission to remove Helen from the main house and live alone with her in the nearby cottage. They remained there for two weeks.

Anne began her task of teaching Helen by manually signing into the child's hand. Anne had brought a doll that the children at Perkins had made for her to take to Helen. By spelling "d-o-l-l" into the child's hand, she hoped to teach her to connect objects with letters.

Helen quickly learned to form the letters correctly and in the correct order, but did not know she was spelling a word, or even that words existed. In the days that followed, she learned to spell a great many more words in this uncomprehending way.

What Were Helen Keller's First Words?

On April 5, 1887, less than a month after her arrival in Tuscumbia, Anne sought to resolve the confusion her pupil was having between the nouns "mug" and "milk," which Helen confused with the verb "drink."

Anne took Helen to the water pump outside and put Helen's hand under the spout. As the cool water gushed over one hand, she spelled into the other hand the word "w-a-t-e-r" first slowly, then rapidly. Suddenly, the signals had meaning in Helen's mind. She knew that "water" meant the wonderful cool substance flowing over her hand.

Quickly, she stopped and touched the earth and demanded its letter name and by nightfall she had learned 30 words.

Helen's early writing, which includes words like cold, catch, latch, load, lord, coal, doll, hat, bad, and good-by.

Helen quickly proceeded to master the alphabet, both manual and in raised print for blind readers, and gained facility in reading and writing. In Helen's handwriting, many round letters look square, but you can easily read everything.

In 1890, when she was just 10, she expressed a desire to learn to speak; Anne took Helen to see Sarah Fuller at the Horace Mann School for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Boston. Fuller gave Helen 11 lessons, after which Anne taught Helen.

Throughout her life, however, Helen remained dissatisfied with her spoken voice, which was hard to understand.

Helen's extraordinary abilities and her teacher's unique skills were noticed by Alexander Graham Bell and Mark Twain, two giants of American culture. Twain declared, "The two most interesting characters of the 19th century are Napoleon and Helen Keller."

The closeness of Helen and Anne's relationship led to accusations that Helen's ideas were not her own. Famously, at the age of 11, Helen was accused of plagiarism. Both Bell and Twain, who were friends and supporters of Helen and Anne, flew to the defense of both pupil and teacher and mocked their detractors. Read a letter from Mark Twain to Helen lamenting "that 'plagiarism' farce."

Helen Keller's Education and Literary Career

From a very young age, Helen was determined to go to college. In 1898, she entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies to prepare for Radcliffe College. She entered Radcliffe in the fall of 1900 and received a Bachelor of Arts degree cum laude in 1904, the first deafblind person to do so.

The achievement was as much Anne's as it was Helen's. Anne's eyes suffered immensely from reading everything that she then signed into her pupil's hand. Anne continued to labor by her pupil's side until her death in 1936, at which time Polly Thomson took over the task. Polly had joined Helen and Anne in 1914 as a secretary.

While still a student at Radcliffe, Helen began a writing career that was to continue throughout her life. In 1903, her autobiography, The Story of My Life , was published. This had appeared in serial form the previous year in Ladies' Home Journal magazine.

Her autobiography has been translated into 50 languages and remains in print to this day. Helen's other published works include Optimism , an essay; The World I Live In; The Song of the Stone Wall ; Out of the Dark; My Religion; Midstream—My Later Life; Peace at Eventide; Helen Keller in Scotland; Helen Keller's Journal; Let Us Have Faith; Teacher, Anne Sullivan Macy; and The Open Door . In addition, she was a frequent contributor to magazines and newspapers.

The Helen Keller Archives contain over 475 speeches and essays that she wrote on topics such as faith, blindness prevention, birth control, the rise of fascism in Europe, and atomic energy. Helen used a braille typewriter to prepare her manuscripts and then copied them on a regular typewriter.

Helen Keller's Political and Social Activism

Helen saw herself as a writer first—her passport listed her profession as "author." It was through the medium of the typewritten word that Helen communicated with Americans and ultimately with thousands across the globe.

