9 Creative Problem Solving Tools For Your Next Breakthrough Idea

This is a suite of 9 creative problem solving tools from Erik op ten Berg. He’s an expert in creative thinking or applying creativity from the Netherlands.

He’s been working in this field for 25 years and has a Master of Science from Buffalo State University in New York.

His creative problem solving process takes a challenge and finds ideas that are new, useful and meaningful. I guarantee you this process will help you mobilise your group’s creative thinking skills.

You and your group will find original ideas which are always there. This helps you get to the holy grail of breakthrough thinking and quite possibly the ‘next big thing’.

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Interview with Erik op ten Berg

Watch this video to see Erik describe in detail how each tool / activity works with examples.

Please note that the video and audio quality is a little shaky in places. Sorry about that! We had some technical issues with Skype that were difficult to overcome.

Four Stages of Creative Problem Solving

The first two stages help you and your group ‘explore ideas’. The third stage helps you select the best ideas and the fourth tests the feasibility of your best ideas.

These are the four stages you need to go through (no skipping a stage please):

  • Idea generation
  • Idea expansion
  • Idea selection
  • Idea feasibility

Always start with the ABC Avalanche and then use 1 or 2 of the next 5 tools to expand the list of possible solutions.

1. ABC Avalanche (3:55sec on video)

A very basic brainstorming technique but extremely powerful.

This tool asks people to generate at least 26 ideas for a specific challenge sorting them by their first letters. It takes about 10-15 minutes.

  • Write down the central question.
  • Write down the letters of the alphabet.
  • Generate many ideas sorting them by their first letters.
  • Complete the alphabet.

Because participants focus on generating a specific number of ideas they postpone their judgments.

These attitudes are core to creative problem solving:

  • Generating many alternative ideas.
  • Postponing judgments.
  • Moving past the first few (obvious) ideas.

Depending on the number of people in the session you can split into sub-groups. Feel free to build in a little competition between the groups if you like.

From this stage you have at least 26 starting ideas and people won’t have jumped into judging whether they are good ideas or not.

2. Breaking Assumptions (7:38min on video)

This is a second stage to an ABC Avalanche.

One of the very classical thinking techniques because to be truly creative you need to break patterns.

Once you’re aware of a pattern or an assumption in your idea generation so far you can deliberately break this assumption and new ideas will come forward and present themselves.

  • List 5 assumptions present in the question or in the list of ideas.
  • Take the opposite of each assumption.
  • Imagine new solutions that run opposite to the initial assumptions.
  • Add these to your list of ideas.

You ask the group to identify any patterns or assumptions that are built into either the challenge or list of ideas they’ve generated so far.

Then you ask them to take the opposite view (i.e. break that assumption) and come up with any new solutions and add them to your list of ideas.

3. Association Flower (11:13min on video)

Also a second stage technique after ABC Avalanche giving you and your group extra ‘access points’ from which to consider the challenge and generate more ideas.

This technique will generate a long list of associated keywords that can be used to generate even more ideas related to the original challenge.

  • Write down a keyword about the challenge in the centre of the flower and four words that are associated with the keyword around it (see template on next page).
  • Write around this keyword four associations.
  • Then follow each of the 4 words in turn up its branch writing associated keywords as you go.
  • Then use all these words to think in a new way about your challenge and generate even more ideas.
  • Make the list of ideas as large as possible.

4. Visual Connections (15:33min on video)

Another way to create new ‘access points’ from which to generate new ideas.

  • Focus on an interesting object, picture or an article in a newspaper.
  • Write down your thoughts, reactions, impressions and observations.
  • Make connections to the central topic and write these down as new ideas.
  • Repeat this several times and expand your list of ideas.

You could bring a deck of pictures with you, or a set of magazines, or even ask the participants to bring their own magazines so they’re an integral part of the process.

5. SCAMPER (18:31min on video)

Use the 8 words from the acronym to approach the challenge from a different angle and generate a larger list of creative ideas.

SCAMPER is the summary of 72 questions used by Alex Osborn who is the man that founded the concept of brainstorming in the early 40s.

  • SUBSTITUTE: parts, the whole, material…
  • COMBINE: functions, material, just different…
  • ADAPT: other color, place, use, form, timing…
  • MAXIMIZE: bigger, stronger, longer, more time, macro level, use more often…
  • MINIMIZE: smaller, lighter, shorter, micro level, less important…
  • PUT TO OTHER USES: other context…
  • ELIMINATE: parts, functions, material…
  • REVERSE: sequence, upside down, inside out…

There’s no need to do all these words. Let them go wherever they want to go to create more productive access points to tackle the original challenge.

6. Analogy with nature (22:32min on video)

Sometimes people are using this technique as biomimicry .

Your question to the group: what kind of animals are you thinking about when you use your imagination?

Get them to list lots of animals quickly and ask them to select one. What is it that makes this an extraordinary animal?

Once you have that list of characteristics about the animal use those words as access points to generate more ideas about the challenge. What you’re doing here is using the beauty of nature and bringing that connection back to the challenge.

  • List several names of animals.
  • Choose a special animal with no link to the problem.
  • List 10 characteristics about this animal.
  • Use each characteristic as a stimulus for new ideas.
  • Make a force-to-fit to the problem and boost your list of ideas.

Next step is to select ideas through a process of prioritization that you want to go deeper into and do further work on to develop them further.

7. Selecting ideas & COCD Box (24:37min on video)

Using a combination of dots (or hits as Erik calls them) and his COCD box you’re looking to boil down your grand list of ideas down to about 15 really good ones (5 in each color – blue, red and yellow).

  • 5-15 IDEAS: everybody selects his or her 1-3 favorite hits; make out of these a top 3.
  • 15-40 IDEAS: 5 sparkling ideas per person; focus on these and define an overall top 5 using dots or hits.
  • >40 IDEAS: select individually 5-8 blue-red-yellow ideas (COCD-box); define the BIG 5 in each color.

Once you have 5 good ideas in each of the coloured boxes look for themes across them to try and boil everything down to a Top 5 by making some smart combinations.

If you’re looking for breakthrough ideas (and most often you will be) the ideas in the red box will be the ones you want to focus on in the next stage.

8. Concepting (30:07min on video)

What you’re looking to do now is enrich your ideas into concepts. You do this by combining your headline ideas with other ideas that are closely related from your overall list.

Take each red idea in turn and see if you can bundle in other ideas from the grand list.

  • Focus on the selected ideas.
  • Take one idea and add on different ideas (with and without dots) from the idea list, to enrich the original idea.
  • Do this for all the selected ideas.
  • Give the enriched ideas an attractive title.
  • Go on with these results.

Then give the enriched ideas a more attractive title.

9. PPCO (33:38min on video)

This is one of Erik’s little gems he got out of his Master of Science in Buffalo.