From an early age, she championed the rights of the underdog and used her skills as a writer to speak truth to power. A pacifist, she protested U.S. involvement in World War I. A committed socialist, she took up the cause of workers' rights. She was also a tireless advocate for women's suffrage and an early member of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Helen's ideals found their purest, most lasting expression in her work for the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) . Helen joined AFB in 1924 and worked for the organization for over 40 years.

The foundation provided her with a global platform to advocate for the needs of people with vision loss and she wasted no opportunity. As a result of her travels across the United States, state commissions for the blind were created, rehabilitation centers were built, and education was made accessible to those with vision loss.

Helen Keller walking with a wounded soldier

Helen's optimism and courage were keenly felt at a personal level on many occasions, but perhaps never more so than during her visits to veteran's hospitals for soldiers returning from duty during World War II.

Helen was very proud of her assistance in the formation in 1946 of a special service for deaf-blind persons. Her message of faith and strength through adversity resonated with those returning from war injured and maimed.

Helen Keller was as interested in the welfare of blind persons in other countries as she was for those in her own country; conditions in poor and war-ravaged nations were of particular concern.

Helen's ability to empathize with the individual citizen in need as well as her ability to work with world leaders to shape global policy on vision loss made her a supremely effective ambassador for disabled persons worldwide. Her active participation in this area began as early as 1915, when the Permanent Blind War Relief Fund, later called the American Braille Press, was founded. She was a member of its first board of directors.

In 1946, when the American Braille Press became the American Foundation for Overseas Blind (now Helen Keller International), Helen was appointed counselor on international relations. It was then that she began her globe-circling tours on behalf of those with vision loss.

Helen Keller's Worldwide Celebrity

During seven trips between 1946 and 1957, she visited 35 countries on five continents. She met with world leaders such as Winston Churchill, Jawaharlal Nehru, and Golda Meir.

A group of schoolchildren in Kobe, Japan wave white flags with messages of welcome for Helen Keller and Polly Thomson, who are visiting in 1948

In 1948, she was sent to Japan as America's first Goodwill Ambassador by General Douglas MacArthur. Her visit was a huge success; up to two million Japanese came out to see her and her appearance drew considerable attention to the plight of Japan's blind and disabled population.

In 1955, when she was 75 years old, she embarked on one of her longest and most grueling journeys: a 40,000-mile, five-month-long tour through Asia.

Wherever she traveled, she brought encouragement to millions of blind people, and many of the efforts to improve conditions for those with vision loss outside the United States can be traced directly to her visits.

Helen was famous from the age of 8 until her death in 1968. Her wide range of political, cultural, and intellectual interests and activities ensured that she knew people in all spheres of life.

She counted leading personalities of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries among her friends and acquaintances. These included Eleanor Roosevelt, Will Rogers, Albert Einstein, Emma Goldman, Eugene Debs, Charlie Chaplin, John F. Kennedy, Andrew Carnegie, Henry Ford, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Katharine Cornell, and Jo Davidson to name but a few.

She was honored around the globe and garnered many awards. She received honorary doctoral degrees from Temple and Harvard Universities in the United States; Glasgow and Berlin Universities in Europe; Delhi University in India; and Witwatersrand University in South Africa. She also received an honorary Academy Award in 1955 as the inspiration for the documentary about her life, Helen Keller in Her Story.

Helen Keller's Later Life

Helen Keller, beaming, at 80 years old

Helen suffered a stroke in 1960, and from 1961 onwards, she lived quietly at Arcan Ridge, her home in Westport, Connecticut, one of the four main places she lived during her lifetime. (The others were Tuscumbia, Alabama; Wrentham, Massachusetts; and Forest Hills, New York).

She made her last major public appearance in 1961 at a Washington, D.C., Lions Clubs International Foundation meeting. At that meeting, she received the Lions Humanitarian Award for her lifetime of service to humanity and for providing the inspiration for the adoption by Lions Clubs International Foundation of their sight conservation and aid to blind programs.