At this stage you’re looking to expand and test your best ideas or concepts for feasibility.

  • Pluses : what is good, positive about the idea.
  • Potentials : what are the possibilities if the idea were pursued.
  • Concerns : phrase shortcomings or limitations of the idea as questions.
  • Overcomes : generate ideas to overcome the ‘burning’ concerns.

PPCO is like a SWOT analysis but in a more positive end. A moving towards approach instead of getting away approach. Facing truth and reality in a way of opportunities.

Pluses : Let’s see why we should do this idea. Potentials : What are the extra potentials of this idea that you haven’t considered before? These are extra or super pluses. Concerns : ‘how can I overcome (insert negative point here) …” Overcomes : your last stage of creative thinking where you’re generating answers of how to overcome your concerns.

You end with a triple positive state with very realistic backgrounds. That’s the kind of creativity you need when you have a good idea and you want to move it further whilst trying to taste a bit of the potential of it.

Creative problem solving is a process that, if you have the right tools and activities at hand, you can consistently achieve fantastic results from.

For your session to be a success you need to make sure you move past the first few obvious ideas, you generate tonnes of alternatives and that you postpone judgment on the quality of each idea until the appropriate moment.

How does your experience stack up? Do you have any secrets you’d like to share in the comments below?

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About the Author

Erik op ten Berg (1963) holds a Master of Science Degree in Creativity and Change Leadership, and is educated in Innovation Management at Delft Technical University in The Netherlands. He is a well-known trainer in Creative Problem Solving, and moderator of hundreds of change focused brainstorm workshops. Besides his own company Pioen consult he is also partner at the “Center for the Development of Creative Thinking” (COCD) in Belgium.

Thanks great would like to communicate with Erik Op Ten Berg

dear Rakesh! send me an email at [email protected] ; I will appologize for the delays in my answer because of some Summer holiday trips until August 22…

Thanks for sharing all these ideas. Very interesting and it generates a lots of ideas. One of them is the potential use of istock or getty image platform to search visuals using key words for Visual connections exercises. Wonder if you have try something like this in the past.

Great idea Dany. You need to be careful of potential copyright infringements obviously but there are loads of free stock image repositories out there too you can use in the way you suggest.

hi Dany! visual connections are an “easy way” to create access to thoughts that didn’t came up before; you can do this offline and also online; my experience with group thinking is better with offline pictures then online; bur for individual practice the online inspiration can be very productive and provocative; I wish you lots of creative detours in your own thinking; best wishes, Erik op ten Berg

Very educative, very informative, very useful for a trainer/coach. Thanks for great help to trainer community. World owes you a lot.

excellent approach

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Article • 10 min read

Creative Problem Solving

Finding innovative solutions to challenges.

By the Mind Tools Content Team

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

Imagine that you're vacuuming your house in a hurry because you've got friends coming over. Frustratingly, you're working hard but you're not getting very far. You kneel down, open up the vacuum cleaner, and pull out the bag. In a cloud of dust, you realize that it's full... again. Coughing, you empty it and wonder why vacuum cleaners with bags still exist!

James Dyson, inventor and founder of Dyson® vacuum cleaners, had exactly the same problem, and he used creative problem solving to find the answer. While many companies focused on developing a better vacuum cleaner filter, he realized that he had to think differently and find a more creative solution. So, he devised a revolutionary way to separate the dirt from the air, and invented the world's first bagless vacuum cleaner. [1]

Creative problem solving (CPS) is a way of solving problems or identifying opportunities when conventional thinking has failed. It encourages you to find fresh perspectives and come up with innovative solutions, so that you can formulate a plan to overcome obstacles and reach your goals.

In this article, we'll explore what CPS is, and we'll look at its key principles. We'll also provide a model that you can use to generate creative solutions.

About Creative Problem Solving

Alex Osborn, founder of the Creative Education Foundation, first developed creative problem solving in the 1940s, along with the term "brainstorming." And, together with Sid Parnes, he developed the Osborn-Parnes Creative Problem Solving Process. Despite its age, this model remains a valuable approach to problem solving. [2]

The early Osborn-Parnes model inspired a number of other tools. One of these is the 2011 CPS Learner's Model, also from the Creative Education Foundation, developed by Dr Gerard J. Puccio, Marie Mance, and co-workers. In this article, we'll use this modern four-step model to explore how you can use CPS to generate innovative, effective solutions.

Why Use Creative Problem Solving?

Dealing with obstacles and challenges is a regular part of working life, and overcoming them isn't always easy. To improve your products, services, communications, and interpersonal skills, and for you and your organization to excel, you need to encourage creative thinking and find innovative solutions that work.

CPS asks you to separate your "divergent" and "convergent" thinking as a way to do this. Divergent thinking is the process of generating lots of potential solutions and possibilities, otherwise known as brainstorming. And convergent thinking involves evaluating those options and choosing the most promising one. Often, we use a combination of the two to develop new ideas or solutions. However, using them simultaneously can result in unbalanced or biased decisions, and can stifle idea generation.

For more on divergent and convergent thinking, and for a useful diagram, see the book "Facilitator's Guide to Participatory Decision-Making." [3]

Core Principles of Creative Problem Solving

CPS has four core principles. Let's explore each one in more detail:

  • Divergent and convergent thinking must be balanced. The key to creativity is learning how to identify and balance divergent and convergent thinking (done separately), and knowing when to practice each one.
  • Ask problems as questions. When you rephrase problems and challenges as open-ended questions with multiple possibilities, it's easier to come up with solutions. Asking these types of questions generates lots of rich information, while asking closed questions tends to elicit short answers, such as confirmations or disagreements. Problem statements tend to generate limited responses, or none at all.
  • Defer or suspend judgment. As Alex Osborn learned from his work on brainstorming, judging solutions early on tends to shut down idea generation. Instead, there's an appropriate and necessary time to judge ideas during the convergence stage.
  • Focus on "Yes, and," rather than "No, but." Language matters when you're generating information and ideas. "Yes, and" encourages people to expand their thoughts, which is necessary during certain stages of CPS. Using the word "but" – preceded by "yes" or "no" – ends conversation, and often negates what's come before it.

How to Use the Tool

Let's explore how you can use each of the four steps of the CPS Learner's Model (shown in figure 1, below) to generate innovative ideas and solutions.

Figure 1 – CPS Learner's Model

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

Explore the Vision

Identify your goal, desire or challenge. This is a crucial first step because it's easy to assume, incorrectly, that you know what the problem is. However, you may have missed something or have failed to understand the issue fully, and defining your objective can provide clarity. Read our article, 5 Whys , for more on getting to the root of a problem quickly.

Gather Data

Once you've identified and understood the problem, you can collect information about it and develop a clear understanding of it. Make a note of details such as who and what is involved, all the relevant facts, and everyone's feelings and opinions.

Formulate Questions

When you've increased your awareness of the challenge or problem you've identified, ask questions that will generate solutions. Think about the obstacles you might face and the opportunities they could present.

Explore Ideas

Generate ideas that answer the challenge questions you identified in step 1. It can be tempting to consider solutions that you've tried before, as our minds tend to return to habitual thinking patterns that stop us from producing new ideas. However, this is a chance to use your creativity .

Brainstorming and Mind Maps are great ways to explore ideas during this divergent stage of CPS. And our articles, Encouraging Team Creativity , Problem Solving , Rolestorming , Hurson's Productive Thinking Model , and The Four-Step Innovation Process , can also help boost your creativity.

See our Brainstorming resources within our Creativity section for more on this.

Formulate Solutions

This is the convergent stage of CPS, where you begin to focus on evaluating all of your possible options and come up with solutions. Analyze whether potential solutions meet your needs and criteria, and decide whether you can implement them successfully. Next, consider how you can strengthen them and determine which ones are the best "fit." Our articles, Critical Thinking and ORAPAPA , are useful here.

4. Implement

Formulate a plan.

Once you've chosen the best solution, it's time to develop a plan of action. Start by identifying resources and actions that will allow you to implement your chosen solution. Next, communicate your plan and make sure that everyone involved understands and accepts it.

There have been many adaptations of CPS since its inception, because nobody owns the idea.

For example, Scott Isaksen and Donald Treffinger formed The Creative Problem Solving Group Inc . and the Center for Creative Learning , and their model has evolved over many versions. Blair Miller, Jonathan Vehar and Roger L. Firestien also created their own version, and Dr Gerard J. Puccio, Mary C. Murdock, and Marie Mance developed CPS: The Thinking Skills Model. [4] Tim Hurson created The Productive Thinking Model , and Paul Reali developed CPS: Competencies Model. [5]

Sid Parnes continued to adapt the CPS model by adding concepts such as imagery and visualization , and he founded the Creative Studies Project to teach CPS. For more information on the evolution and development of the CPS process, see Creative Problem Solving Version 6.1 by Donald J. Treffinger, Scott G. Isaksen, and K. Brian Dorval. [6]

Creative Problem Solving (CPS) Infographic

See our infographic on Creative Problem Solving .

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

Creative problem solving (CPS) is a way of using your creativity to develop new ideas and solutions to problems. The process is based on separating divergent and convergent thinking styles, so that you can focus your mind on creating at the first stage, and then evaluating at the second stage.

There have been many adaptations of the original Osborn-Parnes model, but they all involve a clear structure of identifying the problem, generating new ideas, evaluating the options, and then formulating a plan for successful implementation.

[1] Entrepreneur (2012). James Dyson on Using Failure to Drive Success [online]. Available here . [Accessed May 27, 2022.]

[2] Creative Education Foundation (2015). The CPS Process [online]. Available here . [Accessed May 26, 2022.]

[3] Kaner, S. et al. (2014). 'Facilitator′s Guide to Participatory Decision–Making,' San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

[4] Puccio, G., Mance, M., and Murdock, M. (2011). 'Creative Leadership: Skils That Drive Change' (2nd Ed.), Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

[5] OmniSkills (2013). Creative Problem Solving [online]. Available here . [Accessed May 26, 2022].

[6] Treffinger, G., Isaksen, S., and Dorval, B. (2010). Creative Problem Solving (CPS Version 6.1). Center for Creative Learning, Inc. & Creative Problem Solving Group, Inc. Available here .

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Home Blog Business Creative Thinking: The skill to think out of the box

Creative Thinking: The skill to think out of the box

Creative Thinking: The skill to think out of the box

Robert W. Weisberg, in his book, Rethinking Creativity: Inside-the-Box Thinking as the Basis for Innovation , reveals that real innovation relies on inside-the-box thinking. The seed of the idea is usually laid by what we already know. Developing creative skills is the key to innovation. Very often, creativity and innovation are used interchangeably. Creative thinking is not always inherent, but one can surely grow this skill by practice. According to an IBM poll of more than 1,500 CEOs, creativity is the most important factor for future business success, surpassing managerial discipline, ethics, and vision.

What is Creative Thinking? 

Creative thinking is a skill that helps you develop appealing and valuable ideas. Oxford Dictionary defines creative thinking as “the use of imagination or original ideas to create something.” Being imaginative and thinking beyond the box is critical to success in every sector. One of the world’s most prominent thinkers on creativity, Edward de Bono, adds that creativity is about breaking out old habits and seeing things in new ways.

It might be a new approach to a challenge or a solution to an employee dispute. Microsoft’s research with YouGov backs up this more technical sense of creativity, with 62 percent of British professionals characterizing it as finding a new approach to solve a problem .

Why is Creative Thinking important?

Creative thinking allows you to take an inventive approach to issues and cultivate open-mindedness.

Why is Creative Thinking important? Big Concept slide design for Creative Thinking sessions.

You can produce new ideas, analyze events, find themes, and design alternatives to established operation systems by using creative thinking.

  • Provides confidence: When you employ creativity to explore diverse ideas and concepts, it gives you confidence and encourages you to bring out the best.
  • Self-reliance : With an urge to explore more, you become self-reliant. Creativity allows you to work on your goals and achieve them with complete fulfillment.
  • Tackle situations: As creative thinking drives you to experiment and innovate, it expands your collective knowledge regarding various methods to handle every situation effortlessly.
  • Releases stress: Creative thinking can be a stress buster as it enables you to be innovative beyond any boundaries. 
  • Express hidden talents: Creative thinking allows you to nurture curiosity and unlock your hidden talents.
  • Developing emotional intelligence: Creative thinking promotes considering circumstances from many perspectives, which can help you build empathy and emotional intelligence.

Developing Creative Thinking

Being a creative thinker enables you to develop fresh ways to approach existing situations. It gives you the sense to recognize the importance of various mindsets, methodologies, and theories. 

Developing Creative Thinking permits you to link thoughts and see parallels between totally different situations. Let us walk you through some ways to build creative thinking at your workplace:

  • Establish purpose and intention: Identify what creativity is and focus on building the right team with the right amount of creativity. Focus on the objectives and blend new ideas for desirable outcomes.
  • Build basic skills through communication: Creative thinkers are good at communication skills. Good communication skills can help you express your ideas and share your creativity confidently. 
  • Encourage autonomy: According to Philip Rosedale, the founder and chairman of Linden Lab, the company’s most significant achievements come from workers’ creativity when given freedom. 
  • Create a diverse team: Diversity enhances creativity. Allow your teammates from diverse backgrounds and areas of expertise to share their thinking.
  • Build motivation : Promote and support the innovative beliefs of your team members to motivate them. Reward your workers for their vivid creativity.
  • Provide opportunities to explore: Encourage your team members to collaborate and share their thoughts. Individuals in the team can learn by exploring, testing, and refining new ideas.
  • Focus on mastering metacognitive skills: Consider organizing training sessions in techniques like brainstorming, lateral thinking and mind-mapping to master metacognitive skills.