During that visit to Washington, she also called on President John F. Kennedy at the White House. President Kennedy was just one in a long line of presidents Helen had met. In her lifetime, she had met all of the presidents since Grover Cleveland.

Helen Keller died on June 1, 1968, at Arcan Ridge, a few weeks short of her 88th birthday. Her ashes were placed next to her companions, Anne Sullivan Macy and Polly Thomson, in St. Joseph's Chapel of Washington Cathedral.

Senator Lister Hill of Alabama gave a eulogy during the public memorial service. He said, "She will live on, one of the few, the immortal names not born to die. Her spirit will endure as long as man can read and stories can be told of the woman who showed the world there are no boundaries to courage and faith."

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Helen Keller (DK Life Stories)

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DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

By libby romero read by penelope rawlins, category: children's nonfiction | audiobooks.

Apr 09, 2024 | 98 Minutes | 7-11 years | ISBN 9780593961452 --> Buy

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Libby Romero was a journalist and a teacher before becoming an author. Her books include the biography Ibn al-Haytham: The Man Who Discovered How We See, as well as teacher guides, interactive whiteboards, and a variety of other materials, including… More about Libby Romero

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Helen Keller

Helen Keller

(1880-1968)

Who Was Helen Keller?

Helen Keller was an American educator, advocate for the blind and deaf and co-founder of the ACLU. Stricken by an illness at the age of 2, Keller was left blind and deaf. Beginning in 1887, Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, helped her make tremendous progress with her ability to communicate, and Keller went on to college, graduating in 1904. During her lifetime, she received many honors in recognition of her accomplishments.

Early Life and Family

The family was not particularly wealthy and earned income from their cotton plantation. Later, Arthur became the editor of a weekly local newspaper, the North Alabamian .

Keller was born with her senses of sight and hearing, and started speaking when she was just 6 months old. She started walking at the age of 1.

Loss of Sight and Hearing

Keller lost both her sight and hearing at just 19 months old. In 1882, she contracted an illness — called "brain fever" by the family doctor — that produced a high body temperature. The true nature of the illness remains a mystery today, though some experts believe it might have been scarlet fever or meningitis.

Within a few days after the fever broke, Keller's mother noticed that her daughter didn't show any reaction when the dinner bell was rung, or when a hand was waved in front of her face.

As Keller grew into childhood, she developed a limited method of communication with her companion, Martha Washington, the young daughter of the family cook. The two had created a type of sign language. By the time Keller was 7, they had invented more than 60 signs to communicate with each other.

During this time, Keller had also become very wild and unruly. She would kick and scream when angry, and giggle uncontrollably when happy. She tormented Martha and inflicted raging tantrums on her parents. Many family relatives felt she should be institutionalized.

Keller's Teacher, Anne Sullivan

Keller worked with her teacher Anne Sullivan for 49 years, from 1887 until Sullivan's death in 1936. In 1932, Sullivan experienced health problems and lost her eyesight completely. A young woman named Polly Thomson, who had begun working as a secretary for Keller and Sullivan in 1914, became Keller's constant companion upon Sullivan's death.

Looking for answers and inspiration, Keller's mother came across a travelogue by Charles Dickens, American Notes, in 1886. She read of the successful education of another deaf and blind child, Laura Bridgman, and soon dispatched Keller and her father to Baltimore, Maryland to see specialist Dr. J. Julian Chisolm.

After examining Keller, Chisolm recommended that she see Alexander Graham Bell , the inventor of the telephone, who was working with deaf children at the time. Bell met with Keller and her parents, and suggested that they travel to the Perkins Institute for the Blind in Boston, Massachusetts.

Helen Keller with Anne Sullivan in July 1888

There, the family met with the school's director, Michael Anaganos. He suggested Keller work with one of the institute's most recent graduates, Sullivan.

On March 3, 1887, Sullivan went to Keller's home in Alabama and immediately went to work. She began by teaching six-year-old Keller finger spelling, starting with the word "doll," to help Keller understand the gift of a doll she had brought along. Other words would follow.

At first, Keller was curious, then defiant, refusing to cooperate with Sullivan's instruction. When Keller did cooperate, Sullivan could tell that she wasn't making the connection between the objects and the letters spelled out in her hand. Sullivan kept working at it, forcing Keller to go through the regimen.

As Keller's frustration grew, the tantrums increased. Finally, Sullivan demanded that she and Keller be isolated from the rest of the family for a time, so that Keller could concentrate only on Sullivan's instruction. They moved to a cottage on the plantation.

In a dramatic struggle, Sullivan taught Keller the word "water"; she helped her make the connection between the object and the letters by taking Keller out to the water pump, and placing Keller's hand under the spout. While Sullivan moved the lever to flush cool water over Keller's hand, she spelled out the word w-a-t-e-r on Keller's other hand. Keller understood and repeated the word in Sullivan's hand. She then pounded the ground, demanding to know its "letter name." Sullivan followed her, spelling out the word into her hand. Keller moved to other objects with Sullivan in tow. By nightfall, she had learned 30 words.

In 1905, Sullivan married John Macy, an instructor at Harvard University, a social critic and a prominent socialist. After the marriage, Sullivan continued to be Keller's guide and mentor. When Keller went to live with the Macys, they both initially gave Keller their undivided attention. Gradually, however, Anne and John became distant to each other, as Anne's devotion to Keller continued unabated. After several years, the couple separated, though were never divorced.

In 1890, Keller began speech classes at the Horace Mann School for the Deaf in Boston. She would toil for 25 years to learn to speak so that others could understand her.

From 1894 to 1896, Keller attended the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf in New York City. There, she worked on improving her communication skills and studied regular academic subjects.

Around this time, Keller became determined to attend college. In 1896, she attended the Cambridge School for Young Ladies, a preparatory school for women.

As her story became known to the general public, Keller began to meet famous and influential people. One of them was the writer Mark Twain , who was very impressed with her. They became friends. Twain introduced her to his friend Henry H. Rogers, a Standard Oil executive.

Rogers was so impressed with Keller's talent, drive and determination that he agreed to pay for her to attend Radcliffe College. There, she was accompanied by Sullivan, who sat by her side to interpret lectures and texts. By this time, Keller had mastered several methods of communication, including touch-lip reading, Braille, speech, typing and finger-spelling.

Keller graduated, cum laude, from Radcliffe College in 1904, at the age of 24.

DOWNLOAD BIOGRAPHY'S HELEN KELLER FACT CARD

Helen Keller Fact Card

'The Story of My Life'

With the help of Sullivan and Macy, Sullivan's future husband, Keller wrote her first book, The Story of My Life . Published in 1905, the memoirs covered Keller's transformation from childhood to 21-year-old college student.

Social Activism

Throughout the first half of the 20th century, Keller tackled social and political issues, including women's suffrage, pacifism, birth control and socialism.

After college, Keller set out to learn more about the world and how she could help improve the lives of others. News of her story spread beyond Massachusetts and New England. Keller became a well-known celebrity and lecturer by sharing her experiences with audiences, and working on behalf of others living with disabilities. She testified before Congress, strongly advocating to improve the welfare of blind people.

In 1915, along with renowned city planner George Kessler, she co-founded Helen Keller International to combat the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition. In 1920, she helped found the American Civil Liberties Union .

When the American Federation for the Blind was established in 1921, Keller had an effective national outlet for her efforts. She became a member in 1924, and participated in many campaigns to raise awareness, money and support for the blind. She also joined other organizations dedicated to helping those less fortunate, including the Permanent Blind War Relief Fund (later called the American Braille Press).