Types of Creative Thinking 

Creative thinking involves honing your innovative talents and soft skills to develop fresh ideas. Creative thinking skills are techniques for dealing with a situation through creative perspectives while using the appropriate tools to analyze it and design a solution.

Following are the five types of creating thinking:

  • Analytical: Analytical thinking allows you to investigate complicated challenges. It helps you formulate the best decisions for your organization and the recognition and development of solutions. Understanding challenges and analyzing the situation for feasible solutions is an important skill in every role at every level. Developing this skill can help you improve your work and meet business objectives.
  • Problem-solving: After thorough research and analysis of the problem, you need to look for an appropriate solution. With problem-solving skills, you can sort and arrange data found during the research process to develop a logical and practical answer.
  • Open-mindedness: A creative mind is flexible, and creativity requires fluid thinking . Being more open-minded implies being more receptive to new ideas, viewpoints, cultures, forms of expression, and styles and recognizing that our point of view may not always be correct. 
  • Communication: The ability to articulate and communicate your thoughts can govern your creative thinking skills at the workplace. It includes listening and processing people’s ideas before providing input and exchanging ideas via writing and speaking for effective communication.
  • Organization: Being organized allows you to be more creative and gives your imagination more structure. Employ your organizational abilities to turn your ideas into concrete strategies that you can use to bring change as you explore new ideas. 

What are Creative Thinking Techniques? 

Creative thinking skills may not be inherited but can indeed be acquired. You can enhance your creative abilities by improvising various strategies and techniques.

Mindmapping

Mind mapping allows you to connect concepts you never imagined could be connected

Mind mapping allows you to connect concepts you never imagined could be connected. As a result, it might assist you in coming up with appropriate ideas while applying creative thinking skills. It is a process to write down everything that pops into mind. Create as many ideas as you can; the more you write down, the more likely you will come up with the best idea. Consider mind mapping to organize your thoughts and come to logical conclusions. With the help of a 100% editable mind mapping template , you can present your ideas in a problem-solving discussion within your team or use it along with other creative thinking techniques to enrich your discussions.

Brainstorming

Innovative brainstorming session illustration for presentations

The central notion behind brainstorming is that having many creative possible ideas makes it simpler to choose the best one. This innovative thinking technique may effectively solve small or large-scale problems that demand creativity. The primary purpose is to build a group of people with whom you can freely exchange thoughts. Assist your team members in developing an experimental approach that produces outcomes at the workplace with brainstorming.

Lateral thinking

Critical thinking technique Lateral thinking

Emphasize generating new ideas in your organization while minimizing the details of how you can implement those ideas. Lateral thinking helps your thoughts wander freely and examine options that may otherwise go unnoticed. It involves looking at a problem from unconventional perspectives and coming up with innovative solutions as a result.

Reframing illustration for critical thinking

To come up with a fresh, inventive strategy, you’ll need to look at an issue or a scenario in a different manner, which requires reframing. Explore alternative interpretations of words, analyze the context, and broaden your perspective to spot something new and anticipate future roadblocks.

Mood boards 

Image board or mood board illustration created by SlideModel.com

A mood board is a visual graphic or representation of your ideas put together in one place . It gives your audience a clear vision of what an idea would look like after its execution. Plot your company’s desired goals with this image board creative thinking tool.

How to think critically and creatively?

Creativity is all about exploring and looking for new ideas. When we think out of the box and step outside of what we already know, we tend to draw new connections. This usually results in fresh insights, new ideas, and innovative solutions to problems that we could not have imagined previously. Critical thinking emphasizes analyzing and breaking down the problem, and creative thinking can bring about an appropriate solution for the analyzed data. That is the cornerstone of problem-solving with creative thinking. 

Let us look at the example to understand how to solve problems using creative thinking. 

When presented with a problem at the workplace, the employee analyzes it and then does thorough research. Then he shares (communicates) the problem with the teammate who presents him with progressive ideas (brainstorming and reframing) and hence a solution.

Examples of Creative Thinking in Business 

Adobe’s Creative Dividend study states that “More companies that foster creativity achieve exceptional revenue growth than peers.” Creativity is a skill that you can acquire and improve through practice. On the other hand, businesses must assist their workers in using their creative muscles by providing the correct culture, environment, training, and technology.

Let’s walk you through a set of examples of creative thinking in the business:

  • Microsoft recognized that out-of-date technologies and procedures and ill-equipped workspaces restricted the capacity to think creatively and therefore designed a range of devices to help people discover their creative potential at work.
  • Steve Jobs invented a new product like iPod due to brainstorming and lateral thinking when no one could ever imagine it.

Strike a note with your target audience with an insightful presentation on creative thinking. Deliver an innovative presentation with fresh ideas to your investors using creative thinking skills templates.

Final Words 

Whatever field you work in, you’ll discover that creative thinking can help you achieve your ambitions. Remember that everyone has the power to be creative and that creativity is primarily defined by the ability to think in unconventional ways. Help your staff to stretch their creative muscles by giving coaching training that will allow them to improve their creative thinking abilities.

Alternatively, we recommend our article on Design Thinking Process to solve company problems in an effective and innovatively way.

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Introduction to Critical and Creative Thinking

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Critical and Creative Thinking"— Presentation transcript:

Introduction to Critical and Creative Thinking

1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Communication and Collaboration

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

PUBLIC SPEAKING DEFINITION

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

Critical Reading Strategies: Overview of Research Process

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

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problem solving and creative thinking

Problem Solving and Creative Thinking

Jun 14, 2012

1.06k likes | 2.24k Views

Problem Solving and Creative Thinking. Problem Solving. What is a Problem? A problem arises when a living creature has a goal but does not know how this goal is to be reached.

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Problem Solving What is a Problem? A problem arises when a living creature has a goal but does not know how this goal is to be reached. [A problem exists] whenever one cannot go from the given situation to the desired situation simply by action. [K. Dunker, On Problem Solving, (1945) p. 1] What is Problem Solving? Problem Solving is the process of working out or discovering how to reach such a goal.

What is creative thinking? Creative thinking is the process of generating novel ideas and alternative courses of action, no matter how good those ideas and alternatives might be. Creative thinking should not be seen as an alternative to critical thinking When you have recognised a problem, then you should employ creative thinking to produce some options for solving the problem, then you should employ critical thinking If you haven’t come up with enough options to begin with, then your critical thinking decision procedure might produce the wrong result… a dangerous result!

Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, and Problem Solving Creative thinking supports critical thinking … While critical thinking focuses on step-by-step, linear processes aimed at arriving at a correct answer, creative thinking begins with possibility, multiple ideas, and suspended judgement. It might be said that creative thinking supports the ideas with which critical thinking works. Thus, even though these two kinds of thinking work in different ways, they actually support one another and aim at the same ultimate goal, which is to solve a problem … At the beginning of the process, creative methods are used to examine the problem environment, generate ideas, and make associations. Then the analysis and judgment faculties are brought into play, and the possibilities are analyzed for a possible solution. [Robert Harris, CB pp. 115-6]

Who is this man?

Archimedes Great inventor, mathematician etc. The Screw  The Lever

Archimedes Helped protect Syracuse from the Romans in the siege of 213BC The Mirror The Claw

Archimedes’ puzzle • Did the smithy replace some of the kings gold with silver? • How did Archimedes find out? • (Not Archimedes style to torture the smithy)

Solution to Archimedes’ puzzle. • The solution, which occurred when he stepped into a public bath and caused it to overflow, was to put a weight of gold equal to the crown, and known to be pure, into a bowl which was filled with water to the brim. Then the gold would be removed and the king’s crown put in, in its place. An alloy of lighter silver would increase the bulk of the crown and cause the bowl to overflow. [Vitruvius, De Architectura] • And the wreath was impure!

Creative thinking! • It was very useful to Archimedes • He was well respected and treated in Syracuse • Marcellus, the Roman general, ordered his life to be spared when Syracuse finally fell • But his obsession with maths was ultimately his downfall! • Can we be like Archimedes? • Can we learn to be creative thinkers?

4 Methods for Generating Ideas • Associative Techniques • Analytic Techniques • Brainstorming • Role Playing

Associative Techniques • Compare something familiar to something unfamiliar. • Close analogy e.g. apples and pears • Remote analogy e.g. Pringles • Forced analogy…

Forced Analogy 1 • The problem: recreating that dazzling 360 degree panoramic holiday view • The forced analogy: a wreath • The answer!

Forced Analogy 2 • The problem: vertigo • The forced analogy: swimming • The answer!

Forced Analogy 3 • The problem: Carrying lots of shopping when its raining • The forced analogy: a tennis player • The answer!

Analytic Techniques • Breaking a problem down into smaller parts • E.g. How can I make the All Blacks win the Rugby World Cup? • Vital components of the problem: • Henry: Just one:ensuring the ABs perform to their capacity • Hence the 4 Rs of Henry’s regime • Rest • Rotation • Relationships within team are friendly • Really discreet signaling during matches

Analytic Techniques • Unfortunately (as we know), Henry didn’t analyse the problem thoroughly. • He missed a vital component of the problem: • The Barnes Factor

Analytic Techniques • Good analytic techniques will help to ensure that all of the important components of the problem are addressed

Brainstorming • Deliberately set about coming up with alternatives, and write them all down, no matter what. • No idea is a bad idea (at least just yet) • Edward de Bono 6 hats – green hat time • One company generated 2,200 ideas in one day!

Roleplaying • Roleplaying. Attempt to simulate aspects of the problem and proposed solutions. Try to imagine details of the relevant outcomes after your choice has been made, and attempt to put yourself in the shoes of other people. • A good method for gathering information and gaining perspective • E.g. Theoretical vs. practical lecturing • E.g. Customers-eye-view of displays • E.g. Hand-out-of-the-car-window aerodynamics

But Archimedes was not just a creative thinker... • He was also a prolific problem solver • So, how can we harness these 4 idea creation techniques to help us solve problems? • Ideas should be generated after the problem has been properly understood and represented

The Main Message Solving real problems is a two step process: Model Solution Problem In order to generate potentially fruitful ideas, and thereby make it more likely that you solve your problem, make sure you represent the problem in the right way.

The Lights Example • One and only one of the switches (A, B & C)on the outside of the room turns on all of the lights (x, y & z) in the room • From outside, you cannot see into the room • The wiring is hidden from view • You are not allowed to damage any of the property • Is there a way of knowing for sure which switch turns the lights on? • Once you enter the room, you cannot leave again to rearrange the switches xyz C B A

The Lights Example Switches: Possible arrangements: A 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 B 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 C 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 – on, 0 – off

The Bird-Train Problem (Posner, 1973) • Station 1 and Station 2 are 50 miles apart on a straight train track • Train 1 leaves Station 1 at the same time that Train 2 leaves Station 2 • Both trains travel at 25 miles per hour toward the other station • The bird starts directly above Train 1 and flies above the track until it reaches Train 2. Then it flies back to Train 1 etc. • The bird flies at 230 miles per hour • How far has the bird flown by the time the trains meet?

The Bird-Train Problem (Posner, 1973)

The Drop Block Problem What will happen to the block of wood when the person lets go of it?

The Drop Block Problem The block will drop down as it is drawn to earth by gravity

The Drop Block Problem … so long as the person is on earth.

The Drop Block Problem It will float up if the person is under water.

The Drop Block Problem And it will go nowhere (or a little bit sideways?!) if the person is in space.

So, how can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 1: Drop presuppositions that aren’t explicit in the original statement of the problem

The Nine Dot Problem (Maier, 1931) • Can you connect all of the dots with just 4 straight lines? • You cannot take your pen off the paper • You can’t use a ridiculously big pen • The second line must start where the first line finished. The third line must start where the second line finished etc. • Imagine the dots are drawn on a flat an immovable surface • The solution…

Solution to The Nine Dot Problem (Maier, 1931)

How can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 1: Drop presuppositions that aren’t explicit in the original statement of the problem.

A Terrible Accident • There was a terrible accident on the motorway coming into Wellington • A man was killed on impact and his son was rushed to hospital with life-threatening injuries • At the hospital, the surgeon saw the boy and said: “I can’t operate, that’s my son” • What is going on here? • Many of us assume that surgeons have to be male, making us come up with crazy answers for a simple question

How can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 1: Drop presuppositions that aren’t explicit in the original statement of the problem. Suggestion 2: Make sure you represent everything explicit in the original statement of the problem.

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years On a street somewhere: Ted: All three of my sons celebrate their birthday today. Can you tell me how old each one is? (Ted is a bit weird) Fred: Yes, but you have to tell me something about them… Ted: The product of their ages is 36. Fred: I need more info… Ted: The sum of their ages is equal to the number of windows in the building next to us… Fred: I need more info… Ted: My oldest son has blue eyes. Fred: That is sufficient!  Can Fred really know how old Ted’s sons are? How?