Soon after she graduated from college, Keller became a member of the Socialist Party, most likely due in part to her friendship with John Macy. Between 1909 and 1921, she wrote several articles about socialism and supported Eugene Debs, a Socialist Party presidential candidate. Her series of essays on socialism, entitled "Out of the Dark," described her views on socialism and world affairs.

It was during this time that Keller first experienced public prejudice about her disabilities. For most of her life, the press had been overwhelmingly supportive of her, praising her courage and intelligence. But after she expressed her socialist views, some criticized her by calling attention to her disabilities. One newspaper, the Brooklyn Eagle , wrote that her "mistakes sprung out of the manifest limitations of her development."

In 1946, Keller was appointed counselor of international relations for the American Foundation of Overseas Blind. Between 1946 and 1957, she traveled to 35 countries on five continents.

In 1955, at age 75, Keller embarked on the longest and most grueling trip of her life: a 40,000-mile, five-month trek across Asia. Through her many speeches and appearances, she brought inspiration and encouragement to millions of people.

'The Miracle Worker' Movie

Keller's autobiography, The Story of My Life , was used as the basis for 1957 television drama The Miracle Worker .

In 1959, the story was developed into a Broadway play of the same title, starring Patty Duke as Keller and Anne Bancroft as Sullivan. The two actresses also performed those roles in the 1962 award-winning film version of the play.

Awards and Honors

During her lifetime, she received many honors in recognition of her accomplishments, including the Theodore Roosevelt Distinguished Service Medal in 1936, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964, and election to the Women's Hall of Fame in 1965.

Keller also received honorary doctoral degrees from Temple University and Harvard University and from the universities of Glasgow, Scotland; Berlin, Germany; Delhi, India; and Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. She was named an Honorary Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotland.

Keller died in her sleep on June 1, 1968, just a few weeks before her 88th birthday. Keller suffered a series of strokes in 1961 and spent the remaining years of her life at her home in Connecticut.

During her remarkable life, Keller stood as a powerful example of how determination, hard work, and imagination can allow an individual to triumph over adversity. By overcoming difficult conditions with a great deal of persistence, she grew into a respected and world-renowned activist who labored for the betterment of others.

QUICK FACTS

  • Name: Helen Adams Keller
  • Birth Year: 1880
  • Birth date: June 27, 1880
  • Birth State: Alabama
  • Birth City: Tuscumbia
  • Birth Country: United States
  • Gender: Female
  • Best Known For: American educator Helen Keller overcame the adversity of being blind and deaf to become one of the 20th century's leading humanitarians, as well as co-founder of the ACLU.
  • Education and Academia
  • Astrological Sign: Cancer
  • Wright-Humason School for the Deaf
  • Radcliffe College
  • Cambridge School for Young Ladies
  • Horace Mann School for the Deaf
  • Death Year: 1968
  • Death date: June 1, 1968
  • Death State: Connecticut
  • Death City: Easton
  • Death Country: United States

We strive for accuracy and fairness.If you see something that doesn't look right, contact us !

CITATION INFORMATION

  • Article Title: Helen Keller Biography
  • Author: Biography.com Editors
  • Website Name: The Biography.com website
  • Url: https://www.biography.com/activists/helen-keller
  • Access Date:
  • Publisher: A&E; Television Networks
  • Last Updated: May 6, 2021
  • Original Published Date: April 3, 2014
  • Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see the shadow.
  • One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.
  • Remember, no effort that we make to attain something beautiful is ever lost. Sometime, somewhere, somehow we shall find that which we seek.
  • Gradually from naming an object we advance step by step until we have traversed the vast distance between our first stammered syllable and the sweep of thought in a line of Shakespeare.
  • If it is true that the violin is the most perfect of musical instruments, then Greek is the violin of human thought.
  • A happy life consists not in the absence, but in the mastery of hardships.
  • The two greatest characters in the 19th century are Napoleon and Helen Keller. Napoleon tried to conquer the world by physical force and failed. Helen tried to conquer the world by power of mind — and succeeded!” (Mark Twain)
  • The bulk of the world’s knowledge is an imaginary construction.
  • We differ, blind and seeing, one from another, not in our senses, but in the use we make of them, in the imagination and courage with which we seek wisdom beyond the senses.
  • [T]he mystery of language was revealed to me. I knew then that "w-a-t-e-r" meant the wonderful cool something that was flowing over my hand. That living word awakened my soul, gave it light, hope, joy, set it free!
  • It is more difficult to teach ignorance to think than to teach an intelligent blind man to see the grandeur of Niagara.
  • Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content.