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years • Age of the first son: x • Age of the second son: y • Age of the third son: z • Safe assumption: x ≥ y ≥ z

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years “The product of their ages is 36”: xyz • 1 1 • 2 1 • 3 1 • 9 4 1 • 9 2 2 • 6 6 1 • 6 3 2 • 4 3 3

2 old high school math club pals meet up after many years “The sum of their ages is equal to the number of windows in the building next to us…” xyz • + 1 + 1 = 38 • + 2 + 1 = 21 • + 3 + 1 = 16 • 9 + 4 + 1 = 14 • 9 + 2 + 2 = 13 • 6 + 6 + 1 = 13 • 6 + 3 + 2 = 11 • 4 + 3 + 3 = 10

How can I best represent a problem? Suggestion 2: Make sure you represent everything explicit in the original statement of the problem.

There are five houses, each of a different color and inhabited by men of different nationalities, with one unique pet, drink, and car. Some facts are given: 1. The Englishman lives in the red house. 2. The Spaniard owns the dog. 3. The man in the green house drinks cocoa. 4. The Ukrainian drinks eggnog. 5. The green house is immediately to the right (your right) of the ivory house. 6. The owner of the Oldsmobile also owns snails. 7. The owner of the Ford lives in the yellow house. 8. The man in the middle house drinks milk. 9. The Norwegian lives in the first house on the left. 10. The man who owns the Chevrolet lives in the house next to the house where the man owns a fox. 11. The Ford owner's house is next to the house where the horse is kept. 12. The Mercedes-Benz owner drinks orange juice. 13. The Japanese drives a Volkswagen. 14. The Norwegian lives next to the blue house. Who owns the Zebra?

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creative thinking and problem solving presentation

Design Thinking and Innovation

Key concepts, who will benefit, aspiring or current innovation managers, entrepreneurs, product managers, developers, and marketers.

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What You Earn

Certificate of Completion

Certificate of Completion

Boost your resume with a Certificate of Completion from HBS Online

Earn by: completing this course

Certificate of Specialization

Certificate of Specialization

Prove your mastery of entrepreneurship and innovation

Earn by: completing any three courses within this subject area to earn a Certificate of Specialization

Content Week - Clarify: Empathy and Understanding

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  • An Introduction to Innovation
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Project week – clarify.

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Content Week - Ideate, Part 1: Tools for Generating Ideas

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Our difference, about the professor.

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Srikant Datar Design Thinking and Innovation

Dates & eligibility.

No current course offerings for this selection.

All applicants must be at least 18 years of age, proficient in English, and committed to learning and engaging with fellow participants throughout the course.

Learn about bringing this course to your organization .

Learner Stories

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Design Thinking and Innovation FAQs

Could you tell me a little more about the ai course assistant chat bot.

You can think of the beta version of the Design Thinking and Innovation AI Course Assistant chat bot in two ways: like a virtual Teaching Assistant who can help you consolidate and confirm your understanding of course concepts, and as a virtual Learner Success Assistant who can help you stay on track with completing the coursework in a timely fashion. When you are finding a particular concept difficult to master, or would like additional examples of a theory, try asking the bot your question in the same way you would phrase it to a human TA. If you have a question pertaining to where or how to submit certain assignments, or one relating to deadlines or time estimates, you can also express those in a similar fashion. Please note that no preexisting familiarity or experience with generative AI is necessary or assumed to use the bot and, while we encourage you to engage with the bot and share your candid feedback on your experience, a lack of engagement with the bot will not adversely impact your eligibility for a certificate of completion.

What are the learning requirements in order to successfully complete the course, and how are grades assigned?

Participants in Design Thinking and Innovation are eligible for a Certificate of Completion from Harvard Business School Online.

Participants are expected to fully complete all coursework in a thoughtful and timely manner. This will mean meeting each week’s course module deadlines and fully answering questions posed therein. This helps ensure participants proceed through the course at a similar pace and can take full advantage of social learning opportunities. In addition to module and assignment completion, we expect you to offer feedback on others’ reflections and contribute to conversations on the platform. Participants who fail to complete the course requirements will not receive a certificate and will not be eligible to retake the course.

More detailed information on course requirements will be communicated at the start of the course. No grades are assigned for Design Thinking and Innovation. Participants will either be evaluated as complete or not complete.

What materials will I have access to after completing Design Thinking and Innovation?

You will have access to the materials in every prior module as you progress through the program. Access to course materials and the course platform ends 60 days after the final deadline in the program.

At the end of each course module, you will be able to download a PDF summary highlighting key concepts used throughout the course. At the end of the program, you will receive a PDF compilation of all of the module summary documents. We hope the module summary documents will serve as a helpful resource after you finish the course.

How should I list my certificate on my resume?

Once you've earned your Certificate of Completion, list it on your resume along with the date of completion:

Harvard Business School Online Certificate in Design Thinking and Innovation [Cohort Start Month and Year]

List your certificate on your LinkedIn profile under "Education" with the language from the Credential Verification page:

School: Harvard Business School Online Dates Attended: [The year you participated in the program] Degree: Other; Certificate in Design Thinking and Innovation Field of Study: Leave blank Grade: "Complete" Activities and Societies: Leave blank

Description: Design Thinking and Innovation is a 7-week, 40-hour online certificate program from Harvard Business School. Design Thinking and Innovation will teach you how to leverage fundamental design thinking principles and innovative problem-solving tools to address business challenges and build products, strategies, teams, and environments for optimal use and performance.

The program was developed by leading Harvard Business School faculty and is delivered in an active learning environment based on the HBS signature case-based learning model.

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Beginning in Module 2 of Design Thinking and Innovation, you will apply the tools you learn in the course to an innovation problem that is important or interesting to you, or you can use a provided scenario. In subsequent modules, you will use your earlier responses to build on your innovation project and make each phase of design thinking relevant to your own work.

Do I need to collaborate with others to complete the project?

No, each individual submits their own work in Design Thinking and Innovation, and all project work can be submitted without sharing it with others in the course. You are encouraged to share with others and ask for feedback, but collaboration isn’t necessary to advance through the course.

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  • 9 Soft Skills Employers Want...

9 Soft Skills Employers Want in 2024

10 min read · Updated on December 19, 2023

Ken Chase

Don't forget about these soft skills that can help you to succeed in 2023

You're in the middle of your job search and you feel confident that you're the right candidate for the job. And why are you so sure? That's easy - you have all the professional skills the job requires, from the training to the industry knowledge and technical skills.

News flash - so does your competition! The question is: do you have the soft skills employers want from their job candidates?

The playing field has changed now, thanks to the pandemic and its impact on the labor market. The last few years have created new challenges that forced companies to do things differently and, consequently, they changed what recruiters really care about . 

“Undeniably, COVID-19 has thrown a wrench into the hiring process for both job seekers and recruiters alike, which our data confirms by uncovering what's newly important in one's candidacy,” said Amanda Augustine, TopResume's career expert.

“Our findings reveal that job seekers may be taking themselves out of the running even before - or right after - the virtual interview, because they're ignoring the key factors to which recruiters are suddenly paying attention.”

It's not as mysterious as you might think. What really helps job candidates to stand out from the rest are the soft skills employers want and need. The new normal includes not only more remote work, but also an increased emphasis on productivity and collaboration. That means that key soft skills in the workplace are more important than ever, with some rising to the top of recruiters' wish lists in 2023.

What are soft skills?

Think of soft skills for work as your personal skills - things you do that make you a great employee outside of the technical skills that are needed for the job. They may come naturally to you, or perhaps you've added some classes to your list to augment these abilities. If you haven't, consider taking online classes and other certification courses to develop strong soft skills in the workplace. Including soft skills on a resume is absolutely essential if you want employers to quickly see that you have the talents they're looking for.

These are the top soft skills employers want to see :

1. Creative problem solving and innovation

The last few years have presented a plethora of new challenges for companies. The last thing an employer or hiring manager wants is an employee who sees a challenging situation or new task and says, “Wow, I don't know what to do here.” Instead, they want to know that you can think logically and creatively to develop solutions to the problems or obstacles that arise from day to day.

They also hope you'll help to come up with new ideas while addressing existing problems. And the more creative, the better; that kind of thinking leads to innovation and improvements within the company.

On your resume, be sure to highlight your problem solving skills and list situations where you had to use your creativity in the face of adversity by coming up with innovative solutions to the problems you encountered.

At your interview, express your enthusiasm for tackling challenges. Every job has hurdles and employers want to hire people who aren't afraid of tackling those challenges. Make sure that your interviewer knows you're one of those people.

2. Communication skills 

This is a broad category; it can include everything from how you converse with a client and colleagues to how well you get your point across in emails. The ability to communicate with clients and team members is essential. And, now that most communication is done through emails, chats, video, or phone conference calls, strong communication skills are more critical than ever. 

Taking a class on effective communication skills is well worth your time and money. It's one of the most crucial soft skills in any job, in any industry. If you already think that it's one of your best attributes, find a way to demonstrate that on your resume and in your interview.

3. Time management

Moving to a partial or complete work-from-home environment was a big leap of faith for many employers and hiring managers. Would their teams be legitimately productive away from their office? Without the natural structure that a day at the office provides, time management became a soft skill that quickly rose to the top of many recruiters' priority lists.

Time management means that you know how to organize your schedule to get your projects done on time and with efficiency. How well can you focus on your work and manage your time to stay productive, without a manager looking over your shoulder?

Your work calendar is your best friend when it comes to time management. Set daily and weekly goals for what you'd like to accomplish and don't be afraid to block off time on your calendar to zero in on that work. If you're preparing for a job interview, see if you can learn what project management tools the company uses and familiarize yourself with those products. If you can demonstrate familiarity with the tools they use, you'll have a leg up on the competition. 

4. A growth mindset 

When it comes to ensuring longevity in your career , you need to be able to grow and adapt to changes within your industry and the job market as a whole. With the  mechanization of jobs and industries, having a growth mindset is essential. 

So, what is a growth mindset? Professionals with a growth mindset are motivated to reach higher levels of achievement by continuously learning new skills in order to move with a changing market. Essentially, it's being adaptable and willing to go above and beyond the soft and hard skills you already have. 

Showcase your growth mindset on your resume by highlighting examples of how you showed initiative by learning a new skill that improved your performance or helped you to keep pace with industry changes.  

5. Emotional intelligence

What does it mean to have high emotional intelligence? Emotional intelligence is the ability to perceive, evaluate, and respond to your emotions and the emotions of others. This means that you're able to think empathetically about the people around you and the interpersonal relationships that develop in the workplace.

This is another of those soft skills employers want to see, and it's taken on new meaning for 2023. As we emerge from the shadow of the recent pandemic, many people continue to struggle with their place in the workforce and the world. Having the ability to read the emotions of your co-workers and respond with compassion is essential. 

In fact, one survey by CareerBuilder reported that 71% of employers value emotional intelligence in an employee over IQ, while 75% are more likely to promote an employee with higher EQ (emotional quotient) over someone with higher IQ. 

The best way to show your emotional intelligence? During your interview .

6. Collaboration

Collaborating with your co-workers isn't as easy as it seems. There are always those who believe that they know how to do the job and don't trust others to do their part - and that can create tension in the office and hurt overall efficiency. 

Learning to trust others, work together, and give and accept ideas is a difficult skill to master - but, if you can, you'll be well ahead of the competition.

Show off your best collaboration soft skills in your resume by describing your ability to work with other team members. You should highlight it during your interview as well. Show enthusiasm for accepting colleagues' ideas and maximizing your team's overall efficiency by using each person's individual strengths.

7. Adaptability

Change is always a major part of the modern-day workplace. The lightning-fast advancement of technology has forced industries to evolve or perish in recent years. Those changes are sure to continue in the years to come, which is why adaptability is now one of the top skills employers are looking for in job candidates.

Think about all of the changes we've seen in recent years. Many offices went from 100% on-site work to partial or completely remote work during the pandemic. Video conferencing became an everyday occurrence, while working and collaborating online is now considered routine. All of these things have required workers to adapt to new methods, new technology, and new ways of thinking. 

Think about all the ways you've had to adapt in the past and be prepared to showcase how well you can go with the flow during your next interview. 

8. Active listening

Everyone loves a good listener. It shouldn't be hard to do, but for many people it's a struggle - especially in a remote environment. Active listening is more than just listening intently; the active listener shows that they're engaged in the conversation by saying little things like, “Okay,” or “I understand,” and nodding. It also means asking questions, making eye contact, and withholding judgment. 

It can be all too easy to become disengaged from your sixth video conference of the day or that morning check-in call before you've had your coffee. If you're uncertain what it really means to be an active listener, do a little research and practice it at home with your family or friends (they'll appreciate it, too). Then, during your interview, let your active listening skills shine as you engage with your interviewer. 

9. Leadership

While creativity, communication skills, a growth mindset, emotional intelligence, and collaboration are all relevant skills that can make you a great employee, leadership skills will elevate you even further. Most employers and hiring managers are always looking for someone who is capable of growing beyond that role.

Leadership skills are really a combination of all the other soft skills. When you put them together, you have a person who can not only work well with the team but also take the reins and make the rest of the team better.

If you've been in charge of big projects in the past, bring that out in your resume and mention it in job interviews. Show that you're not someone who is just looking to punch in and punch out, but an applicant who is ready to conquer this job and grow into a future leader within the company; that makes you an attractive investment for them.

Showcase the soft skills employers want to see

Think of your soft skills as accessories to your hard, job-related skills. They alone cannot qualify you for a job, but when paired with solid credentials they can make you a much more attractive candidate. As you review your soft skills, keep in mind how the last few years have changed the playing field and highlight those that will help you shine in the “new normal” work environment. 