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helen keller dk biography

45 Helen Keller Quotes on Life, Faith and Happiness

H elen Keller was a famous lecturer, author, activist and educator who advocated for underprivileged individuals, such as women, people with disabilities and African Americans. So, it's no wonder that  Helen Keller’s quotes are often profound and optimistic , ranging from topics like education and nature to love and dogs.

Keller was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama in 1880, and she became deaf and blind at 19 months old due to an illness. Keller’s mother sought medical advice for Helen’s condition and was eventually referred to Alexander Graham Bell because, at the time, he worked with deaf children. Graham recommended that the Keller family visit the Perkins Institute for the Blind in Boston, Massachusetts.

It was at Perkins where Keller met Anne Sullivan, the tutor she would work with for 49 years. Sullivan was partially blind, but she taught Keller how to spell by signing the alphabet in her hand until Keller learned all the letters. One of their most notable experiences was when Sullivan spelled “w-a-t-e-r” in one of Keller’s hands, while her other hand felt the cool water from a water spout. Keller went on to complete formal speech classes and learn braille and the art of manual lip-reading.

With assistance from Sullivan, Keller graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College in 1904. She even published her autobiography, The Story of My Life , in 1903. While she may be known for her loss of sight and incredible life, Keller was passionate about raising awareness for causes such as women’s suffrage and the labor movement. In 1924, The American Federation for the Blind designated Keller as their official spokeswoman.

Here are 45 Helen Keller quotes that reflect her varied life experiences and passions.

Related:  45 Carl Jung Quotes on Life, Wisdom and Perspective

45 Helen Keller Quotes

1. "The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched—they must be felt with the heart."

2. "Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence."

3. “Long before I learned to do a sum in arithmetic or describe the shape of the earth, Miss [Anne] Sullivan had taught me to find beauty in the fragrant woods, in every blade of grass, and in the curves and dimples of my baby sister’s hand.”

4. "Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved."

5. "Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much."

6. "Nobody, who is not blind, as much as they may love their pet, can know what a dog’s love really means. Dogs have traveled all over the world with me. They have always been my companions. A dog has never failed me."

7. "The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision."

8. "Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see a shadow."

9. "What we have once enjoyed we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes a part of us."

10. "Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all."

11. "The highest result of education is tolerance."

12. "What a blind person needs is not a teacher but another self."

13. "I knew then that “w-a-t-e-r” meant the wonderful cool something that was flowing over my hand. That living word awakened my soul, gave it light, hope, joy, set it free!"

14. "We could never learn to be brave and patient if there were only joy in the world."

15. "I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble."

Related:  55 Socrates Quotes on Philosophy, Education and Life

16. "What I'm looking for is not out there, it is in me."

17. "The marvelous richness of human experience would lose something of rewarding joy if there were no limitations to overcome."

18. "We can do anything we want to do if we stick to it long enough."

19. "True happiness... is not attained through self-gratification, but through fidelity to a worthy purpose."

20. "No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land, or opened a new heaven to the human spirit."

21. "Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light."

22. "When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us."

23. "Face your deficiencies and acknowledge them; but do not let them master you. Let them teach you patience, sweetness, insight."

24. "The struggle of life is one of our greatest blessings. It makes us patient, sensitive, and Godlike. It teaches us that although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it."

25. "Education should train the child to use his brains, to make for himself a place in the world and maintain his rights even when it seems that society would shove him into the scrap-heap."

26. "Life is an exciting business, and most exciting when it is lived for others."