From cashier to construction worker to CEO, soft skills are universally needed in today's workforce. Learn to cultivate yours and display them for employers to see - and you'll keep yourself ahead of the pack.

Are the soft skills employers want to see highlighted on your resume? Check today with a free resume review !  

This article was originally written by Tyler Omoth and updated by Ken Chase in 2023.

Recommended reading:

What Are Soft Skills? And How to Showcase Them on Your Resume

Resources for In-Demand Job Skills You Can Learn Online

The Top 10 Job Skills Employers Want

Related Articles:

8 Tips to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market

There's Nothing Wrong With Having a Gap Between Jobs

7 Signs Your Resume is Making You Look Old

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TechBullion

TechBullion

Top 10 tech gadgets for kids in 2024 that parents will love.

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

More Society has advance where technology permeates every aspect of our lives, it’s only natural that it plays a significant role in our children’s development too. However, finding tech gadgets that strike a balance between education and entertainment can be challenging. Fortunately, 2024 has brought a plethora of innovative gadgets designed to delight kids and reassure parents. Here are the top ten tech gadgets for kids in 2024 that parents will love.

Osmo Genius Starter Kit:

The Osmo Genius Starter Kit is an award-winning educational tool that merges physical play with digital interaction. Perfect for kids aged 6-10, it offers a range of games that promote learning in a fun and engaging way.

Key Features:

Interactive learning games Focus on math, spelling, and problem-solving Compatible with iPads and Fire tablets

Parents will appreciate how Osmo seamlessly integrates educational content into their children’s playtime, ensuring they learn while having fun.

Sphero BOLT:

Sphero BOLT is a programmable robotic ball that introduces children to the basics of coding and robotics. It’s designed to inspire creativity and ignite curiosity about technology.

LED matrix display for coding visual effects Infrared communication for collaborative play Durable and waterproof

Parents will love how Sphero BOLT combines entertainment with STEM learning, encouraging kids to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Amazon Fire HD 10 Kids Edition:

The Amazon Fire HD 10 Kids Edition is a kid-friendly tablet that offers a perfect blend of education and entertainment. It comes with robust parental controls and a sturdy, kid-proof case.

10.1-inch Full HD display Thousands of age-appropriate apps and games Two-year worry-free guarantee

This tablet allows parents to customize content and screen time, ensuring their children have a safe and productive digital experience.

Kano PC is a build-it-yourself laptop that empowers kids to learn about computers through hands-on assembly and coding. It’s a fantastic educational tool for budding tech enthusiasts.

Runs Windows 10 Includes educational software for coding Step-by-step assembly guide

Parents will appreciate how Kano PC fosters an understanding of computer hardware and software, promoting valuable tech skills in a fun and interactive way.

Anki Vector Robot

Anki Vector is an AI-powered companion robot that offers a blend of fun and learning . With voice recognition and a range of interactive features, Vector can engage children in various educational activities.

Autonomous and responsive Integrates with Alexa for voice commands Equipped with advanced sensors and a camera

Parents will love Vector’s ability to entertain and educate, making it an excellent addition to any child’s learning toolkit.

Nintendo Labo:

Nintendo Labo combines DIY cardboard creations with interactive gaming, offering a unique blend of creativity and technology. It’s designed for use with the Nintendo Switch, allowing kids to build and play with their creations.

DIY kits for building interactive models Engaging games that use built models Encourages creativity and engineering skills

Parents will appreciate how Nintendo Labo transforms screen time into a hands-on learning experience, promoting creativity and problem-solving.

VTech KidiZoom Creator Cam:

The VTech KidiZoom Creator Cam is a kid-friendly video camera designed for young creators. It allows children to make their own videos with special effects, animations, and music.

Built-in video editor Green screen for special effects Durable and easy to use

Parents will love the KidiZoom Creator Cam for its ability to encourage creativity and self-expression, helping kids develop basic video production skills.

LEGO Boost Creative Toolbox:

The LEGO Boost Creative Toolbox is a programmable robotics kit that combines traditional LEGO building with coding. Kids can build and program five different models, including a robot and a guitar.

Over 840 LEGO pieces Easy-to-use coding interface Interactive building instructions

Parents will appreciate how LEGO Boost fosters creativity, engineering skills, and coding knowledge, making it a versatile educational tool.

Ozobot Bit Coding Robot:

Ozobot Bit is a tiny, programmable robot that teaches kids the basics of coding through color-coded commands. It’s an excellent introductory tool for young coders.

Follows color-coded paths Compatible with OzoBlockly coding platform Encourages logical thinking

Parents will love Ozobot Bit for its simplicity and educational value, making coding accessible and fun for young children.

SmartGlobe Adventure AR:

The SmartGlobe Adventure AR by Oregon Scientific is an interactive globe that uses augmented reality to teach kids about geography, cultures, and space.

Augmented reality app for interactive learning Over 4000 pieces of information Games and quizzes for enhanced engagement

Parents will appreciate how SmartGlobe Adventure AR combines traditional learning with modern technology , making geography exciting and immersive.

Conclusion:

These ten tech gadgets offer a perfect blend of education and entertainment for kids in 2024. From interactive learning tools like Osmo and Sphero BOLT to creative platforms like Nintendo Labo and LEGO Boost, each gadget is designed to engage and educate. Parents will love how these devices promote critical thinking, creativity, and problem-solving skills. By incorporating these tech gadgets into their children’s playtime, parents can ensure a balanced and enriching digital experience. Embracing these innovative tools will help prepare kids for a future where technology plays a central role in everyday life.

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

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Thinking skills

Teaching Thinking Skills----Antalya-Istanbul-Cappadocia-Alanya

This programme aims to develop teacher skills on how to integrate critical and creative thinking skills into lesson processes, focusing on basic, analytical, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During the course, lesson plans will be developed and implemented in which thinking skills are explicitly emphasised.

Description

Learning objectives, methodology & assessment, certification details, pricing, packages and other information.

  • Package contents: Accommodation Course Meals Transport

Additional information

  • Language: English
  • Target audience ISCED: Primary education (ISCED 1) Lower secondary education (ISCED 2) Upper secondary education (ISCED 3)
  • Target audience type: Teacher Head Teacher / Principal Teacher Educator
  • Learning time: 25 hours or more

Upcoming sessions

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

Key competences

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Environmental Education and Biodiversity -----Antalya-Alanya

Next upcoming session  08.06.2024 - 15.06.2024

creative thinking and problem solving presentation

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Innovative assesment

Innovative Assessment -------- Antalya-Istanbul-Alanya

IMAGES

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  26. Top 10 Tech Gadgets for Kids in 2024 That Parents Will Love

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