27. "So long as the memory of certain beloved friends lives in my heart, I shall say that life is good."

28. "Each day comes to me with both hands full of possibilities."

29. "If I write what my soul thinks it will be visible, and the words will be its body."

Related:  75 Stoic Quotes from Philosophers of Stoicism About Life, Happiness and Wisdom

30. "Do not think of today’s failures, but of the success that may come tomorrow."

31. "Many persons have a wrong idea of what constitutes true happiness. It is not attained through self-gratification but through fidelity to a worthy purpose."

32. "The world is moved along, not only by the mighty shoves of its heroes, but also by the aggregate of tiny pushes of each honest worker."

33. "Faith is the strength by which a shattered world shall emerge into the light."

34. "Self-pity is our worst enemy and if we yield to it, we can never do anything wise in this world."

35. "We can do anything we want to if we stick to it long enough."

36. "I thank God for my handicaps. For through them, I have found myself, my work, and my God."

37. "Joy is the holy fire that keeps our purpose warm and our intelligence aglow."

Related:  50 Aristotle Quotes on Philosophy, Virtue and Education

38. "A bend in the road is not the end of the road…Unless you fail to make the turn."

39. "The world is full of suffering, but it is also full of the overcoming of it."

40. "No one has the right to consume happiness without producing it."

41. "I believe that God is in me as the sun is in the colour and fragrance of a flower – the Light in my darkness, the Voice in my silence."

42. "Every child has a right to be well-born, well-nurtured and well-taught, and only the freedom of woman can guarantee him this right."

43. "We are never really happy until we try to brighten the lives of others."

44. "Four things to learn in life: To think clearly without hurry or confusion; To love everybody sincerely; To act in everything with the highest motives; To trust God unhesitatingly."

45. "Love is like a beautiful flower which I may not touch, but whose fragrance makes the garden a place of delight just the same."

Next:  From 'Narnia' to Wormwood to 'The Four Loves'—Here Are 125 of the Best C.S. Lewis Quotes

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IMAGES

  1. DK Biography: Helen Keller

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  2. Helen Keller (DK Biography)

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  3. Helen Keller (DK Biography)

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  4. DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

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  5. Helen Keller: A photographic story of a life (DK Biography) by Leslie

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VIDEO

  1. The Anne Sullivan Macy Act

  2. Defeating Darkness: Inspiring Stories of Overcoming Adversity

  3. 😍Biography of Helen Keller😍

  4. Who Was Helen Keller's Biggest Supporter?

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  6. Helen Keller: Triumph Over Adversity

COMMENTS

  1. DK Biography: Helen Keller

    About DK Biography: Helen Keller. Tells the inspirational tale of the spirited crusader, Helen Keller. In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today. Full-color photographs of people, places, and artifacts ...

  2. Helen Keller: A photographic story of a life (DK Biography)

    Tells the inspirational tale of the spirited crusader, Helen Keller. In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today.

  3. DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

    About DK Life Stories: Helen Keller. In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world. Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing due to an early childhood illness and spent the first 6 years of her life unable to interact with other people.

  4. DK Biography: Helen Keller: A Photographic Story of a Life

    Tells the inspirational tale of the spirited crusader, Helen Keller. In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today. Full-color photographs of people, places, and artifacts, definitions of key words, and sidebars on related subjects add dimension and relevance ...

  5. DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

    DK Life Stories: Helen Keller. In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world. Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing due to an early childhood illness and spent the first 6 years of her life unable to interact with other people.

  6. Helen Keller (DK Biography)

    Tells the inspirational tale of the spirited crusader, Helen Keller. In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today. Full-color photographs of people, places, and artifacts, definitions of key words, and sidebars on related subjects add dimension and relevance ...

  7. DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

    DK Life Stories: Helen Keller. Paperback - Illustrated, January 8, 2019. by Libby Romero (Author), Charlotte Ager (Illustrator) 4.6 58 ratings. See all formats and editions. In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world.

  8. Helen Keller (DK Biography) by Lesley Garrett

    Helen Keller by Leslie Garrett talks about Helen Keller's life in the third omniscient perspective. Before starting to talk about her life,I want to illustrate that this is my second time reading about Helen Keller's life. ... It's a 128-page DK Biography book. This is a great book for anyone familiar or not with HK. Her story is truly amazing ...

  9. Helen Keller

    In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world. Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing due to an early childhood illness and spent the first 6 years of her life unable to interact with other people. She remained isolated from the outside world until Anne Sullivan came to work as her teacher.

  10. DK Life Stories Helen Keller

    About DK Life Stories Helen Keller In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world. Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing due to an early childhood illness and spent the first 6 years of her life unable to interact with other people.

  11. DK Biography: Helen Keller

    About DK Biography: Helen Keller. Tells the inspirational tale of the spirited crusader, Helen Keller. In this groundbreaking new series, DK brings together fresh voices and DK design values to give readers the most information-packed, visually exciting biographies on the market today. Full-color photographs of people, places, and artifacts ...

  12. Helen Keller

    Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 - June 1, 1968) was an American author, disability rights advocate, political activist and lecturer. Born in West Tuscumbia, Alabama, she lost her sight and her hearing after a bout of illness when she was 19 months old. She then communicated primarily using home signs until the age of seven, when she met her first teacher and life-long companion Anne Sullivan.

  13. Helen Keller Biography

    Portrait of Helen Keller as a young girl, with a white dog on her lap (August 1887) Helen Adams Keller was born a healthy child in Tuscumbia, Alabama, on June 27, 1880. Her parents were Kate Adams Keller and Colonel Arthur Keller. On her father's side she was descended from Colonel Alexander Spottswood, a colonial governor of Virginia, and on ...

  14. Helen Keller (DK Life Stories)

    Helen Keller (DK Life Stories) In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world. Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing due to an early childhood illness and spent the first six years of her life unable to interact with other people.

  15. About DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

    About DK Life Stories: Helen Keller. In this kids' biography, discover the inspiring story of Helen Keller, who overcame the odds by learning to understand and communicate with the world. Helen Keller lost her sight and hearing due to an early childhood illness and spent the first 6 years of her life unable to interact with other people. She ...

  16. Helen Keller (DK Life Stories) by Libby Romero

    845 reviews 512 followers. May 21, 2024. This DK Life Stories series is for middle grade, and brings inspiring story of Helen Keller who was the first blind and deaf person to graduate from college. Helen was born on June 27, 1880 in Tuscumbia, Alabama. She was eighteen months when she got sick and lost her sight and hearing.

  17. Helen Keller

    Stricken by an illness at the age of 2, Keller was left blind and deaf. Beginning in 1887, Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, helped her make tremendous progress with her ability to communicate, and ...

  18. Helen Keller (DK Biography (Paperback)): Garrett, Leslie: 9781613835241

    So I started reading Helen, as many people who have these dogs name them Helen or Keller. I was astounded, dumbfounded, beyond moved, by her JOY OF LIFE! My biggest fear was that I was not understanding the dark and silent world my dogs inhabit, and having delved vicariously into their thoughts, I understand they do have silly joy, amazing ...

  19. DK Life Stories: Helen Keller

    In this biography for kids ages 8-12, learn all about Helen Keller's amazing life and achievements--how she learned to read Braille and speak, go to college, write books, and ultimately revolutionize the world through her activism on behalf of the deaf and blind.

  20. 45 Helen Keller Quotes on Life, Faith and Happiness

    Keller was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama in 1880, and she became deaf and blind at 19 months old due to an illness. Keller's mother sought medical advice for Helen's condition and was eventually ...

  21. Helen Keller (DK Biography)

    Helen Keller (DK Biography) Hardcover - August 23, 2004 by Leslie Garrett (Author), Annie Tremmel Wilcox (Author) 4.8 4.8 out of 5 stars 88 ratings